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9

Imrei Baruch says the following answers to your question. A: Chizkuni - The brothers drank since at that moment there was no Gezaira (decree) yet for Stam Yainom (non-Jewish wine). B: Medrosh Talpios: They drank out of "Aimas Hamalchus" (fear of the king) C: He goes on to say that the brothers considered themselves as Bnai Noach and thus together with ...


6

Red is described as preferable, though white is always acceptable if necessary. (Or perhaps even if it's a type of wine you strongly prefer.) During times of the blood libels, white wine was actually recommended for the seder as no one could claim you were hiding blood in your glass. For regular kiddush, the Gemara says you can use freshly-squeezed grapes. ...


5

This one's fairly clear-cut. The Talmud says it's prohibited to sell frankincense in small, retail amounts to pagans that they will use in their pagan worship. However you can sell it in bulk as wholesale, and what the retailer does with it is not your concern. I may not enable a non-Jew to worship idols, but I may enable the enabler. (That's indirect ...


5

Well if you are dying of thirst and the only liquid available is not kosher, I guess you could drink it. But otherwise -- there are other ways to fulfill your mitzva of kiddush. If you had no food around whatsoever, you'd still get the Biblical mitzva by saying the prayers (and thus "remembering the Sabbath day"). Otherwise: well if you can get to a grocery ...


5

There were two reasons to prohibit -- the possibility of the wine being used for pagan practices, and to avoid intermarriage. The former would prohibit you from selling the wine too, the latter would only prohibit you from drinking it. The Gemara says if a non-Jewish baby touches the wine, that doesn't prohibit it from being sold, as that wasn't used for ...


5

Update: The answer below deals with yayin nesech and does not speak about "Stam Yanom" because it did not apply at thet time. Note that it says in 43:32 it says וַיָּשִׂימוּ לוֹ לְבַדּוֹ וְלָהֶם לְבַדָּם וְלַמִּצְרִים הָאֹכְלִים אִתּוֹ לְבַדָּם כִּי לֹא יוּכְלוּן הַמִּצְרִים לֶאֱכֹל אֶת הָעִבְרִים לֶחֶם כִּי תוֹעֵבָה הִוא לְמִצְרָיִם: And they set ...


4

Probably because of what the Shulchan Aruch, Yoreh De'ah says in סימן קכה - דין יין הבא מכח עובד כוכבים וכח כחו ב: כֹּחַ כֹּחוֹ כְּכֹחוֹ דָּמִי. וְאִם הוּא כֹּחַ כֹּחַ כֹּחוֹ, כְּגוֹן קוֹרַת הַגַּת שֶׁגִּלְגְּלָהּ עוֹבֵד כּוֹכָבִים, שֶׁיֵּשׁ שָׁם ג' כֹּחוֹת: הַדַּפִּין וְהַגַּלְגַּל וְהַקּוֹרָה, (ד) בְּדִיעֲבַד מֻתָּר אֲפִלּוּ בִּשְׁתִיָּה. ‏ And ...


3

The shulchan aruch in Yoreh Deah siman 124 siff 7 says 'A nonjew who does not worship idols who touches wine without intention, the wine is muttar to drink'. The Shach there #12 actually brings an example of Yishmaelim from the Rambam and says the Mechaber left it because this is not limited to yishmaelim only, but anyone who doesn't worship idols is the ...


3

I checked with my rav who quoted Rav Shlomo Zalman Aurbach. He holds that after 50% dilution any more means that it is not wine at all and that is why the bracha rishona is Shehakol and the bracha acharona is boreh nefashos no matter how much wine would have been in the mixture if you extracted it. After shacharis he spoke of the halachos of solid food ...


2

Regarding neveilah (See Bechoros 23), there would be no distinction to be made if you were wearing a glove or you sat on a dead animal (though sitting on a pillow on TOP of the animal would be different). The conveyance of Tumas maga happens irrespective of your clothes, which are considered batel to your body. The issue regarding yayn nesech is its use for ...


2

The Rambam and Rama apparently hold that sleep is not a replacement to the gemara's directions, but rather the Gemara's actual intent. THis can be infered from the fact the Rambam almost never states laws from outside the Gemara. Where did he get this bit about sleep from? He evidently read it into the Gemara. The Rama in DM connects his ruling to ...


2

Shulchan Aruch Yoreh Deah 131:1 says in part: ישראל שעשה יינו של עובד כוכבים בטהרה כדי שיהא מותר לישראל בין שמכרו לישראל ולא פרע לו מעות בין שלא מכרו לו אלא שהוא מטהרו כדי למכרו ע"י לישראלים ... אסור אפילו בחותם תוך חותם עד שיהא ישראל יושב ומשמר ... See the entire sif for the lengthy point, but the bottom line is that even double sealing does not help ...


2

Very good question! Answer is my own thinking, here... The wording in the Musaf paragraph has the word כמדובר - "as it is said". This means, that the measurements are specifically said in the same place that the sacrifice of that day is mentioned in the Torah, specifically, in parshat Pinchas Bamidbar 29:1-39. The only times the specific measurements for ...


2

Yes, one is chayiv to make an al hagafen since there is no special exclusion on the chiyuv of making an al hagafen for havdala. (In fact, not a proof but, the Aruch Hashulchan actually maintains that we don't generally make a bracha on besamim but do for havdala.)


2

The Shulchan Aruch in Yoreh Deah 123 17 rules that fermented grapes which has turned into wine is not subject to the laws of Yayin Nesech until the wine has been separated from the pits and peels, see there for the various laws. But in your case, no seperating has been done. So it would be fine. Another point concerning rotten wine would be if it had become ...


2

Rabbi Frand has a tape where he says he likes to drink grape juice all the time, and wondered about this -- it would be a lot cheaper if he could buy regular (non-kosher) grape juice. He was told even with today's fancy-schmancy machinery, there's a human hand someplace in the factory unclogging a filter or the like every so often.


2

This yeshiva.org.il article suggests an answer to your question: This is because wine is unique in that not only does it satiate, it also gladdens the heart. In addition, each type of wine has its own unique character, and when additional types of wine are consumed in company there is greater joy. This is why the sages instituted a special blessing over ...


1

While the rabbinic understanding is sourced in Talmud Bavli Berachot 35b, it is based on the specific biblical (albeit, Ketuvim) application of 'to gladden/be happy' found in Psalms 104:15.


1

Since the glass or bottle of wine is on the table when the original beracha of "borei pri ha'gafen" was made, I don't see why one should consider making "hatov ve'ha'maytiv." On a secondary note, I seriously doubt that anyone can notice a marked improvement in a glass of wine afte five minutes unless they talk themselves into it. I used to sell wine and ...


1

Not only does Birchas Hamazon work for wine when drunk during a meal, but even if a person accidentally says Birchas Hamazon on a cup of wine it also works. The Mishna Berurah in ziman 208 #76 explains that wine satiates זיין וסועד הלב like bread, so the bracha of הזן works. This same rule applies to dates.


1

While it's not a common position, some say that as wine that was cooked couldn't be used as a Temple libation, it can't be used for kiddush either. Wine that has molds growing on top is invalid for kiddush. Wine diluted beyond a certain point. I'm sure there are others, but those are the first that come to mind. (BTW there are scholars in the ...


1

According to Rambam the requirement of saying kiddush and havdalah over wine is a Rabbinic addition to the Torah commandment to sanctify the Sabbath by saying kiddush at it's beginning and havdalah at it's end. הלכות שבת כט,ו מדברי סופרים לקדש על היין, ולהבדיל על היין. It is a Rabbinic requirement to make Kidush on wine and to make Havdalah ...


1

In addition to loewian's answer, there seems to be no prohibition for a Noahide to consume wine used as libation for idolatry. See Pesahim 73a and Turei Even to Hagigah 13a s.v. ein mosrin, cited by Gilyon ha-Shas Pesahim ibid.


1

Rav Shmuel Kaminetsky in Kovetz Halchos 9:18,19 holds one should make havdallah on wine and the person making it should drink the wine and they can use a regular size cup and finish all the contents. In the footnotes(18) its brought that Rav Shlomo Zalman Aurabach would drink the wine himself instead of giving it to a katan. Rav Moshe also held that one ...


1

Basically, there are 3 separate mehalchim 1. Just drink the wine or grape juice yourself (no difference b/t the two) (Mechaber) 2. Find a child and he should drink it; if you cant find one - then drink it yourself (Rema) 3. Beer - (Aruch Hashulchan) Each of these views have a wide following among acharonim and contemporary poskim. Most Sefardim follow the ...



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