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10

Nitei Gavriel Nesuin 2 - 80:21:38 says that the source for saying L'Chaim on wine is Sefer Hapardes L'Rashi, Ravia Brachos 120, Tanya Rabsi 24, Bach Orach Chaim 174. The reason is that since wine brought a curse on the world when Noach drank and cursed Canaan therefore we say L'Chaim when we drink it. He also mentions in the name of the Baal Shem Tov not to ...


6

I heard the following: Wine and frankincense were administered to a person condemned to the death penalty Sanhedrin 43a This is an association between wine and death. So we say when we drink wine, L'chaim "to Life."


4

A primary source would be the מדרש תנחומה in פרשת פקודי at סימן ב העת שחוקרין העדים על העבירה שאדם עושה, יוצאין הסנהדרין וכל ישראל עמם לרחוב העיר, ומוציאין לשם לאיש שהוא מחוייב סקילה או אחד מארבע מיתות בית דין, ויוצאין שנים מהם או שלשה הגדולים מהם ודורשין לעדים. וכששבין מלחקור, אומר להם, סברי מרנן. והם אומרים, אם לחיים לחיים, ואם למיתה למיתה. אם הוא ...


3

Halachafortoday sources the Mishna Brurah 320:56 : ‏(נו) מותר - וכן מותר ליתן יין אדום בתוך יין לבן ואע״פ שמתאדם [ואפילו אם מכוין לכתחלה לעשות מראה בהמאכל או בהמשקה ג״כ מסתברא דאין להחמיר כן נראה מהפמ״ג ולפי מה שכתב בנ״א נכון למנוע מזה] ומ״מ אין רשאי לעשות מראה ביי״ש ודבש שיקנו ממנו [פמ״ג ע״ש טעמו וגם בלא״ה הוא עובדא דחול] וכ״ש שלא להשים סממנים ...


3

According to this article by Rabbi Shlomo Riskin, Rav Soloveitchik explained the special nature of bread as relating to the degree of human involvement required to turn G-d's creation (stalks of wheat) into edible bread. Rav Soloveitchik explained as follows: Concerning the Seven Species, the partnership between G-d and humans is limited, with the ...


3

A similar question applies to food cooked by a non-Jew who is converting to Judaism--can the convert eat the food or is it prohibited as bishul nokhri? R. Herschel Schachter apparently holds that the convert may eat the food he previously cooked as a non-Jew, for the following reason: There is a question whether the prohibition is based on fear of ...


2

To reinforce the question, why do we spill for Dam vaEsh veSimros Ashan, which are not makkos of Egypt at all, but rather a prooftext that ובמופתים is a reference to דם. I think the answer is that the practice began with spilling / dipping for the makkos. To cite a note in a haggadah from 1590: "I have seen anshei maaseh accustomed to dipping the ...


2

See here. Kosher and Sherry Casks Rabbi Pinchas Teitz of Elizabeth, NJ, first reported in 1949 that there may be sherry wine in blended whisky – which would obviously create a problem for observant Jews who are also whisky lovers. It would then follow that any single malt Scotch that is exclusively matured or finished in sherry casks would ...


1

There's a good article that summarzies the opinions here: http://doseofhalacha.blogspot.co.uk/2013/07/kashrus-of-scotch.html Read through the comments, too: The Poskim agree that ordinary Scotch whisky (whether single malt or blended) which has no mention of any wine casks is perfectly Kosher. The question arises when whisky has been matured in wine ...


1

Rabbi Moshe Feinstein was addressing blended whiskey, but the issues are basically the same with regards to a sherry-cask scotch as far as I know. Rabbi Feinstein said it was allowable, but not preferable; he personally made reasonable attempts to avoid such a product (as a chumrah) , and gave his blessing to those who would make a product certified as free ...


1

A Kos Shel Paraniut is a concept in Brochos 51b, however it is not tied there to Pesach, rather to זוגות. The Lubavitcher Rebbe brings in his Hagada what appears to be primary sources for the concept of tying it to the second cup (and not as you might think, just because it is the second cup, making a pair - see Rashi Brochos there which implies that the ...


1

Initially, I thought it had to do with the centrality of the 5 grains, but that would then demand that ALL grain products have a special bracha. I found this discussion of Pat akum which discusses why bread is important enough to be covered by such an edict, and in it the author writes "The Rif (Avoda Zara 14b) and Tosafot (Avoda Zara 35b s.v. Michlal) ...


1

There is a long article on the “reasons” for the “Nazir” not being allowed to drink wine and the other restrictions at the Yeshivat Har Etzion virtual beit hamedrash . Ultimately any reasons we can think of do not approach the intent of Hashem and this is the only "answer" I have seen to the last question that you ask. The article mentions many ideas of ...


1

I believe, quite frankly, that the question is based on the incorrect assumption that the Sages instituted a prohibition against tasting anything after the last bite of Matzah (which we colloquially call the Afikomen). This is not correct, as can be demonstrated by the simple fact that that's not how the Seder, arranged by the Sages, goes. The Mishnah ...


1

In order to avoid situations of mixed-marriages , which almost certainly lead to assimilation , the Rabbis enacted many decrees whose goal was to inhibit the forming of close relationships between Jews and non-Jews. The laws of stam yeinam (wine that was produced or handled by Non-Jews) are included in these decrees. On the other hand, the Torah, and in ...


1

One does not fulfill the mitzvah of drinking with grape juice. Shevet HaLevi 10:107:2, Shalmei Moed page 288, Halichos Shlomo Moadim 19:footnote 76, Rivevos Ephraim 8:600 Source: Halachically Speaking 10:3 pg 12 (pdf)



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