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11

Nitei Gavriel Nesuin 2 - 80:21:38 says that the source for saying L'Chaim on wine is Sefer Hapardes L'Rashi, Ravia Brachos 120, Tanya Rabsi 24, Bach Orach Chaim 174. The reason is that since wine brought a curse on the world when Noach drank and cursed Canaan therefore we say L'Chaim when we drink it. He also mentions in the name of the Baal Shem Tov not to ...


7

I heard the following: Wine and frankincense were administered to a person condemned to the death penalty Sanhedrin 43a This is an association between wine and death. So we say when we drink wine, L'chaim "to Life."


7

I will offer a partial answer to the question. Many states have exceptions to the underage drinking law that for religious purposes it is allowed. Many states also have an exception when on private, non alcohol-selling premises, with parental consent. I got this information here: http://drinkingage.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=002591. Although ...


6

In regards to your "first" question, the reason that we do not say hagafen before they are processed should really be asked the other way around, which is why do we make hagafen after it is processed, as opposed to any other fruit which does not get a more specialized blessing? The answer is given in Berachos 35b that since wine is סעיד ומשמח, typically ...


6

A primary source would be the מדרש תנחומה in פרשת פקודי at סימן ב העת שחוקרין העדים על העבירה שאדם עושה, יוצאין הסנהדרין וכל ישראל עמם לרחוב העיר, ומוציאין לשם לאיש שהוא מחוייב סקילה או אחד מארבע מיתות בית דין, ויוצאין שנים מהם או שלשה הגדולים מהם ודורשין לעדים. וכששבין מלחקור, אומר להם, סברי מרנן. והם אומרים, אם לחיים לחיים, ואם למיתה למיתה. אם הוא ...


6

The Rosh ,based on the two sevaras given in Avoda Zara for the issur, explains that the issur of yayin nesech is not solely an issue of avoda zara but additionally an issue of mingling with non-Jews (משום בנותיהן). If this is so, he asks, why would mevushal wine be any less likely to cause mingling between jews and non-jews? He also asks even if one just ...


5

Wine becomes yayin nesech when it is open and then is handled by a non-Jew or by a Jew who violates Shabbat or participates in avoda zara. "Messianic Judaism" could certainly be considered a form of avoda zara as discussed in other places on this site. So if the person touches an open bottle of wine, that wine would become prohibited. If the wine is ...


5

(By the way -- a sealed bottle of kosher wine can be handled by anyone, hence I am allowed to walk into any store in the planet and buy a sealed bottle of wine marked "OU kosher" [assuming they didn't counterfeit it, assuming the seal is intact, etc.] regardless of the faith of the shopkeeper. I'm assuming you mean wine that was handled by Muslims ...


4

Grape Juice From Concentrate Rabbi Dovid Cohen Administrative Rabbinical Coordinator of the cRc November 2007 Over the years, there has been considerable debate regarding the bracha on grape juice produced from concentrate, and whether such juice is suitable for Kiddush and daled kosos. As many consumers use grape juice for exactly those ...


4

Apparently according to certain poskim, hagafen. http://www.crcweb.org/kosher_articles/grape_juice_concentrate.php "Summary ... [In a reversal of a longstanding position], Rav Schwartz has accepted these proofs and arguments, and ruled that the proper bracha on grape juice from concentrate is hagafen, and that such juice may be used for kiddush and daled ...


4

Yes, see Bamidbar 6:3 ג מיין ושכר יזיר, חמץ יין וחמץ שכר לא ישתה he shall abstain from wine and strong drink: he shall drink no vinegar of wine, or vinegar of strong drink (JPS 1917) For elaboration, see Mishneh Torah Hilchos Nezirus Chapter 5.


4

Wine may be pasteurized at different temperatures. Igros Moshe maintains that above 175 degrees Fahrenheit the juice is considered mevushal. The Tzelemer Rav maintains that it is not mevushal. The following is the position the OU states Kedem follows (source): The Grape Juice bottles that state on their labels Mevushal are accepted by all as ...


4

Rambam Hilchos De'os 5:3 וכל המשתכר, הרי זה חוטא ומגונה ומפסיד חכמתו; ואם משתכר בפני עמי הארץ, הרי זה חילל את השם. Anyone who gets drunk, he is a sinner and is disgusting and loses his wisdom. And if he does so before commoners, he profanes G-d. According to the Rambam, the mitzvah of simcha on Yom Tov does not encourage or even permit drinking ...


3

Sukka (49a-b) describes this and mentions that the young Kohanim would clear out the congealed wine from the shitin (a large cavern beneath the altar, into which the libations would run, see Rashi 49a s.v. שיתין) every 70 years. In a b'raisa, Rabbi El'azar bar Tzadok describes the "congealed wine" as "similar in form to cakes of pressed figs": אמר רבה בר ...


3

Halachafortoday sources the Mishna Brurah 320:56 : ‏(נו) מותר - וכן מותר ליתן יין אדום בתוך יין לבן ואע״פ שמתאדם [ואפילו אם מכוין לכתחלה לעשות מראה בהמאכל או בהמשקה ג״כ מסתברא דאין להחמיר כן נראה מהפמ״ג ולפי מה שכתב בנ״א נכון למנוע מזה] ומ״מ אין רשאי לעשות מראה ביי״ש ודבש שיקנו ממנו [פמ״ג ע״ש טעמו וגם בלא״ה הוא עובדא דחול] וכ״ש שלא להשים סממנים ...


3

According to this article by Rabbi Shlomo Riskin, Rav Soloveitchik explained the special nature of bread as relating to the degree of human involvement required to turn G-d's creation (stalks of wheat) into edible bread. Rav Soloveitchik explained as follows: Concerning the Seven Species, the partnership between G-d and humans is limited, with the ...


2

Seems that either they use wine/grape juice concentrate (assuming it was Halachicly cooked when it's concentrated) or else they use Kosher Wine under supervision. Once wine is added to the mix (or spices to the wine) it no longer has the problem of s'tam yenam, and no longer needs tight "Kosher Wine" supervision, as explained below: See Shulchan Aruch, ...


2

the chasam sofer responsa YD 317 and 184 claims that regarding a gentile the time of gadlus is not connected to age rather to intelligence


2

There's a good article that summarzies the opinions here: http://doseofhalacha.blogspot.co.uk/2013/07/kashrus-of-scotch.html Read through the comments, too: The Poskim agree that ordinary Scotch whisky (whether single malt or blended) which has no mention of any wine casks is perfectly Kosher. The question arises when whisky has been matured in wine ...


2

You're probably looking for the bottom of 49a.


2

See here. Kosher and Sherry Casks Rabbi Pinchas Teitz of Elizabeth, NJ, first reported in 1949 that there may be sherry wine in blended whisky – which would obviously create a problem for observant Jews who are also whisky lovers. It would then follow that any single malt Scotch that is exclusively matured or finished in sherry casks would ...


2

This is a Machlokes, explained at length here. Basically the American custom is to be lenient in the matter like Rav Moshe Feinstein's Psak, that cooking at 175 degrees Fahrenheit/80 Celsius is sufficient. It is also the practice in Israel to be lenient. There are plenty of more strict opinions on the matter, however. Regarding the transparency, the ...


2

This depends on how exactly you hold that wine becomes yayin akum. Under the opinion that I personally follow, which I don't actually know the source of but was told by my LOR, the akum just looking at it is enough to make it "treyf vi chazzer" (non-kosher like pork). I've heard that this is actually a stringency, and that it just needs to be served to the ...


2

Nit'e Gavriel, Ben Ham'tzarim volume 1, chapter 39, paragraph 6: It's appropriate to be careful not to eat food kneaded with wine or grape juice from rosh chodesh [Av] and on. In a footnote, he indicates that this comes from applying Magen Avraham 551:29 — that food cooked with meat is forbidden by custom — to wine. He then notes that ...


1

Friday night -- either wine, or challah. Shabbos morning kiddush, as well as havdalah -- better with wine. Acceptable with any "beverage of the land." (How do you balance "better" vs. "acceptable"? AYLOR.) Beer definitely works as "beverage of the land." Hard liquor -- there's a discussion about how much you'd have to drink. Rabbi Ovadiah Yosef quotes some ...


1

Rabbi Shlomo Zalman Auerbach zt'l allowed adding concentrated syrup to water or seltzer on shabbos, saying "this is no different than anyone who mixes water with wine or hot water with tea essence."


1

Rabbi Moshe Feinstein was addressing blended whiskey, but the issues are basically the same with regards to a sherry-cask scotch as far as I know. Rabbi Feinstein said it was allowable, but not preferable; he personally made reasonable attempts to avoid such a product (as a chumrah) , and gave his blessing to those who would make a product certified as free ...


1

A Kos Shel Paraniut is a concept in Brochos 51b, however it is not tied there to Pesach, rather to זוגות. The Lubavitcher Rebbe brings in his Hagada what appears to be primary sources for the concept of tying it to the second cup (and not as you might think, just because it is the second cup, making a pair - see Rashi Brochos there which implies that the ...


1

This may come from Genesis 14:18: וּמַלְכִּי-צֶדֶק מֶלֶךְ שָׁלֵם, הוֹצִיא לֶחֶם וָיָיִן; וְהוּא כֹהֵן, לְאֵל עֶלְיוֹן. And Melchizedek king of Salem brought out bread and wine; now he was a priest of God Most High.



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