Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

The Aruch HaShulchan says that since wine and other drinks were expensive and they only drank water, they did not Bentch on a Kos. HaRav Moshe Feinstein Zatzal says that since for hundreds of years due to the lack of wine Jews relied on the Poskim that say you do not need a Kos -- therefore even today when wine is readily available we retain the Halacha ...


10

The gemara (P'sachim 119b) mentions the prohibition of eating after the the final matzah (which is known nowadays as the afikoman). There are different opinions among the poskim as to the reason for this. The Rashbam (ad loc., s.v. אין מפטירין אחר המצה אפיקומן) writes that the reason is to prevent attenuating the taste of the matzah, which is eaten as a ...


10

"There is a huge machlokes in the Poskim regarding exactly this issue if grape juice only maintains its special status as a liquid or even when hardened. Therefore, it would be ideal to make borei pri hagafen on liquid grape juice and shehakol on something else before eating the ices. In the likelihood that this is not practical, one should say shehakol." ...


10

This holds true for wine that is not mevushal, boiled. If a non-Jew touches an open bottle of mevushal wine, there is no problem. Note, this is not a melacha, that is, an action forbidden on the sabbath, but a separate prohibition related to the laws of kashrut and concerns over idolatry. There is much to be said on the subject (including an explanation of ...


10

Kosher wine that is Mevushal, "cooked"*, is fine to touch. The underlying issue is that an enactment was put in place in Talmudic times to prevent Yayin Nesech (wine used for idolotrous purposes) and extended also to prevent intermarriage and out-conversion (meaning that, even if you know that the gentile serving you wine is not going to engage in idolatry, ...


10

The Gemara (Bava Batra 97b) says: סוחט אדם אשכול של ענבים ואומר עליו קידוש היום One can squeeze a cluster of grapes and say Kiddush on it. The Shulchan Aruch rules this way in OC 272:2 So it seems that letting the juice ferment is not a prerequisite for ritual use.


10

Nitei Gavriel Nesuin 2 - 80:21:38 says that the source for saying L'Chaim on wine is Sefer Hapardes L'Rashi, Ravia Brachos 120, Tanya Rabsi 24, Bach Orach Chaim 174. The reason is that since wine brought a curse on the world when Noach drank and cursed Canaan therefore we say L'Chaim when we drink it. He also mentions in the name of the Baal Shem Tov not to ...


8

The Torah prohibits wine offered as a libation to idols (Shemos 34:15). Based on a generalization that non-Jews are devout practitioners of there religion, wine made, touched, poured, or tapped by someone who is not an observant Jew was prohibited by the Sages (Shulchan Aruch, Yoreh Deah 123:1, see also Chochmas Adam 76:1) out of concern that it might have ...


8

It seems pretty clear that 'Ad DeLo Yada' is fulfilled through alcohol, not wine per se. I've heard that wine is preferable, and even that one does not fulfill the requirement if one gets drunk on whisk(e)y. This seems very strange to me, as the point is to get so joyfully drunk that one is unable to distinguish between two polar opposite characters. Unless ...


8

The Baal Hatanya, in his Shulchan Aruch (190:4), states that the cup can be passed to a child. (In footnote כז there it is noted that this is by analogy with various other cases where this may be done, such as havdalah on Motzaei Shabbos of the Nine Days, or a bris on Tisha B'Av.) The reason, he says, is: לפי שגם על המברך לא חל החיוב כלל שלא חייבוהו אלא ...


7

At the risk of being boring, the Bartenura Moscato ("blue bottle") is usually well-received. Mevushal. Easy to find at most kosher wine places these days. For those who prefer something Israeli, there's the Carmel analogue (yes mevushal) of the "blue bottle", and the Gamla (non-mevushal).


7

I have no idea what the kosher certifications are or aren't; I'm not speaking to any of that. According to Wikipedia, Martini is made from four ingredients: wine, botanicals, sugar and alcohol. It's a vermouth, i.e. a flavored wine. I see no reason why the bracha would not be the same borei pri hagafen (or hagefen for Sephardim) as other wine or grape ...


7

According to Alshich, Yaakov was worried that Yitchak might notice that the dish he was served was actually goat meat, which is not an animal that one hunts, as Yitchak had told Eisav to. Therefore, Yaakov served wine with it in the hopes that with the taste of the wine mixed in, Yitzchak wouldn't pick up on the nuances of the taste of the meat he was ...


6

Maybe the reason to fall asleep specifically through the process of drinking wine is to remember the miracle which was done through wine at the different wine parties in the Book of Esther as outlined here: Can you use Liquor to fulfill Ad Dlo Yoda? EDIT: I challenge your assumption that the two rules are separated. The Rambam writes in Megillah 2:15: ...


6

The דרכי משה ( in אורח חיים ס' תעד ס'ק יח ) brings the custom based on the מהרי'ל and the custom of the מהר'ש. He also states that the מהר'ש based it on the ספר אבי'ה - presumably the ראבי'ה. There are two things being symbolized. The use of the finger symbolizes the 'finger of G-d' and the number of times has a gematria of 16. The דרכי משה explains ...


6

From the Baal Hatanya's Haggadah: ויכוון, שהכוס הוא סוד המלכות, ושופך מהיין שבתוכו סוד האף והזעם שבה על ידי כח הבינה לתוך כלי שבור סוד הקליפה שנקראת ארור One should have in mind that the cup represents sod hamalchut (the secret of sovereignty), and the wine that is being poured into the broken vessel represents the secret of anger and ...


6

I heard the following: Wine and frankincense were administered to a person condemned to the death penalty Sanhedrin 43a This is an association between wine and death. So we say when we drink wine, L'chaim "to Life."


5

Tirgum Yonathan to this pasuk: ".. and he didn't have wine, and a Malach came and gave him wine that was kept from the days of Bereshit Haolam (days of Creation?) and put it into Ya'akov's hand and he gave it to his father...". A similar commentary we find in Da'at Zekenim Meba'alei Hatosafot. Here we learn that the Malach was Michael. They add that a ...


5

I don't know for certain (CYLOR, of course), but some possible relevant sources: Rambam (Hil. Nezirus 5:2) groups together wine and "coagulated wine," classifying them both as "fruit" (as opposed to vinegar, which is considered "waste products of the fruit"). In a few places the Gemara also refers to "coagulated wine." Two of these (Sukkah 49a and Me'ilah ...


5

Even if it is not cooked, a non-Jew merely touching the bottle is not enough to prohibit it. I am not writing a source because it is an inferred answer: If one would look up the Halachos of Yayin Nesech/Stam Yanum in Yorah Deah he will see that what is forbidden is poured wine (and the wine that was in the neck of the bottle as it was being poured and went ...


5

From here: The Gemara states (Avodah Zara 57a) : "Rav Kahana and R. Asi said to Rav: You yourself said that a one day old Nochri makes Yayin Nesech (if he touches wine, even though he has no intention)! Rav: I meant only that one may not drink it, but one may benefit from it." Shmuel disagrees and holds that "only adults make Yayin Nesech, but children ...


5

You bring up a much more fundamental question than the other answers have dealt with. If the reason to forbid wine touched by certain people is lest they libated part of it to Avoda Zara, then should the wine be forbidden to the toucher himself if he knows that he did not libate it? Rabbi Moshe Feinstein deals with this question (Igrot Moshe OC V 37:8) ...


5

Your question was asked of the Ohr Somayach "Ask the Rabbi" who answers about three things: 1) Extinguishing the havdalah candle immediately after havdalah 2) Extinguishing it in wine 3) Not blowing out candles in general On 2, he says, ""Wine spilling like water," says the Talmud, "is a sign of blessing." In order to start the week off right, we ...


5

Proper procedure? I don't think there is a preference. Hamotzi does not exempt wine ever (Shulchan Aruch OC 174:1) and if you drank wine before the bread it continues to exempt wine drunk after the bread (:4). Also, the after blessing on the bread exempts the wine, even if wine was only drunk before the bread, and certainly if it was drunk during the meal ...


5

Rivivos Efraim Orach Chaim 2 - 137 attributes this Minhag to the Baal Kneses HaGedola 261 with the following two reasons. One is not to drink wine that the name of the Makos were mentioned on. Also since it is disgusting since he dipped his finger into it. Sefer Mekorei Minhagim - 44 mentions this in the name of the Arizal.


4

The question and the answers mostly deal with the spiritual aspects of wine. I am not disagreeing with them. But, it should also be remembered that although wine is a vegetarian product, it still must be prepared in accordance with the laws of kashrus. In other words, all equipment and any additives need to be in accordance with kashrus. The equipment ...


4

The Chazon Ish (quoted in Imrei Yosher, pg. 4) says that those who say Havdalah every week over wine or grape juice should do the same during the Nine Days as well. In some places it is customary for a minor, if one is present, to drink the wine. The minor who serves the purpose should be a boy beyond the age of chinuch but who is not yet old enough to ...


4

I enjoy white Zinfandel. It comes in a nice pink shade, and it's got just enough sweetness to pull out of being truly dry. Baron Herzog makes it in California, and Carmel makes it in Israel. It looks like they can be found for under $10 and under $15, respectively.


4

See here. In summary, the answers vary from tasting (a small sip), a cheekful (varies per person and is usually assumed to be the majority of the reviit), a reviit (86.4 mL). Kiddush Friday (or Yom Tov) Night -- ideally a cheekful, ex post facto even a reviit. Kiddush Shabbat (or Yom Tov) Day -- ideally a cheekful, ex post facto even a reviit. Havdalah -- ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible