Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Metzudat David on Ecclesiastes 3:1 states for explaining the phrase: "There is a time for every purpose: ועת לכל חפץ . לכל הדברים שהאדם חפץ בו גם לזה יש עת , כי לא בכל עת יחפוץ בדבר אחד כי פעם יחפוץ בדבר מה ופעם בחלופו , וכאשר יפרש במקראות שלאחריו : I am translating only the bold phrase: "There is a time when someone will desire in one thing, and another ...


0

I think the postulate in the question is a false dichotomy. There is no reason that "Rah" can't have more than one antonym. War and fighting is bad. Peace is good. There is no reason to not use both as antonyms. So the idea of saying that Tov is not an antonym of "Rah" is simply not supported by any observation of additional antonyms, and any conclusions ...


0

El means power. It is used as a descriptiona as well as a name for G-d, humans, angels and even pagan gods. The plural of el is elim (powers or gods), and not “elohim." Hebrew has a full conjugation (with different forms for 1st, 2nd and 3rd person, singular and plural, masculine and feminine). A noun by itself isn't plural (so an "im" ending doesn't ...


8

See here for more. Biblical Hebrew employs a rule called the "vav ha-hipuch." The preceding "v'" flips the tense from past to future, or vice versa. Thus "yehi chen", it will be so; "vayhi chen", it was so. "Amar Paroh", Pharaoh said; "v'amar Paroh livnei yisrael" -- Pharoh will say regarding the Jews. "Moshe yedaber", Moses would speak. "Vaydaber Moshe" ...


0

Is one word a noun and the other an adjective? Yes, exactly. Wiktionary explains that קדוש is an adjective, and קודש is a noun. So, קְדֹשִׁ֤ים יִהְיוּ֙ לֵאלֹ֣הֵיהֶ֔ם means they shall be holy (adj.) to their God. וְהָ֥יוּ קֹֽדֶשׁ means they shall be holy (n.).


0

In terms of the difference between the tow words for what we call in English, "work" here are some quotes from websites exploring this: http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/95906/jewish/Melacha-A-Unique-Definition-of-Work.htm "The Hebrew language has two words for "work"--avodah and melachah. Avodah is a general term meaning work, while ...


6

The word is אֵת. When the word is "joined" with the next word with a makaf "־" then they become treated as one long word, and there is no longer an accent on that syllable. Unaccented closed syllables (unlike accented closed syllables) take short vowels, so the vowel shifts to its shorter counterpart: tzere -> segol. You can also see this same phenomenon in ...


12

When the word stands on its own, with its own trup-mark, it's אֵת, with a tzeireh. When it's attached to the next word with a dash and therefore does not have its own trup-mark, it's אֶת, with a segol. I think I learned this in high school; unfortunately, I don't know a more precise source. I'm not sure what would be the underlying reason behind some ...



Top 50 recent answers are included