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This means that the word "water" is a general term. Thus, "There was no water (at all) for the congregation to drink just as in verse 5 ומים אין לשתות. Water as in sentence 8 ונתן מימיו is considered plural because it was a constant flow of water(s). The difference is in the usage of the word as a single entity as opposed to something that is made up of a ...


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The second, בְּמַיִם, means "in/with/at water(s)". The first, בַּמַּיִם, has the definite article, and means "in/with/at THE water(s)". It would typically be used when talking about water which has already been mentioned. It is very normal in Hebrew for the definite article to be swallowed up into an prefix, there is nothing special about 'water' in this ...


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When Moshe Rabbeinu says אתה והם he is only talking to Korach. Here he is addressing Korach and his crew. There is no other easy for the Torah to describe this. He is addressing them by calling on them as "כל עדתו". He might be also hinting at the message of the wife of On ben Peles, that they don't gain by fighting Moshe since they are still not leaders. ...


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Rav Hirsch connects 16 and 17 to state that this is addressed to everyone who would even think of backing Korach. The pretense was of "equal rights" but the truth was that only one person would survive attempting to bring the incense. Remember, that even Nadav and Avihu, who were eligible to inherit the role of Kohen Gadol, died as a result of improperly ...


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Kitzur Baal Haturim on Genesis 27:3:3: ציד צידה כתיב ה''א יתירה שלמדו ה' הלכות שחיטה וה' סימני טהרה בעוף, אינו דורס. אצבע יתירה. זפק. קרקבו נקלף. אינו חולק את רגליו. ובחיה, מפרסת פרסה. מעלה גרה. ואין לה שינים למעלה. קרנים. ובשרה הולך שתי וערב תחת העוקץ: An extra "heh" was written at the end of the word to hint that Yitzhak was teaching ...


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Radak on Genesis 24:33:1: ויישם, כתיב, וכן ויישם בארון (שמות כ"ה) שרש ישם; וקרי ויושם מבנין הפעל, הושם לפניו לאכול על יד נערי הבית. ויושם , the word is spelled ויישם, “he placed,” although it is read as vayussam, “it was placed.” We find a similar anomaly in Genesis 50,26 when placing Joseph’s remains in a coffin is reported. The root of the ...


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Rashi on Genesis 8:17:1: היצא. הוצא כתיב היצא קרי היצא, אמור להם שיצאו. הוצא, אם אינם רוצים לצאת הוציאם אתה: Summary of above: הוצא is written to convey the idea that you should just tell the animals to leave (Who says animals don't understand Hebrew?) However, if they don't leave, היצא, you should (forcefully?) take them out, yourself.


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I, too was puzzled by the use of this term, here, and Sefaria translates this as "destroy", which is not the usual translation of this word. However, based on what I see in Haamek Davar on Numbers 14:12:2: ואורישנו. אין הפי׳ ואורישנו אליך. והיאך יעלה עה״ד להרוג טף ונשים ועוד כמה צדיקים שלא חטאו גם שבט לוי. אלא ה״פ ואורישנו לבניהם שישארו הטף ...


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Archaelogy has seen this textual oddity of yours play out repeteadly in their findings. While there are many different statues, jars, and depictions that are found in ancient Israel, there has been one phrase that has shown up repeatedly, which is "His Asheirah." You can find an example of this with this ancient storage jar. The storage jar shows three ...


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In Biblical Hebrew, when using a preposition such as "to" or "on" followed by the name of a place, Modern Hebrew would have used the word בגג . In Biblical Hebrew, the letter ה is added to the end of the place, instead. So, the meaning , here, is "He called to Samuel on the roof". Compare this, for example, with Breishit 28:2, and see Rashi's grammar ...



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