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The correct spelling of the word is חֲלִיפֹות, which is found in 1 Melachim 14:13. The Masoretic Text in Bereishit 45:22 therefore indicates in the margin (the “small Masorah”) that the two appearances of this word in this particular verse are variants (since the Hebrew Bible was written over a thousand year period). Please click to enlarge the image, ...


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When it's chaser it means the objects are similar like by the luchos. The Shevatim are diffrent sizes but Binyamin got 5 of the same size since it was only for him . (Torah Temimah)


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An answer is proposed in the sefer שעשועי על התורה, on this week's parshah. The gemara (Megilah 16a) that says that בנימין got five pieces of clothing, whereas the other brothers only got one apiece, to symbolize that in the future, מרדכי would go out with five pieces of clothing. The Gra asks on this that the symbolism is nice and everything, but how was ...


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I'd heard it discussed. If I recall correctly, the suggestion was that while the song is generally describing the Jewish people as a collective entity, each person needs to give thanks in their own way.


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I don't think that this is anything more than language / grammar. In the first 5, the rules are stated in noun or "title" form - like headlines. It is like saying, "These are the rules from which we can derive..." From A, From B... etc. - They are not describing how these rules work; they are just telling you the name of the rule, and assuming that you know ...


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Many verbs in Hebrew and English (and, I assume just about every language) have "combo" verbs that can be transitive or intransitive, depending on the sentence context. זכר means "remembered". Within the context of the verse you are talking about, assume that we substituted the phrase לא זכר שר המשקים "The chief "bartender" (OK, it's an exaggeration of ...


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The Rosh and Chizkuni (in his second explanation) and Daas Z'kenim answer that the maidservants' sons didn't bow, as they thought that they, as freemen, were more important than their mothers. That's why it says "bowed" in the feminine: only women bowed. [Presumably "and their children" in the verse refers to approaching.] Chizkuni's first explanation is ...


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I think that grammar is a major part of the answer and can lead to a theological insight. It is pretty clear to me that even without the hey (called the hey ha'yediah), the phrases should be translated and understood as "THE ..." As a simple example without getting bogged down with too much grammar, think about the very familiar text, Baruch atah Hashem, ...


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An Italian siddur written in 1471 includes in the dawn blessings, "she'asitani isha velo ish", 'that You made me a woman and not a man' (as well as the changes "shifha" for "eved" and "nokhrit" for "goy", as mentioned by others). So, I don't think we should be quick to say that using language applicable to women was a late change.



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