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R Menachem Di Lonzano writes in his Derekh Chayim 108b that the Tipcha is on "Ani" so as to not sound like "I am God, your god, [and not that other god who is also your god]". He concludes: ולכן בכל אני ה' אלהיכם יש טרחא במלת אני לבד כשיבא מלת כי בתביר קודם לה לפי שאי אפשר לטרחא לבא אחר תביר אם לא במאריך באמצע.‏ And therefore in all "Ani Hashem ...


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I will try to combine translation and cantilation analysis. The answer of @DoubleAA is of hight level. Without his help, I could not find the verse in Melachim and understand. But my conclusion, following Rashi in Vayera and the Targum on Melachim is different. For this reason, let me formulate my own response. The verse in Vayera (Genesis 18, ...


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The letters בגדכפת take a Dagesh Kal at the start of a word, unless they follow a word ending in אהוי. There are four major exceptions to this rule when the Dagesh Kal is there even after a word ending in אהוי, the first of which (called "Mafsik") is when the previous word had a pausal Trop note on it. So in Gen 18:5 or Jos 5:14 where the phrase means "No, ...


2

Indeed it has to do with the "Vav HaHippukh" (waw-consecutive). Were those words pronounced Mil'eil, they would be in past tense (eg. Lev 10:19 , Hos 12:11) instead of the future tense. Thus, changing the accent is actually a correctable reading mistake.


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If he would of say "פרה ורבה" I would understand that only adom but not his children so it said in plural form to inclined the next generations


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The simple answer seems to be that we never say one of the avos "ran to" an animal. It would sound very degrading.


1

Hidāyat al-Qāriʾ (see Eldar's edition) indicates that the regular resh pronunciation was articulated at the middle of the tongue. This is farther out than the articulation for fricative gimel (IPA: ɣ) or the fricative kaf (IPA: x), which was articulated "at the back third of the tongue". This suggests that resh had an advanced uvular articulation. It is ...


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The furtive hiriq is a way to indicate the pronunciation that diverges from the received consonantal tradition, sometimes called a qere perpetuum. Another qere perpetuum is the name יִשָּׂשכָר which is always pronounced with one ש. It appears that the original pronunciation for the name ירושלם was indeed "Yerušalem", coming from the name Shalem (Jerusalem ...


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The historical elision of a vowel preceding ד could explain the absence of a dagesh qal within it. Similar phenomena are seen in words like בִּנְפֹל and מַלְכֵי. The latter probably was pronounced like malak̲e at some point, since the absolute plural form מְלָכִים has an a vowel before k̲. See, for instance, p. 40 from Greenstein's "An Introduction to the ...



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