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11

Well, we do have the precedent that four-fifths (or even more) of the Jews in fact did not want to leave Egypt and serve Hashem, and died during the Plague of Darkness (Rashi to Exodus 13:18, quoting from Midrashim Mechilta and/or Tanchuma). So based on the attitude that this second son shows towards the mitzvos of Pesach, there is indeed a good likelihood ...


10

The criterion for a Sanhedrin to have the powers that you enumerated (and a lot of others too) is that its members have semichah (ordination) that goes back, in succession, to Moshe Rabbeinu. Such semichah also has to be given specifically in the Land of Israel, so it died out when the Jewish communities there dwindled (depending whom you ask, anywhere from ...


9

A large part of Shimon lived in Yehudah's boundaries, true (as described in Josh. 19:1-9). But in I Chron. 4:31, after (more-or-less) the same list of cities is repeated, the verse adds a crucial detail: "These were their cities until the reign of David." Pseudo-Rashi and Metzudas David explain that in this period the Tribe of Yehudah's population increased ...


8

Maybe that's just it. With exile having been our dominant mode of existence for most of our history, there is a real danger that we'll come to see that as the norm. By having - and learning about - so many mitzvos, with the details richly given, that we can't perform in galus, then that drives home the point that things are not how they should be, which in ...


7

Here's what I heard from Rabbi Yitzchak Breitowitz on the subject: The Aruch HaShulchan (living in Russia a hundred years ago) wrote that if a government's laws are fair to everyone, "like England's laws, or the Glorious Czar's", then no prohibition of mesira ("snitching") applies. Some feel that the entire sentence was written to placate the censor, and ...


6

Madanei Asher page 168 discusses this question and answers as follows. Shaalos U'Tshuvis Radbaz - Volume 2 #772 says that a Jewish king is not judged and therefore would not go to exile. Regarding prior to the time of Yanai Hamelech when Jewish kings were judged he says even there a Jewish king would not be exiled based on the Gemara - Makos 10a that a ...


6

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exilarch The last exilarch (Reish Galusa) whose name is recorded is Hezekiah. He was imprisoned and tortured to death in 1040. He was the last exilarch. However daat.ac.il says that it ended earlier by the leaders of the Jews due to fears of the Muslims. בשנת 941 מת נשיא הגולה דוד בן זכאי, ורב סעדיה גאון, איש ריבו ...


6

Rabbi Michael Broyde (a Justice of the Beth Din of America) has a full article of the topic available in English here. He surveys a wide range of opinions from R Eliezer Waldenberg (author of Tzitz Eliezer), who holds that the prohibition of reporting does not apply in a just society, to that of R Moshe Feinstein (author of Igrot Moshe), who holds that the ...


6

Many of the assumptions in your question are questionable, however the Midrashim are full of stories regarding the harshness of Egypt. One Midrash states that things were so bad, the men and women refused to have children with eachother. (This is one reason why Moshe's birth is itself a miracle) Slavery it'self was pretty horrid. The Midrashim state that ...


5

There is the Biblical commandment on tithing produce grown in the land of Israel (irrespective of the Temple's standing). Israeli farmers still tithe today; however, as the tithed produce has no special religious properties, a farmer can say "I won't give this to a Levi until/unless he proves that he's truly a Levi", and as that doesn't happen today, the ...


3

From the words of the Malbim on Shas it would be an extention of the Torah law of keeping oneself out of danger. Again from the same Malbim: Because the "chain" must not be broken until they conclude Talmud Bavli. a. According to the Rambam, yes; according to Rashi (quoted in Lechem Mishne), only if there are Yeshivos. b. According to (above) Malbim, ...


3

Perhaps on a pseudo-philosophical level: The only way I can get a reward for a mitzva that I didn't do myself is if I connect myself to the broader body of the Jewish people. This works not only laterally (I can't do the mitzva of the Kohen's blessing, but I know someone who can), but also temporally -- I have to connect to the entire Jewish people, which ...


3

Shulchan Aruch Harav Choshen Mishpat, The Laws of Damages to Body and Soul, Paragraph 11, quoting the Rambam and the Shulchan Aruch, writes: וכן המוסר אפילו ממון קל של ישראל ביד נכרים אם הוחזק במסירות ג' פעמים מיתתו בכל אדם מפני שהוא כרודף כמו שנתבאר בהלכות נזקי ממון Whoever reports even a small amount of Jewish money to the Non-Jews, if he did it 3 ...


2

The Rasha says mah haavodah hazot lachem, "what is this offering to you?" Thus, he has no portion in the korban, as the haggadah interprets it "to you and not to him". Meanwhile, in makkat bechorot, Hashem only skipped over the houses of those who had offered the paschal offering. He would not have made it to the geulah.


2

Rav Kanievsky answers it says in Medrash Eicha(פ"ד סי' כ) That the Jews had a treaty with Egypt's King Pharaoh the Limp and an enemy attacked the Jews they called on Egypt an the Egyptians were coming to save them. Hashem caused the bodies of the Egyptians who had drowned at the splitting of the sea to surface one asked the other who are these people they ...


2

hilchos meisira is very complicated and a rov has to be consulted. A mosser has a din of a non jew (yoreh deah 281:3) it is a very bad thing to be a mosser. However when there are laws in the land and chillul Hashem then it becomes a diff story.(choshen Misphat 388:12). See meseches Bava Matzia 83b the story with Rabbi Elazar and the king and the Ritva on ...


2

One thing you have to consider when you discuss the people who were exiled after the desctruction of the first temple is that they were exiled to Bavel. Of all the places they could have gone to, they were exiled to a place where they spoke the language and were able to communicate with other people already there. That had a big impact on a lot of people. ...


2

There is a three way argument of the source of Maaser on money (Is it from the Torah, Rabbanan, or custom). Either way one is fulfilling the commandment of giving tzedakah (which is obligated outside Israel). http://www.torah.org/advanced/weekly-halacha/5763/mishpatim.html


2

Edom is considered by the Rabbis to be the Roman Empire, and while contemporary Western culture isn't Roman per se, it is directly descended from Roman culture and ideas. Sources: It's stated here - http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/judaica/ejud_0002_0006_0_05562.html - that the late Tanaic and Amoraic Rabbis identified Edom as the founders of ...


2

The Maharatz Chajes discusses this in Maamar Torat Nevi'im, ch. 7: וכן ניחא נמי ליישב הא דלא מנו מוני המצות מה שאמרו חז"ל (כתובות קי"א ע"א) העולה מבבל לא"י עובר בעשה שנאמר בבלה יובאו ושמה יהיו עד יום פקדי אותם, והיינו דמצוה זאת היא היפך ממצות התורה שנצטוינו בשעת מתן תורה לרשת את הארץ ולהאחז בה, ואם לא היינו חוטאים היתה עדיין א"י מוחזקת אצלנו, וע"כ מצוה זאת ...


1

the slavery had many reasons. one of them is so that they would be able to become slaves of God. which in truth is the real freedom. True freedom does not mean doing whatever you want. True freedom means doing what you really want to do! What a person really wants to do, is to be good - to become more G-dly. However, the yetzer hara (inclination towards ...


1

Generally, the list of exiles corresponds with the four empires that Daniel envisioned (Daniel 2:37-43 and chs. 7-11). According to most commentators, they are: Babylonia, Persia/Media, Greece (Alexander the Great and his Hellenistic successors), and Rome and her cultural inheritors. Each of these indeed ruled over the majority of the world's Jews in its ...



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