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15

It depends on your boss and on local custom. If local custom generally accepts short personal business during work hours, and your boss never stipulated otherwise when you were hired, then it's OK. If local custom can't be determined, then you need to honestly assess whether your boss would mind. A posek once provided a rule of thumb: if the boss would ...


14

There are essentially two issues here: Am I somehow stealing from the owner (by taking away bandwidth)? Does the fact that the owner left it open mean he/she agrees to me using it? Am I somehow stealing from the ISP (or perhaps causing the owner to violate his/her TOS agreement with the ISP)? In each of these 2 problems we have yet another split: What ...


13

Its a gemara in Kesuvos 68a its a statement of Rav Elazar : דאמר רבי אלעזר בואו ונחזיק טובה לרמאין שאלמלא הן היינו חוטאין [- שאנו מעלימין עין מן העניים אבל עכשיו הרמאים גורמים לנו - רש"י] בכל יום שנאמר (דברים טו, ט) וקרא עליך אל ה' והיה בך חטא Rabbi Elazar says let's go and thank the cheaters - without them we would sin [because we hide our eyes ...


12

I believe it's been out of copyright for a while. You can access the whole book online here: http://www.tyndalearchive.com/TABS/Jastrow/ It's also available on Google Books, though I only found Vol. 2 there. Vol 1 and Vol 2 are available on Hebrewbooks.org.


11

The g'mara in B'rachot 5b relates the story of R. Huna, who seemed to be being punished for something (his wine soured). It was suggested that he had failed to pay a share-holder, to which he replied that said person had stolen from him. They cite a proverb that "if you steal from a thief you also have a taste of it". The g'mara relates that he pledged to ...


11

Eisav was "סמוך על שלחן אביו" - living at home at his parents' expense, therefore his finds and his gifts legally automatically belong to his parents - see Bava Metzia 12a/12b, R' Yom-Tob Asevilli ("Ritb"a") ibid. and Shul'han Aru'h 366:10.


10

Well you have to remember that in those days houses were not quite like they are today. The floors were earthen and they (the houses) were generally only 1 story high. So the simplest way to get into a house is to dig under the wall. Going through the front door is problematic: a) it's in a location where it's super-easy for the owner to notice (squeak) b) ...


9

There are several issues: If the person is paying by data used, he is losing through your download, so you are a damager and it would be forbidden Just because the person left it open doesn't mean he doesn't mind other people using it, he might just not know how to lock it. If there is a clause in his contract to the ISP not to let others use his ...


8

Some say that the Dor HaMabul had the halachik status of Bnei Yisroel, so they did have a shiur of Shava Prutah. Source: Rabbi Yechiel Halpern of Minsk (1660- 1747) in Sefer HaLikutim, Mabul, §1


8

This is called מציל עצמו בממון חבירו, saving yourself at the expense of someone else's property. Fred is indeed liable to pay Ernie for any damages, even if he was trying to save his own life (Shulchan Aruch, Choshen Mishpat 380:3), and certainly if it was just to save his own property from theft or confiscation (ibid. 292:8 and and 388:2).


8

1) Rav Sternbuch in Tshuvos V'hanhagos chelek 1:368 answers a question very similar to this one. The questioner(a Bal Tshuvah) asks if he can damage his parents television. The Rav answers that this is a machlokes between The Ketzos and the Nesivos in Choshen Mishpat siman 3(which discusses forcing someone to keep mitzvos).The Ketzos holds that the power of ...


7

I wrote to Business Halacha Institute and they answered that it is prohibited to do so. As requested, here is the conversation: Aside from the secular law ramifications (illegal in the US): I would be interested in knowing how cell phone jammers fit into halacha, and what the reasons behind forbidding [or permitting] their use would be. Also ...


7

I asked my local Orthodox rabbi. (FYI: he's Chareidi.) He said that ad-blocking software is permissible to use. He added that even if it's hard for webmasters to detect and work around adblockers, that's no problem for me: some things in life are hard. My rabbi said it was fine for me to post his ruling online. But he asked me not to mention his name ...


7

The Gemara says that a non-Jew is liable to death for stealing less than a penny. "אמר רבי חייא בר אבא אמר רבי יוחנן בן נח נהרג על פחות משוה פרוטה ולא ניתן להשבון" The Rambam agrees.


7

No, you may not use the internet. Yes, you have to repay the neighbor, especially if the neighbor is charged for the amount of data used. If the neighbor has an unlimited plan, you may still have to pay, although determining an actual monetary amount may be tricky. Very simple analogy to explain this: If I lock my door, and you pick the lock and break ...


6

To show how much they love the mitzva. (Mekor Chaim - Chavos Yair) Based on the Mishna in Pesachim that says the children grab the Matza so they shouldn't fall asleep. (Chasam Sofer) Dogs watch the house from burglars. On the night of Pesach the dogs did not bark therefore they were vulnerable to thieves. As a Zecher to this we steal the Afikoman. ...


6

It is illegal in many areas even if the case law on it is not well established. See: http://compnetworking.about.com/od/wirelessfaqs/f/legal_free_wifi.htm for some discussion on cases in various states. (There's even a case of someone having been arrested.) You may want to brush up on the local laws to see if you have an issue of Dina D'malchuta ...


6

On a more basic level, perhaps, it's just this: People looking at these camels wouldn't know that they instinctively don't eat stuff that's not theirs - they would think that, like any animals, they'll freely graze anywhere if given the chance. So Avraham had them muzzled in order to demonstrate to all the necessity of respecting other people's property.


6

See http://www.businesshalacha.com/webfm_send/860 and http://www.daat.ac.il/daat/english/halacha/schneider_1.htm. There are several reasons why copying tapes could be prohibited. Many poskim hold that "Intellectual property" is like real property. One who steals "intellectual property" is like real stealing. When one sells a tape, one could make a ...


6

Even so, the definition of chamas, as opposed to gezel, according to Rabbi Chanina in Bereishit Rabba is less than a shava peruta. (So too Rav Acha in Yerushalmi Bava Metzia.) Since the pasuk mentioned chamas, rather than gezel, it is a midrashic approach to look at the halachic definition of a chamsan. The courts back then, presumably, did not work ...


5

Even if he was sure the camels wouldn't eat from others' fields, Eliezer couldn't rely on a miracle. (Etz Yosef)


5

I'm not sure if this is an answer or a comment, since I don't actually know R' Yitzchok of Vorki's source. In a story published in Parshat Yitro of Shlomo Yosef Zevin's book, translated by Artscroll as "A Treasury of Chassidic Tales", a story that addresses this is brought. In short, R' Yitzchok of Vorki (before he became Rebbe) once said that "when one is ...


5

The Chochmas Adam dismisses this question and says that we play Dreidel not to earn money but rather to be Mikayem a Minhag Yisroel and therefore the whole question is not relevant.


5

The Chasam Sofer is infuriated that people are gambling on Chanukah. He says if it was up to him, he'd say "if you'll pick one night to gamble anyhow, do it on December 25th when you're not learning Torah anyhow", but that would mean he'd be telling people to gamble on a night when they might not otherwise be (years such as this when chanukah falls out well ...


5

It may depend on the condition of the bills when he stole them and when he's repaying the theft. Shulchan Aruch, Choshen Mishpat 360:7 (from Bava Kamma 96b) states: הגוזל מעות ישנות ושיפן וחידשן לא קנה שהרי מתיישנין וחוזרים כשהיו. גזל מעות חדשים וישנן קנה שאם יחדשם פנים חדשות הם If one steals old coins, and polishes them to make them appear new, he ...


5

I think you're confused. If someone stole and then confessed, they just pay it back. If one FALSELY SWORE after stealing something, then felt guilty, then in addition to a guilt sacrifice, one must pay it back plus "a fifth" (actually a quarter, but that's a story for another day). See Leviticus 5:20. Gezel HaGer (Numbers 5:5) is simply a special case of ...


5

Short answer: no, it's not a formal prohibition, but it's still wrong to prevent someone from sleeping. From http://www.dinonline.org/2013/11/05/gezel-sheina-stealing-sleep/ The sefer “Ve-Ahavta Le-Re’acha Kamocha” notes that Rav Chaim of Brisk used the expression “gezel sheina,” implying that waking somebody up needlessly is a form of theft. ...


5

Shulchan Aruch (Orach Chaim 658:5) rules explicitly that only if the last person returns the esrog is the first one (and all others) yotzei. Interesting sidebar: The Biur Halacha is in doubt whether they were yotzei only if the last user returned the esrog on his own volition to the original owner or even if the original owner had to demand it back from the ...



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