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The Rambam rules that B'nai No'ach (and, how much more so, those in the coversion process) can accept upon themselves any of the mitzvos. The Radvaz suggests that he not take on those mitzvos that require kedusha or tahara such as Tefillin, Sefer Torah or Mezuzah. Tzitzis do not have kedusha. Here is an interesting thought (at least I think it is:) The ...


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Yes, you can wear a Tallis/Tzitzis since the Tallis itself has no holyness, it is just an instrument of a Mitzva (תשמישי מצווה) furthermore, the fear for companionship with a Jew (שמא יתלווה לישראל בדרך) is also not relevant since we are talking about a proselyte who intends to join Kehal Hashem. See further info in details in Mishnat Hager (Ch. 1, 32). ...


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Tefillin as I understand is a mitzvah which teathers your body to the 'light'. That is, you literally put them on your arm, which represents the heart, and on your head, which represents the eyes. In doing so, and saying the customary blessings and prayers with them enough, you gradually fill up your eyes and heart, or your organs, with what they call ...


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The issue here is essentially one of lowest common denominator. A conversion will only be accepted by Group X if they think that Group Y, who oversaw the conversion, did so appropriately and successfully, following all the relevant laws as understood by Group X. Otherwise, Group X will continue to view the potential convert as a gentile with all that ...


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Chananya ben Azur was a prophet (until he went bad), and he was a Givoni, who are a nation of converts (Rashi on Yirmiyah 28:6).


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See here from Gershon Gold: The Rambam in Hilchos Avel 2:3 says that a Ger is not obligated to mourn for either of his parents. This is so because someone who is a Ger is considered as if he is reborn, and therefore has no Halachic relationship to his parents (Yevamos 22a; Bava Kamma 88a). The Beis Yosef (Yoreh De'ah 374) quotes the Mordechai in the name ...


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We see from the dvar Torah from Rabbi Moshe Kormornick (www.shortvort.com) quoted above that the Jews definitely did not have any intention of returning to Egypt to convert the Egyptians! We can also add a proof to this based on Hashem's words to Moshe: "You will not see Pharoah every again (alive)" We also have a debate in the Gemora whether Pharaoh was ...


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Thank you for coming to J.SE. It sounds like you're going through a difficult time, may God help you through it with tranquility. Giyur lechumra applies in cases where there's a good chance a conversion wasn't really needed, e.g. some rabbis feel this way about the population of Ethiopian Jews. From the strict technical standpoint of Orthodox halacha, it ...


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Rabbi David Katz book The World of The Ger is an amazing resource for learning about Ger Toshav, it has help me in my search as a non-Jew on my path to honor Hashem..


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If the non-Jew swore off idolatry then he is not stam "goy"(see Hilchot Maachalot Assurot 11:8). It is forbidden for a stam "goy" to keep shabbat(see Hilchot Melachim 10:9) and some opinions even for the stam goy to rest on Shabbat. However, if he has given up idolatry then he is no longer a stam goy and then Hilchot Melachim 10:10 applies, in that he is a ...


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Conservative Judaism is a movement that began in the 19th-20th centuries as an offshoot of the Reform movement that sought to overturn traditional Jewish practice and belief. It rejects what are generally considered to be the fundamental tenets of traditional (i.e. "Orthodox") Judaism (e.g. the 13 principles of faith of Maimonides). Therefore, the consensus ...


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Let me start by quoting Maimonides (Ty @Yishai) who is discussing an inadvertent transgression of a gentile of one of the Seven Noahide laws, which are punishable by human court. http://m.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/1188355/jewish/Melachim-uMilchamot-Chapter-10.htm "A gentile who inadvertently violates one of his commandments is exempt from all ...


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Rav Hirsch on 24:10 states that one reason for the doubt is that he was born before the revelation. This would make it a case in which a woman converts after she has given birth so that the child is not Jewish. there is still a doubt whether this rule applies to cases where the child was born before the mother had received the Torah on Sinai ...


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Ramban says that by "he converted", it means he chose to live according to a Jewish lifestyle. The rest of the nations followed the patrilineal system, according to which he would have been Egyptian. Choosing to be Jewish was his "conversion", in a way. ומה שאמר בת"כ (פרשה יד א): בתוך בני ישראל, מלמד שנתגייר, אינו שיצטרך בגירות, אלא ככל ישראל שנכנסו ...



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