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The opinion expressed by Chuck Davidson is based on a straight reading of the Shulchan Aruch (YD 268:2 & 12), which states that if a properly functioning beis din performs a conversion, the conversion is final and valid even if the convert subsequently fails to keep Torah law. On the other hand, according to most poskim, a beis din is not empowered to ...


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This question was tweeted by @StackJudaism. I thought it was an interesting question, so I showed it to a friend of mine, as I'll often do with interesting tweets from both that account, as well as @mi_yodeya (which is run by people.) He answered, on the spot, that it wouldn't be a problem. He referred me to Ram"a to Shulchan Aruch, Yoreh De'ah 114, who ...


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This answer is based off of experience of being present at a giyur l'chumra conducted by R' Yosef Berger. The Beis Din does not remind the convert, as is normally done, that this is his last chance to change his mind and not become a Jew, as we are already assuming that he is a Jew, and the conversion is "just in case." In the conversion which I witnessed, ...


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In Hilchot Issurei Biah 13:17, the Rambam states that: גר שלא בדקו אחריו או שלא הודיעוהו המצות ועונשן ומל וטבל בפני ג' הדיוטות ה"ז גר אפילו נודע שבשביל דבר הוא מתגייר הואיל ומל וטבל יצא מכלל העכו"ם וחוששין לו עד שיתבאר צדקותו ואפילו חזר ועבד כו"ם הרי הוא כישראל מומר שקידושיו קידושין ומצוה להחזיר אבידתו מאחר שטבל נעשה כישראל ולפיכך קיימו שמשון ושלמה ...


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In a giyur lechumra you are considered Jewish to yourself but not to others. So you have to keep everything, but other people regard you as a non-Jew, whereas when you are non-Jew before a conversion, you are indeed a non-Jew and don't have to keep anything like a Jew.


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See http://judaism.stackexchange.com/a/48512/21 for more. If we have some magical machine that can tell us that a person is completely sincere about their conversion, then it can't be revoked by their behavior afterwards. But if we have reason to suspect an insincere conversion, then their behavior immediately afterwards could be used as an indication. ...


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Rabbi Sorotzkin, in Oznayim Latorah, says that based on the response of Shechem (the prince), they were "geirei arayos" (עריות) which is worse than "Geirei Ari" (ארי) used for the Shomronim who converted because of a fear of lions. This means they "converted" to be able to get the "Jewish women" which is invalid. Both the Bnai Yisrael and the people of ...


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The Torah Lodaas sheet published weekly by Rabbi Matis Blum, in its Vayishlach 2014 issue, quotes the G'riz as follows (in my own translation): In truth, the response of Yaakov's sons was not merely to fool [the Shechemites] into circumcising themselves so they'd be able to kill them. Rather, it was a truthful response to Chamor's words: he had told them ...


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I believe there is no standard form of celebration. However, at Orthodox shuls it is normal to sponsor a kiddush on Shabbos morning, for all kinds of celebrations or remembrances. I've seen converts celebrate by sponsoring a kiddush (as is typically done when a baby girl is born). If the convert is a man, he will most likely receive an aliyah for the first ...


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Since a ger would not have received a portion of land with the Bnei Yisrael (entering after the 40 years in the desert), then he would not have been able to harvest his own crop. As a result, he would be among the needy who would not have a harvest to use to provide food. Therefore, the Bnai Yisrael are warned that they should make sure that he has enough to ...


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I would argue that the גֵּר is mentioned in Leviticus 19 and 23 above along with the עָנִי above because it was not uncommon for a convert to also be needy. The Talmud warns 36 times in Bava Metzia 59b against wronging a convert. So the warnings against treating a convert differently go back to the time of Moses. It is not difficult to imagine that if ...


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Public acknowledgement of conversion must walk a balance; on the one hand we are not supposed to call out converts (we do not remind him of his former status), but on the other hand, a transition has occurred that affects this person's participation in the community. In the congregations I'm familiar with, the convert receives an aliyah at first reasonable ...



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