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7

I'm a layperson (not a rabbi) who's spoken with and helped teach Reform conversion candidates. This answer is based on that experience; see also the CCAR's guidelines for conversion. The beit din will, nearly universally, require successful completion of an introduction-to-Judaism class early in the process (~3 hours/week for 6 months or so). This class ...


0

If the grandmother is considered a convert than she shouldn't have married a kohen and her sons are chalalim. If she wasn't a convert than her sons are not Jewish. In either case the sons children are Jewish (as their mothers are Jewish) but the daughters should not marry kohanim (either because they are chalalot or because their father is not Jewish). Their ...


1

The mishnah in Sanhedrin (top of 46b) states that even the family of someone killed by Beis Din, for whom shiva is FORBIDDEN, may engage in anninus, since that is entirely internal. Halacha specifically recognizes internal emotion as a separate sphere or mourning and chooses not to regulate it in this case. It would seem that anninus would be entirely ...


6

The Talmud states in several places (Yevamos 46b, Kiddushin 62b), based on Biblical exegesis, that 3 people are required to witness something in order for the conversion to be valid: גר צריך שלשה מ"ט (ויקרא כד, כב) משפט כתיב ביה כדין Conversion needs 3. Why? It says "judgement" by conversion, like a court case (which needs a Court of 3 judges). ...


-5

There is another question currently being discussed that touches on similar points. First off, any conversion is done under the assumption of Rabbinic approval (i.e.: that the authority of the conversion rests upon the approval of the rabbis). This is similar to how all marriages are done "Kidas Moshe ViYisroel" with Rabbinic approval, which allows Beis Din ...


2

From the intro to chapter 5 in זרע ישראל by Rav Amsalem, he describes Zera Yisrael as: ויש להם לרוב צד יהדות ברור, שאביהם או סבם או סבתם וכדומה היו יהודים שנשאו נכריות So he does include a Jewish grandparent in his definition. In almost every example after that, the book seems to uses the case of a Jewish father, but it seems that Rav Amsalem views ...


-1

As I understand it, Zera Yisrael(Seed of Israel) IS a halachic concept, applicable to non-jews who are patrilineal descendants of Jews. That is, some forefather along their direct paternal lineage was halachically Jewish, whether it was one generation ago or a descendant of the Bnei Anusim of the inquisition period or anything in between. This can mean they ...



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