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12

Tosefos addresses a similar line of thought in Bava Kamma 85a: שנתנה רשות לרפאות - א"ת והא מרפא לחודיה שמעינן ליה וי"ל דה"א ה"מ מכה בידי אדם אבל חולי הבא בידי שמים כשמרפא נראה כסותר גזירת המלך קמ"ל דשרי (Rough translation) - One may have thought that there is no right to seek healing from a sickness that comes from Heaven, as it seems like ...


9

The fact that conversion exists as part of halachah means that it is within the framework of options that G-d is giving you. If you felt that really you were supposed to be a woman, then the correct response is to say "If G-d had wanted me to be a woman he would have made me one," because sex change operations etc. are not halachik options. We can't know ...


7

In terms of rabbis being willing to work with you, I don't think that would be a factor. I've talked with a lot of converts and conversion candidates, including one named Christina, and none of them reported any inquiry or hesitation based on factors beyond their control like what their parents named them. You will probably get some odd looks from other ...


7

There are these statements, from Kehillas Yaakov, s.v. גרים: גרים הן מזיווג הנשמות בג״ע זוהר שלח...וגס מזיווג הצדיקים בחייהן אותו זיווג שאינו מוליד ממנו וולד אעפ״כ אינו לבטלה שנברא ממנו נשמת גרים "Gerim come from the union of souls in Gan Eden (Zohar, Shelach)...and also from the marital unions of tzaddikim during their lifetimes: their unions that ...


6

If a woman converted before she conceived any children are they considered Jewish? Even with a non-Jewish father? Yes. Children of a Jewish mother are Jewish, regardless. If mom converted she's Jewish. (A child who was in the mother's womb when mom converted is also Jewish, by the way.)


6

To paraphrase myself, If a person converts by any standard that is not universally recognized, then that person will not be regarded as Jewish by those with stricter standards. As you've observed, Orthodox Judaism is stricter than Conservative Judaism, and Orthodox conversion requires more than Conservative or Reform conversion. As such, Conservative ...


6

There is no chain of descent. This is similar to the questions about relatives who convert and the various laws of inheritence. A man who has a child by a non-Jewish woman is not considered to have fulfilled the mitzvah of Pru U'Rvu and the child has no connection with him. This is analogous in the case of the person who blasphemed in the desert. The ...


5

Converts are a way that Gd rewards us for doing His Will. He selects a righteous individual from the nations and attaches them to Israel, like a King who rewards his well-behaved son by planting a beautiful plant in his garden, (Yerush. Berahot 2:8). We'd be sorely lacking without these beautiful plants: Odabia, was an Edomite convert, praised even more ...


5

As discussed previously: 1800 years ago, it sounds like the Mishnah would permit a mamzer to marry a non-Jewish (actually, more like quasi-Jewish) slave woman; when that woman is freed she (and her unborn children) become full Jews. A (male) mamzer would thus be allowed to father a non-mamzer child this way. In contemporary times you can't just go out and ...


4

There's a Rabbi Frand tape concerning such a question. The fellow was given a Jewish circumcision on day 8 (or maybe the Sunday thereafter), then grew up, attended yeshiva for many years, then suddenly realized he was not halachically Jewish -- he thus sought to convert now. The ruling given was that he'd had a circumcision done "for the sake of Judaism" ...


4

A giyur lechumra is usually intended for someone who's already fully observing Judaism. The execution is the same -- circumcision or drawing blood for men; declaration of mitzva acceptance and immersion in a mikva witnessed by three rabbis. If someone's already keeping everything but for instance oops, found out they were adopted, then the rabbis assume the ...


4

Let's start with the captive. This only applies when the Kingdom of Israel is going to war. That has to be declared at the national level and has a particular legal status. As an individual I can't do "war", only "self-defense." What's more, Rambam Laws of Kings and Their Wars Ch. 8 spells out that the Jewish soldier is allowed to be with the captive one ...


4

From various Mishnayot (see below) we see that a Ger's possessions seem to continue to belong to him after he converts. In that case, the moment your buyer converts, he owns Chametz on Pessach - Chametz from which everybody is now forbidden to derive benefit from - similar to any Chametz a Jew owns on Pessach. Result: He would not be allowed to sell it ...


3

Shaalos U'Tshuvos Achiezer 3:26 says that if one accepts all the Mitzvos yet intends to break one of them intentionally, it is not a lack of accepting the Mitzvos. . אבל במי שמקבל עליו כל המצוות, רק שבדעתו לעבור לתיאבון, אין זה חיסרון בדין קבלת המצוות Igros Moshe Yoreh Deah 3:108 also says that if one converts knowing they will be unable to keep one ...


3

Monica beat me to it by a few seconds here, but I'll finish what I started writing. I'm assuming the housemate is not a "boyfriend/girlfriend" type person. Just someone who happens to live in the same house. Otherwise, that's a horse of a completely different color! (You may want to rephrase the top question line, as sadly I think many people today would ...


3

This is something to discuss with your rabbi, but I'm not aware of any halacha that would forbid this and I've never heard a convert (I know several and we've talked about the process) mention this issue. That's weak evidence, but consider: your rabbi (and ultimately the beit din you stand before) is concerned that you will be able to transition into and ...


3

A similar question applies to food cooked by a non-Jew who is converting to Judaism--can the convert eat the food or is it prohibited as bishul nokhri? R. Herschel Schachter apparently holds that the convert may eat the food he previously cooked as a non-Jew, for the following reason: There is a question whether the prohibition is based on fear of ...


2

This is true on the de'oraisa level, i.e., on the level of Torah law. But mi-derabbanan, they are not allowed to marry each other so that it does not look like "they came from a place of greater holiness to a place of lesser holiness." In other words, since they were not allowed to marry when they were non-Jews, they can't marry as Jews either. Source: ...


2

This is a subject of contemporary debate. 30 years ago, the vast majority of American rabbis ruled that the Jewish status of a child is determined entirely by the status of the birth mother. The late Rabbi Aaron Soloveichik of Chicago went so far as to write "the egg is treated as nothing more than some synthetic device made in Japan." In Israel, many ...


2

It was my understanding that Gentiles were allowed to bring certain sacrifices--kosher of course--to the Holy Temple. Since prayer is, at least in part, a substitution for the korbans, why would a non-Jew not be allowed to pray in a synagogue. Of course there are many practical reasons why they should not be allowed into a synagogue for prayer but the ...


2

I think it's possible that the final part is about someone who was born Jewish. That reading is supported by the way the Mishna elsewhere speaks about the child of a Jewish mother being Jewish, and I don't think that disputes about this are recorded. The quote you gave is about converts... but the second half is also about which groups of people say what in ...


2

Sincere intent to accept the Written and Oral Torah. (Some would add: to the best of their understanding.) For men: circumcision, or drawing blood if already circumcised. Immersion in a mikvah before a panel of three Jews who are eligible to render halachic testimony. (And add an animal sacrifice, back when those were doable.)


2

No, you would not have an issue because of your name. You may (depending on who you spoke with) get some desire to change the name, as some question the use of the word (although as far as I know it is better than substituting it with an X and writing X-tian as is common). But upon conversion the practice* is to take a new Jewish name, so for all matters ...


2

http://www.shtaygen.co.il/?CategoryID=817&ArticleID=7936 InParshas Lech Lecha - Braishis 15:15 it says that when Avraham will pass away ואתה תבוא אל אבותיך בשלום. Rashi explains that even though Terach was an idol worshipper it says come to your parent, since Terach repented prior to his death. The Marhasha was asked the following question when he was ...


2

A child born to a Jewish mother is Jewish,1 and one born to a non-Jewish mother is not. This is determined at the time of birth, which is why infant conversions are sometimes done when a woman is in the process of conversion. Changes in the mother's status after the child is born are not relevant. One source for this is Kiddushin 66b (in the mishna at the ...


1

The Gemara in Pesachim 87b writes: R. Elazar said: The Holy One, Blessed be He, did not exile Israel among the nations save in order that converts might join them. From this gemara it is clear that God desires that there should be converts.


1

...if G-d had wanted me to have a Jewish soul, wouldn't he have had me born into a Jewish family? It's possible that you are being tested to see if you will go all the way and convert. We see that Abraham was tested; had G-d wanted him to live in the land of Canaan, why wasn't he born there? (That said, we firmly believe that there's no obligation for ...


1

There is a general consensus among the poskim that one cannot convert without having a milah. See here who refers to the views of: שו״ת ארץ טובה סי׳ ב׳, ומשברי ים סי׳ ט״ו, זכר זכר יצחק סי׳ ג׳, מלמד להועיל סי׳ פ״ו, דעת כהן סי׳ ק״נ, ועיין בשרידי אש ח״ב סי׳ ק״ב־ק״ג שכתב שלתשובתו הסכימו כל גדולי הדור,ובכללם מרן הגאון רח״ע גדודזנסקי זצ״ל. This is also the ...


1

Like everything else, it's debated! There are opinions that he simply can't convert, that he needs no circumcision, or that he is allowed to "roll the dice" and choose to risk circumcision (let's assume a hemophiliac) for the sake of becoming Jewish. (If I'm not mistaken, it's mentioned in this shiur.) The best bet would be to see what drugs and techniques ...


1

Someone wishing to convert will work with a rabbi, who will guide the convert through the process and ensure that the following requirements are met before proceeding to the beit din (court). A convert, first and foremost, must accept the yoke of the mitzvot (kabbalat ol mitzvot). In other words, a convert must be doing it out of a sincere desire to join ...



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