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12

God expects Jews to follow the torah and gentiles to follow the Noachide laws. Until you've converted you're still a gentile and don't have additional heavenly obligations. Perhaps you have heard of people in the process of conversion being required to do more. If so, it's likely a misunderstanding. Once you are studying with a rabbi he will guide you to ...


11

Does Vayikro (Leviticus) 19:34 suit? כְּאֶזְרָח מִכֶּם יִהְיֶה לָכֶם הַגֵּר | הַגָּר אִתְּכֶם וְאָהַבְתָּ לוֹ כָּמוֹךָ כִּי גֵרִים הֱיִיתֶם בְּאֶרֶץ מִצְרָיִם אֲנִי יְקוָֹק אֱלֹקיכֶם The stranger who sojourns with you shall be as a native from among you, and you shall love him as yourself; for you were strangers in the land of Egypt. I am ...


9

Normally the circumcision preformed by a physician is sufficient to meet the physical requirements of "milah" (circumcision), nevertheless a process known as "hatafas dam bris" (הטפת דם ברית) is necessary (Shulchan Aruch, Yoreh Deah 268:1). In this process the Mohel draws a ritual drop of blood from the place of circumcision for the sake of the covenant. It ...


8

Depends what you mean by "true". For millennia, Judaism believed roughly in the same things as what we now call Orthodox Judaism, and abided by roughly the same rules. So in that sense, yes, Orthodox Judaism is the only true way to convert: other conversions are not to Judaism. However, if you want to convert to them, then by all means do so. There's ...


8

There are actually several places in the Pentateuch where this idea is mentioned, e.g.: Exodus 12:49 תּוֹרָה אַחַת יִהְיֶה לָאֶזְרָח וְלַגֵּר הַגָּר בְּתוֹכְכֶם - One law shall be to him that is native, and unto the sojourner that sojourneth among you. Leviticus 19:34 כְּאֶזְרָח מִכֶּם יִהְיֶה לָכֶם הַגֵּר הַגָּר אִתְּכֶם וְאָהַבְתָּ לוֹ ...


8

It depends. If you mean that until now you have been completely shaving them like a crew cut, then letting them grow a bit should be fine, no one would really notice a major change. (Click here for a full explanation on Peyos) If you mean to grow them out long until they curl around your ears or even longer, well i will tell you what my rebbe told me - "It'...


8

It is a Biblical injunction that there must be 3 people involved at some point in conversion as in a monetary court decision - see the top of Kiddushin 62b, for example: גר צריך שלשה מאי טעמא משפט כתיב ביה כדין. Where in the process the 3 are necessary is more debatable. Tosefos to Kiddushin 62b writes that the 3 are necessary for acceptance of mitzvos, but ...


7

John Hyrcanus of the Hasmonean Dynasty of Jewish leaders (that's Maccabees) forced the Idumeans (that's Edom) to convert when he took over their land. John Hycarnus was the third son of Simon, and reigned Judea as Ethnarch and High Priest from 135 to 104 BCE. The forced conversions under John Hyrcanus gave us Herod the great, the one who beautified and ...


6

We can't possibly know how God judges people after they die. We know that he is compassionate, and I think it's safe to assume that he isn't going out of his way to punish people for things they didn't really understand. On the other hand, perhaps a person who believes himself to be Jewish but still violates halacha does receive punishment even though he was ...


6

Yes, the child would need to redeem himself when he grows up. (Mishna Bechorot 8:1, ShA YD 305:20)


5

Maimonides states in the Laws of Forbidden Sexual Relations 13:4, that a non-Jew immerses in a mikveh by himself, it has no effect. The Shulchan Aruch in Y"D 268:3 holds this way as well, provided one did not previously accept the commandments on oneself in front of three Jews. (See Be'er Heitiv that '2' in the S"A may refer to the requirement to at least ...


5

Geirut is just one of many matters that must be adjudicated by a beit din. The minimum size of a beit din is three per halacha. (Sometimes it's larger, as elaborated in the mishna in Sanhedrin.) So without a beit din you have only an intention to convert, but not a recognized conversion. For more on the requirement of a beit din for conversion, see ...


5

Rabbi Yisroel Reisman writes in The Laws of Ribbis: If a Jews lends money to a non-Jew, and the non-Jewish borrower then converts to Judaism, the lender may not collect interest which accrues after the Geirus [=conversion to Judaism]. However, interest which accrued before the Geirus must be paid. In this case, there is no difference if the bill (or ...


5

At first glance the daughter is either herself a convert, or the product of a kohen's prohibited marriage to a convert, i.e. a chalala. Either way she'd be prohibited from marrying a Kohen.


4

Caveat, this answer is mostly what I've gathered from the communities I live in as well as discussion with my rabbi. This all depends on the community you're converting into and the customs of your rabbi. If you choose to adopt Ashkenazi customs, you should wear tzitzit which are tied according to the Ashkenazi practice. The same formula goes for if you ...


4

Abraham and Sarah were converting people to ethical monotheism, not Judaism. So the answer is "Jewish religious leadership has never advocated knocking on doors to convert people to Judaism." As Aaron discussed, the Hasmonean kings tried pushing conversion, but that was a political move that the rabbis denounced.


4

No, at present male Gerim and their male children do not have an inheritance in the land of Israel. Inheritance of property comes through the male line, meaning father to son. Male converts do not become a part of any of the twelve tribes. And thus, their male children do not have a portion in the land at this time. This was a case decided by the court of ...


3

In short, one of the requirements for a male convert is to enter the covenant of Abraham as the Jews did in the desert (after leaving Egypt) from where we learn the requirements of conversion To enter the covenant of Abraham an action needs to be made (specifically if you were not born jewish) in perfect circumstances the foreskin needs to be removed (...


3

You're correct. From a technical standpoint of Jewish law, at the time of conception the father was not Jewish and therefore no blood relation is recognized vis-a-vis the father. There are practical reasons why it would be better for the father to be Jewish, for instance all the ingredients in the kitchen could be kosher, but in some cases the food isn't ...


3

According to Rabbi Moshe Isserles (the REMA) in the Mechir Yayin al Megillat Esther, they would be proper converts because: Fear of the Jews had fallen upon them (8:17) Or, "that which the Jews feared fell upon them "--the awe of Heaven experienced by the Jews was of such intensity that it infused even their countrymen, inspiring them to convert. ...


3

There are no benefits to converting beyond the fact that you are serving as an example and teacher to the rest of the nations, and that your fate is tied to that of the Jewish people, who if are collectively righteous, are promised the opportunity for maximum spiritual growth. However, an extremely high degree of spiritual growth is available to gentiles who ...


2

A perspective convert is not obligated to keep any extra mitzvos for it. Today it is common for a beis din to independently decide as a matter of policy to require the show of commitment of a candidate practicing while readying him/herself for the actual conversion. After all, the person could try the lifestyle and find it leaves them cold, avoiding a ...


2

i'm only going to post this answer because i didn't see anyone else cover these topics. Many people think that before Abraham, no one worshipped God. But this isn't true, because we have Melkhitzedek who was a priest of God. If there is a priest of God, then more than likely there is some sort of formalized religion, or at the very least, a tradition passed ...


2

It seems according to the Radvaz 1:73 that a man who wants to marry a Jewish woman who was previously a karaite and now accepts all the derabbanans is allowed. He held that their(karaites) kiddushin is not a kiddushin at all and the problem of mamzerut does not apply. He ends off saying that in Egypt they had a mass conversion of Karaites and they were ...


2

I asked this question to one of the rebeim in my grade school and he answered that the passuk was going down the list based on how common the subject was. Children are most commonly found, servants less so, animals even less, and finally geirim which were the least common.


2

2-3 years is actually quite a short time to expect to have heard of all Halachos. You probably haven't heard a Shiur in Halacha of living a Jew either. not have you heard a Halachic Shiur on jealousy, being haughty, or anger. These aren't in the Shulchan Aruch, although it was filled in by the Magen Avraham and Mishna Berura. They don't have set ins and ...


2

The definition of a Jew according to halacha (Jewish law) is Someone whose mother is Jewish (according to this definition) or Someone who has converted according to halacha. This is the first recursive algorithm known. The start point was the revelation at Sinai when all those who received the Torah converted at once. Only the Orthodox conversion ...


2

May HaShem bless you as you seek to come under the wings of His shekhinah! In answer to your question(s): According to halakhah, if one is not wearing tekheleth in his ssissiyyoth then all that is required is the correct amount of kasher strings and at least three windings (and there is a LOT of leeway in the halakhah for doing more windings, knots, etc.). ...


2

Rabbi Chaim Kanievsky is known for saying (as brought in ויקרא שמו בישראל) that certain "modern" names, such as Shira, are "not real names" and people with such names should have their names changed. Don't ask me how he deals with his own name (which also doesn't appear anywhere in the Torah as a name)! By no means is his 'Psak' universal, however ...


2

Here's an interesting article on this subject. In short, the term ger tzedek is only used in a small fraction of the gemara when speaking about converts. In most cases, even when "full converts" are spoken of, the simple title ger is used. The term ger tzedek was introduced in order to emphasize the differences between a full convert, and a ger toshav who ...



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