Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

The vast majority of shuls self-identified as Orthodox are mainstream. So chances are, any Orthodox shul or community you approach will be mainstream. Sabbateans are non-existent, as far as I know. Karaites are very rare and will not pretend to be Orthodox. Any Orthodox shul without a mechitza (I hear there are a few left) is outside of the mainstream, ...


11

According to traditional Judaism, you are Jewish if and only if you yourself have converted to Judaism OR your mother was Jewish (ShA EH 7:17 and 8:5). To determine if your mother was Jewish apply the same rules: either she herself converted to Judaism OR her mother was Jewish. This process recurs indefinitely. NOTE that in order to prove any of these claims ...


11

Does Vayikro (Leviticus) 19:34 suit? כְּאֶזְרָח מִכֶּם יִהְיֶה לָכֶם הַגֵּר | הַגָּר אִתְּכֶם וְאָהַבְתָּ לוֹ כָּמוֹךָ כִּי גֵרִים הֱיִיתֶם בְּאֶרֶץ מִצְרָיִם אֲנִי יְקוָֹק אֱלֹקיכֶם The stranger who sojourns with you shall be as a native from among you, and you shall love him as yourself; for you were strangers in the land of Egypt. I am ...


10

1 - Conservative and Mamzerut are two separate issues. If the boy is Jewish (his mother is Jewish) then he does not need to convert. He would be considered a Baal Teshuva, one who has repented. He does not require any specific training, although if he is serious about his orthodoxy should learn the Mitzvos in order to lead a proper orthodox life. 2 - If the ...


10

God expects Jews to follow the torah and gentiles to follow the Noachide laws. Until you've converted you're still a gentile and don't have additional heavenly obligations. Perhaps you have heard of people in the process of conversion being required to do more. If so, it's likely a misunderstanding. Once you are studying with a rabbi he will guide you to ...


9

See http://judaism.stackexchange.com/a/48512/21 for more. If we have some magical machine that can tell us that a person is completely sincere about their conversion, then it can't be revoked by their behavior afterwards. But if we have reason to suspect an insincere conversion, then their behavior immediately afterwards could be used as an indication. ...


9

Shulchan Arukh, Yoreh Deah 268:12 ‏...ואפילו חזר ועבד עבודת כוכבים – הרי הוא כישראל מומר שקידושיו קידושין.‏ ישראל מומר שעשה תשובה – אינו צריך לטבול. רק מדרבנן יש לו לטבול ולקבל עליו דברי חבירות בפני שלושה ...even if the convert returned to worshiping idols -- he is still a Jew such that his marriage proposals are binding. An apostate Jew ...


9

Normally the circumcision preformed by a physician is sufficient to meet the physical requirements of "milah" (circumcision), nevertheless a process known as "hatafas dam bris" (הטפת דם ברית) is necessary (Shulchan Aruch, Yoreh Deah 268:1). In this process the Mohel draws a ritual drop of blood from the place of circumcision for the sake of the covenant. It ...


8

There are actually several places in the Pentateuch where this idea is mentioned, e.g.: Exodus 12:49 תּוֹרָה אַחַת יִהְיֶה לָאֶזְרָח וְלַגֵּר הַגָּר בְּתוֹכְכֶם - One law shall be to him that is native, and unto the sojourner that sojourneth among you. Leviticus 19:34 כְּאֶזְרָח מִכֶּם יִהְיֶה לָכֶם הַגֵּר הַגָּר אִתְּכֶם וְאָהַבְתָּ לוֹ ...


7

This answer is based off of experience of being present at a giyur l'chumra conducted by R' Yosef Berger. The Beis Din does not remind the convert, as is normally done, that this is his last chance to change his mind and not become a Jew, as we are already assuming that he is a Jew, and the conversion is "just in case." In the conversion which I witnessed, ...


7

I'm a layperson (not a rabbi) who's spoken with and helped teach Reform conversion candidates. This answer is based on that experience; see also the CCAR's guidelines for conversion. The beit din will, nearly universally, require successful completion of an introduction-to-Judaism class early in the process (~3 hours/week for 6 months or so). This class ...


7

Ramban says that by "he converted", it means he chose to live according to a Jewish lifestyle. The rest of the nations followed the patrilineal system, according to which he would have been Egyptian. Choosing to be Jewish was his "conversion", in a way. ומה שאמר בת"כ (פרשה יד א): בתוך בני ישראל, מלמד שנתגייר, אינו שיצטרך בגירות, אלא ככל ישראל שנכנסו ...


7

Rav Hirsch on 24:10 states that one reason for the doubt is that he was born before the revelation. This would make it a case in which a woman converts after she has given birth so that the child is not Jewish. there is still a doubt whether this rule applies to cases where the child was born before the mother had received the Torah on Sinai ...


6

According to this article by Rabbi Dr. Ari Zivotofsky there is no requirement to remove a tattoo, although it could be considered a pious act to do so, especially if the tattoo depicts something immoral and idolatrous. He discusses four ways of removing a tattoo, two of which are permissible, and two of which are questionable. Removal via a cream or laser ...


6

The Torah Lodaas sheet published weekly by Rabbi Matis Blum, in its Vayishlach 2014 issue, quotes the G'riz as follows (in my own translation): In truth, the response of Yaakov's sons was not merely to fool [the Shechemites] into circumcising themselves so they'd be able to kill them. Rather, it was a truthful response to Chamor's words: he had told them ...


6

ArtScroll comments on this situation. Consider the case of two twins, conceived before the conversion but born after the conversion. Thus the case in the mishnah in which one is conceived before the conversion and one afterward is one of maternal but not paternal brothers (as if they were fathered by two different men). This is the same as the case of a ...


6

The Talmud states in several places (Yevamos 46b, Kiddushin 62b), based on Biblical exegesis, that 3 people are required to witness something in order for the conversion to be valid: גר צריך שלשה מ"ט (ויקרא כד, כב) משפט כתיב ביה כדין Conversion needs 3. Why? It says "judgement" by conversion, like a court case (which needs a Court of 3 judges). ...


6

We can't possibly know how God judges people after they die. We know that he is compassionate, and I think it's safe to assume that he isn't going out of his way to punish people for things they didn't really understand. On the other hand, perhaps a person who believes himself to be Jewish but still violates halacha does receive punishment even though he was ...


5

On a similar question about a woman's regular mikvah immersion, Daily Halacha reports several opinions (emphasis mine): Hacham Ovadia Yosef addresses this question in his work Taharat Habayit (vol. 3, p. 26), where he cites a responsum from the work Shebet Halevi (Rabbi Shemuel Wosner, contemporary). The Shebet Halevi distinguishes in this regard between ...


5

While there is a commandment for a Jew to not get a tatoo, Leviticus 19:28, B.T. Makkot 21a there is, however, a separate Torah prohibition - "Lo Yosif" - not to inflict a wound upon yourself, Deuteronomy 25:3. According to many poskim, removing a tattoo involves "wounding" yourself. Therefore, it is generally prohibited to a Jew to inflict pain upon ...


5

In general, only one status is needed to be listed. For a Jewish born virgin, besulah is written because she is due 200 zuz upon divorce/death of husband. For a Jewish born "widow" (I'm not sure why you wrote "woman"), almanah is written because she is due 100 zuz upon termination of the marriage. For a Jewish born divorcee, gerushah is written because even ...


5

Yes, you can wear a Tallis/Tzitzis since the Tallis itself has no holyness, it is just an instrument of a Mitzva (תשמישי מצווה) furthermore, the fear for companionship with a Jew (שמא יתלווה לישראל בדרך) is also not relevant since we are talking about a proselyte who intends to join Kehal Hashem. See further info in details in Mishnat Hager (Ch. 1, 32). ...


5

I think you are being a bit mislead by the translation of "The stranger who resides with you". In Hebrew it is using the verb form of the same word: Ger. The definitive reference to a Ger Toshev is Devarim 14:21: לֹא תֹאכְלוּ כָל נְבֵלָה לַגֵּר אֲשֶׁר בִּשְׁעָרֶיךָ תִּתְּנֶנָּה וַאֲכָלָהּ אוֹ מָכֹר לְנָכְרִי You shall not eat any carcass. You may ...


4

Chananya ben Azur was a prophet (until he went bad), and he was a Givoni, who are a nation of converts (Rashi on Yirmiyah 28:6).


4

I believe there is no standard form of celebration. However, at Orthodox shuls it is normal to sponsor a kiddush on Shabbos morning, for all kinds of celebrations or remembrances. I've seen converts celebrate by sponsoring a kiddush (as is typically done when a baby girl is born). If the convert is a man, he will most likely receive an aliyah for the first ...


4

The issue here is essentially one of lowest common denominator. A conversion will only be accepted by Group X if they think that Group Y, who oversaw the conversion, did so appropriately and successfully, following all the relevant laws as understood by Group X. Otherwise, Group X will continue to view the potential convert as a gentile with all that ...


4

Such a child is regarded after his mother, as elborated in the Gemara (Yevamos pages 16-17, and Kidushin page 68) "Your son (meaning grandson) from a Yisraelit is called your son (meaning that he is called Yisrael or "Jewish" today), and your son from the gentile woman (meaning she who had a child with your son) is not called your son (meaning he is not ...


3

The Sifra (19:11) says that without the inclusion of the "Ger" you would think that the poor would include לעני מאחרים - to the poor from others, a rather cryptic term. The ביאור compiled from the Raavad, Rash, and Korban Aharon on Toras Kohanim here explains that it means a non-Jew is not entitled to collect these gifts, which would not have been excluded ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible