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The Torah, aka the 1st 5 books of "Old Testament" does not use the term "Jew" or in Hebrew, "Yehudi" anywhere. I think this term first appears in the book of Esther. Otherwise, the most common term in the Torah is "B'nei Yisra'el", meaning "Sons (or children) of Israel", with Israel being the name given to Jacob. At any rate, in the Torah, the term "Israel" ...


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The children of Israel will be great sages and spread the light of Torah. The entire world will be occupied with knowing God. The children of Israel should teach the seven laws of the children of Noah to the children of Noah. "And he said, It is a light thing that thou shouldest be my servant to raise up the tribes of Jacob, and to restore the ...


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Rambam rules that although it is completely Biblically prohibited to steal from a gentile (Geneva 1:1), one would only have to pay back the value he stole if he did so (2:1). There is no fine imposed in this case.


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The list is: Keeping Shabbes like we do Keeping Yamim Tovim like we do Torahstudy what does not concern the Sheva Mitzvot Receiving aliyah/laynen Torah in shul putting, writing and wearing tefillin write a Sefer Torah


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A perspective convert is not obligated to keep any extra mitzvos for it. Today it is common for a beis din to independently decide as a matter of policy to require the show of commitment of a candidate practicing while readying him/herself for the actual conversion. After all, the person could try the lifestyle and find it leaves them cold, avoiding a ...


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The Raadbaz was choichech and decided to be stringent in regards to tefillin, mezuzot, and scrolls(Raadbaz on Hilchot Melachim 10:10). This is in regards to bnei Noach and not goyim(Hilchot Melachim 10:10). Rambam states that bnei Noach can do any of the mitzvot as long as they do it properly(Hilchot Melachim 10:10). Goyim, which are idol-worshipping ...


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(I'll respond to the question as it applies to Yom Kippur, as asked. The verse in Numbers is actually talking about a different context, and the same question can be asked there — but wasn't.) According to Maimonides (Yad, T'shuva 1:3–4): T'shuva[1] atones for all sins. Even [if one was] an evildoer all his days and did t'shuva at the end, ...


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Yora daiya 118.1 יין ובשר וחתיכת דג שאין בו סימן שהפקיד או שלח ביד עובד כוכבים צריך שני חותמות אבל יין מבושל ושכר או יין שעירבו בו דברים אחרים כגון דבש וכן החומץ וחלב ומורייס ופת וגבינה וכל שאיסורו מדברי סופרים שהפקידו ביד עובד כוכבים מותר בחותם אחד Says that things that a not kosher substitute of will be forbidden from the torah (ie wine ,meat, or ...


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As @DoubleAA hinted, once a packaged product is open, and esp. if opened in a non-Jew's kitchen, many questions regarding kashrut arise. A bag of sugar can pose a big problem. What utensils went into that bag? Was it a non-kosher utensil? In baking, perhaps, the person had his hands in a non-kosher baked mix and stuck his hand in the sugar bag? Essentially, ...


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See this article regarding the ceremony itself. Near the beginning of the article, it states that non-Jews may attend a brit. As a matter of fact, I invited the CEO of my company, a non-Jew to my 1st son's brit. (It was well-worth the gift that he gave, afterwards, but that wasn't my incentive ;-) As for participating, IIRC, my rav mentioned that there is ...


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There are a few interesting points to address here. I am not going to go into a long discussion on all of the halachot of kashrut here because those can be found in depth around this site and elsewhere. The fact of the matter is, if you are a grunt in the kitchen of a kosher restaurant, the ingredients and utensils provided to you will be kosher and you ...


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There is a dispute at to whether שיתוף (believing in G-d AND another power; the trinity included) is permitted for gentiles. See Is Christianity Avodah Zara? for the differing opinions. There's no need to go through it again. I heard from a Rabbi who's actively involved in spreading knowledge of the 7 Noahide laws that most contemporary rabbis hold that ...


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As many others have mentioned before, when creating laws, you HAVE to make certain distinctions. One of the biggest blindspots i've noticed with Christians trying to understand Judaism, is that they view everything from a theological perspective, and forget one very important point. Modern Christians are used to living in a society where the government is ...


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Koren Tanakhs print both the Christian-derived chapters and the ancient Jewish system of sedarim. It's interesting to see where the sedarim break up differently than the chapters (once a teacher told me that the number is such that if you read one a day, exempting Shabbat, Yom Tov [I think counting one day for Yom Tov as it's an Eretz Yisraeli system] and ...


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I'm going to assume that you are talking about just cooking and not managing a restaurant or other food business. The kosher Chinese restaurant in my neighborhood is supervised by the local Va'ad Harabbanim (Rabbinical board.) Nearly all the chefs are non-Jewish Chinese, though I think one might be Jewish (He does speak Hebrew well but with a Chinese ...


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As mentioned in the comments, the term להבדיל probably comes from its usage in the הבדלה services: המבדיל...בין ישראל לעמים. As far as the suggested supremacist attitude, I don't think Judaism differs in this sense from any other religion; I'd argue that the belief of "we are distinguished from all others" is common to all religions.


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As has been discussed in the comments on the question, I think your understanding of the word "l'havdil" is not quite accurate. "L'havdil" really just means a distinction between things that are comparable in a particular sense, but not in a general sense (because one of the items of comparison is "holier" for some definition of that word). For example, I ...


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As acknowledged in the question, Judaism only requires that non-jews keep the seven Noachide laws (plus some miscellaneous laws which are beyond the scope of this answer). Seeing as the first of these is the prohibition against idolatry, it is clear that belief in any polytheistic religion is definitely a problem. That the prohibition extends to belief in ...


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In short We are special, holy... (G-d choose us, loved us, wanted us, made us holy (with his commandments), and brought us closer for us to do his work, and called his great and holy name on us) Also one of the main commandments we have as Jews is to love each other this makes us focused on each other, and to speak differently about each other and our ...


3

In short if it is forbidden for you, for the gentile to do it for you, it is forbidden even if he volunteered (if he did it for a Jew). A few laws on this subject in the order they were codified Introduction The prohibition for having a gentile do a forbidden work for a Jew on shabos is Rabbinic (this was from shulchan ariuch harav 306.5) and the Rabbi's ...


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No explicit source offhand but, as you yourself suggest, it likely has to do with the fact that the name of the ancestral forefather was really "Ben-Ammi" not just "Ammi" or "Ammon" (to indicate that he was of his mother's father/nation [see e.g. Rashi] , an idea which Moab's mother conveyed with just one word.) As such, (and again as you yourself suggest) ...


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You need to be Jewish, or you need to have a Jewish supervisor, who will make sure that the law is followed and who will light the flames..Kosher laws are very complex, chef must be very proficient with those. For start, it seems you are not aware you will need two separate kitchens. And even if you learn it all, it does not matter, you will still need a ...


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Chazal identify Rome with Edom such as in Eicha Rabbasi (parsha 4): שישי ושמחי בת אדום. זו קיסרין ורומי However, the Parshablog here cites (and translates) Shadal as follows: And know that Edom mentioned in the Torah and other holy books {of Tanach} refers to the nation which dwells between the Reed Sea and the Dead Sea, and it was never the intent ...


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Just by way of background: Kol Isha, or literally the voice of a woman, is a law that falls under the category of Sneas, or modesty. It was designed by the Rabbis to keep men from lusting after women due to man's nature to lust. It is a serious issue for observant men, which is probably why they reacted. It can be very difficult to avoid ...


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You are only obligated to keep the seven mitzvot bnei Noach/seven laws of the children of Noah. If you desire, you may do more, only if you do them properly(Hilchot Melachim 10:10, Raavad on Hilchot Issurei Bi'ah 14:7-8, Avodah Zara 64b, Krisos 9a). You are only obligated to do more mitzvot than the seven if you take upon yourself the whole Torah. There may ...


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God expects Jews to follow the torah and gentiles to follow the Noachide laws. Until you've converted you're still a gentile and don't have additional heavenly obligations. Perhaps you have heard of people in the process of conversion being required to do more. If so, it's likely a misunderstanding. Once you are studying with a rabbi he will guide you to ...


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One is not judged by the 613 commandments unless one is born Jewish or formally converts. A non-Jew could feel they have a Jewish soul, but may eat pork aplenty until converting. (In fact, non-Jews are not supposed to observe the Sabbath, which leads to some discussion about whether someone studying for conversion should somehow break his Sabbath observance ...


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Why do some Jews prefer to live among Christians as opposed to Muslims? This question is difficult to answer. The most likely explanation is that modern Muslim nations are often very hostile towards Jews, whereas most modern majority Christian nations are largely friendly towards Jews. It is also important to note that most majority Christian countries ...


1

Nitei Gavriel Aveilus 51:13 mentions that it is forbidden to hear a Hesped from a priest or someone similar to a priest. In the notes he says it is forbidden as they speak about their religion and wear a cross. This would lead me to believe that a regular non Jew may deliver a eulogy. 5:15 he mentions in the name of the Avodas Hagershuni that a non Jew ...


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I just read "The Golem of Prague" by Gershon Winkler, which is based on "Niflaot Maharal: HaGolem MiPrague" published based on the manuscript of the Maharal's student and son in law, Rav Itzhak ben Shimshon HaCohen Katz. There's a story in there about Jews selling wine to Christian priests ... it leads to them hatching a plot to convert the Jewish girl ...


3

To put it quick: There are 3 issurim which come into play with someone doing Melocha for you: Amira - speaking, or instructing to do melocha; Benefeting - deriving from melocha which was done for you; Shliach - that is having melocha done for you (even if you don't benefit, or instructed anyone). So in order to avoid transgression one has to make sure ...


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Note that the definition of the seventy nations occurred in the Dor Hahaflagah (dispersion after the Migdal Bavel). As a result, the nations of Moav, Ammon, Yishmael, and Edom would not have been in existence at that time. I have seen references to the Vilna Gaon, such as in Nefesh Hachaim and this reference that the reference to ruling over 35 each, means ...



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