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I don't think there is Gog mentioned in the Torah. There is however Magog in parshas Noach. In Yechezkel 38 2 Rashi and Radak says Gog is king of Magog. Radak says Magog is from Yefes, Malbim also connects them to Yephes through Tuval mentioned there. Yefes is classically associated with Greece, Rabbi Kaplan brings some identifying Yefes with the Greek ...


2

The Pope is the head of state and government of the Vatican City, which is an internationally recognised nation-state. As the Vatican even controls a small military (The Swiss Guards). As an absolute monarch, he has the capacity to exert control over the military (if he desires) and is technically capable of enacting capital punishments in accordance with ...


-3

You said correctly that one makes a blessing on a king and on a great non-Jewish scholar. A king is a head of state. The Poskim debate if one recites this blessing on a president or prime-minister. The blessing is definitely not recited on a powerful person who is not a head of state. A great non-Jewish scholar is defined as one who has exceptional ...


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Jews who are impure from a corpse and non-Jews can enter the same parts of the Temple Mount. (Rambam Biat Mikdash 3:5) In the Temple times a non-Jew would be killed for entering prohibited parts of the complex. At least, that's what the sign there said.


4

To avoid repetition I will address only the relative prohibition of Jews and non-Jews, not the nature of the prohibition of non-Jews discussed fairly extensively in the linked page. At face value the prohibition of a Jewish nidda indeed seems much more severe. However, R. Yaakov Kamenetzky famously held that it was preferable to maintain a relationship ...


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The Brisker Rav explains this Gemarah as follows: In the future, all the nations will see that everything that happened in the world was for the sake of the Jewish people and their Torah learning. They will therefore ask G-d to reward them for the unanticipated effects of their actions. G-d derides them as "world-class fools", responding that they acted only ...


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It seems that there's an incorrect premise in my own question. Per the answers indicated in this question , there are several opinions stating that an Israeli is not allowed to eat Chametz on the 8th day of Pesach when he is in the U.S. I suspect that this may be a minority opinion or there are others that do allow this. I have had a few religious Israelis ...


2

The Kitzur Shulchan Aruch (סימן צ - דין עשית חפציו בלא מלאכה ומלאכה על ידי גוי) says that one may not let a non-Jew do any work that one may not do oneself. It's irrelevant of he's being paid or not. In case of a serious monetary loss, one may hint that the work should be done, but one may not discuss payment. One may make it understood that one who does ...


4

I think the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch answers your question in the following paragraphs. The paragraph you quote says: סעיף י"ד: כָּל דָּבָר שֶׁהַיִשְֹרָאֵל אָסוּר לַעֲשׂוֹתוֹ, אָסוּר לוֹמַר לְאֵינוֹ יְהוּדִי לַעֲשׂוֹתוֹ, דַּאֲמִירָה לְאֵינוֹ יְהוּדִי הֲוֵי שְׁבוּת. וַאֲפִלּוּ לִרְמוֹז לוֹ לַעֲשׂוֹתוֹ, אָסוּר. וַאֲפִלּוּ לוֹמַר לוֹ קֹדֶם שַׁבָּת ...


10

from Dose of Halacha: The Shulchan Aruch (YD 117:1) writes that one mustn’t do business with any food which is forbidden to eat mideoraisa. The Rema and Beis Yosef (YD 117) write that one mustn’t, therefore, buy such food for one’s non-Jewish workers as one stands to benefit from giving such gifts (See Kaf Hachaim YD 117:28). The Taz (YD 117:2), ...


3

I am not sure if Havarka meant this and if he did then I'll remove my answer, but I think there is a simple way to solve this. There is a Mitzvah Min Hatorah to bury a Meis Mitzvah which only applies to a dead Jew ( Rambam - Mitzvah 231). There is no Mitzvah to bury a non jew. (I believe there is a Mitzvah Midrabbanan to bury a non jew out of Darcei Sholom ...


12

Tiferet Yisrael (Boaz) on Avot 3:14 cited and translated here.


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I would eat the Jew. His body is an object used for a mitzva and such objects should be used for more mitzvas I is a prohibition to leave a body unburied and if you eat the jew first, his body won't lay out to decompose in public. If one eats the non-jew and then gets discovered before he eats the Jew, it will create ill will amongst the goyim. In ...


0

Besides for textual exclusion through רעהו a non-Jew ought to to be excluded on logical grounds as well: The Trumas Hadeshen writes (ch. 111) that the reason for the enactment of Mishloach Manos was to provide food for the Purim seudah. It is thus reasonable logically that non-Jews were never included as recipients in the enactments.



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