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The Ohr Hachaim in Parshas Ki Tetzei says in regards to the the halacha of Eshes Yefas Toar-The captive woman at the battlefield. The Ohr Hachayim writes that the soul of this gentile woman really comes from the spark of a holiness that wants to cleave to HaShem. The implication of this Ohr Hachayim is that by her being brought in to the Jewish people it ...


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If the shoveling is being done for safety, ie, to make a path for people to walk without slipping, not only is the non-Jew allowed to do so, but the Jew can do so as well.


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He does not own or rent the space and has no legal or halachik right to it, therefore he is not obligated in a mezuzah. If he wanted to put one up, it could arguably be a problem since he might not be able to guarantee its respectful removal if he moved on from that job and forgot it there. (If he did, he would not make a bracha.)


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I'm not sure that this what you're looking for, but the Gmara in Baba Batra on daf 15 writes: בתר דשכיב משה מי שריא שכינה על עובדי כוכבים והא אמר מר ביקש משה שלא תשרה שכינה על עובדי כוכבים וניתן לו, שנאמר: "ונפלינו אני ועמך". Although it doesn't specify that this was a result of Bilaam but rather a request to make Israel more unique. This Gmara is more ...


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There is a Midrash that says that since the time of Balaam (and in response to a prayer of Moses) there would never again be a gentile prophet. In which case the test is: if the gentile says he's a prophet, he's lying.


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The quick answer is no. In שו"ע יו"ד סימן קכ"ד סעיף ב the Shulchan Aruch says: גר תושב, דהיינו שקבל עליו שבע מצות, וכן גר שמל ולא טבל – מגען אוסר בשתייה Ha-rav Leichtenstien claims that the שו"ע belives that it's not only a question of "What does this man do?" (an idolator), but rather "Who is he?". And that is why we can't drink wine that was opened ...


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Yes, a Gentile can give ayin hara, as explained in this article : The Mishna in Avot[3] spells out the three negative traits that Balaam embodied: "Whoever possesses the following three traits is of the disciples of our father Abraham; and whoever possesses the opposite three traits is of the disciples of the wicked Balaam... The disciples of ...


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There appears to be a difference of opinion between contemporary authorities regarding whether and how a Jew's triggering the cooking process using some indirect electronic means grants the resulting food "cooked by a Jew" (bishul Yisrael) status. Here are some pertinent opinions that I found online, which may not be representative of the full gamut of ...


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The Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in 114:7 states: אָסוּר לִמְכּוֹר אֶת הֶחָמֵץ לְמוּמָר אוֹ לְמוּמֶרֶת; וְלֹא לְבֶן מוּמֶרֶת, אַף עַל פִּי שֶׁיְלָדַתּוּ מֵאֵינוֹ יְהוּדִי לְאַחַר שֶׁהֵמִירָה, כִּי לְעִנְיָן זֶה דִּינָם כְּמוֹ יִשְֹרָאֵל, וַהֲוֵי לֵהּ חֲמֵצוֹ שֶׁל יִשְֹרָאֵל שֶׁעָבַר עָלָיו הַפֶּסַח דְּאָסוּר בַּהֲנָאָה One may not sell one's Chametz to a Jew ...


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I don't believe that there is a specific halachic status attached to the term "goy" as there are various definitions of this term, historically, as well as currently. I have summarized the definition / distinction: Wikipedia outlines the history and usage of the term "goy". In Rabbinic terminology, it came to refer to Gentiles as a group. In modern language ...


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Please see the website here- it explains that the Phoenicians (who have the same blood and alphabet but different religion) were frequently equated with the Hebrew people. The Phoenicians were known for their ships, as were the tribe of Dan. The Spartans were even called Sephardi (form of it) before the name was given to Spain. ...


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The Ohr Hachaim in Parshas Ki Tetzei says in regards to the the halacha of Eshes Yefas Toar-The captive woman at the battlefield. that the soul of this non jewish woman really comes from the spark of a holiness that wants to cleave to HaShem. The Gemara says (Avodah Zara 2b) that HaShem went to all the nations and offered the Torah, and the nations rejected ...


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The Rivash, in Responsa 41, cited by Rema in Orach Chayim 450:6, writes that it is forbidden to purchase chometz for a non-Jew on Pesach, even using the money of the non-Jew to make the purchase. The Rivash has two points which he makes in forbidding this. The second, that the Jew is responsible for the chometz while it is under the jurisdiction of the ...


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It's understandable that the synagogue rules would ban photography inside the synagogue on the sabbath, even for gentiles. (As far as I'm aware, Jewish law does not.) Photography is forbidden for Jews then; therefore, having someone around snapping photos can be disconcerting and disturb people's sense of sabbath. That may even apply in the synagogue ...



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