Tag Info

New answers tagged

5

According to this Rivevos Ephraim 5:491 it should not be a problem since the problem is making a man stumble and come to impure thoughts and its assur during kiras shema and these things are not applicable to a non Jew. See the tshuva inside. There are two Rabbanim who answered in the tshuvah.


2

The logic of the description in The Tenets of Reform Judaism cited by @ARK96 would seem to imply that it is not a valid source for Noachides. The reason would be that Reform Judaism differs from the other major movements in that it views both the Oral and Written laws as a product of human hands Reform Judaism demands that Jews confront the claims ...


1

Well if she's around Jews and uncovered hair is treated as ervah, then she'd be stopping any nearby Jews from praying or saying any brachos. Generally it's assumed that the obligation of married women to cover is independent of the ervah status, so no it wouldn't make a difference. The Gemara in Kesubos describes the prohibition as being "in public", and ...


2

2-3 years is actually quite a short time to expect to have heard of all Halachos. You probably haven't heard a Shiur in Halacha of living a Jew either. not have you heard a Halachic Shiur on jealousy, being haughty, or anger. These aren't in the Shulchan Aruch, although it was filled in by the Magen Avraham and Mishna Berura. They don't have set ins and ...


6

We can't possibly know how God judges people after they die. We know that he is compassionate, and I think it's safe to assume that he isn't going out of his way to punish people for things they didn't really understand. On the other hand, perhaps a person who believes himself to be Jewish but still violates halacha does receive punishment even though he was ...


-1

JPS Tanakh 1917: And God spoke all these words, saying: I am the LORD thy God, who brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage. Thou shalt have no other gods before Me. For Jews specifically, this should be the number one thought. It is so important Daniel refused the king's meat, and the 3 young men refused to bow to the ...


0

No, (it may not be considered proper by some, but) there is no such specific restriction. There are several cases in the Tanach in which even "Gdolei Hador" have worked in various places, from Yaacov at Lavan's, Yosef at Pharaoh's palace and onward... When talking about a Mosque or a Church, one should know that there is a din restricting entrance to a ...


1

The Shulchan Aruch in Yoreh De'ah siman 157 siff two discusses some of your suggestions. See especially the end of the Ramma which would seemingly rule that any possible leniency of wearing clothes without any verbal proclamation would not apply being that this is not a time of gzeira but rather just a financial interest. אסור לאדם לומר שהוא עובד כוכבי' כדי ...


5

I think you are being a bit mislead by the translation of "The stranger who resides with you". In Hebrew it is using the verb form of the same word: Ger. The definitive reference to a Ger Toshev is Devarim 14:21: לֹא תֹאכְלוּ כָל נְבֵלָה לַגֵּר אֲשֶׁר בִּשְׁעָרֶיךָ תִּתְּנֶנָּה וַאֲכָלָהּ אוֹ מָכֹר לְנָכְרִי You shall not eat any carcass. You may ...


1

Commentary of Leviticus 19:18 by Rabbi Raphael Samson Hirsch ואהבת לרעך כמוך אני ה'. זה כלל מסכם לכל התנהגותנו החברתית - בדיעות, במלים ובמעשים.. ידוע מאמרו של הלל: "דעלך סני לחברך לא תעביד"..."השנוי עליך א-ל תעשה לחברך": הרי כאן שוויון גמור לכל - כעיקרון מנחה לכל פעולותינו; על - פי זה נדרוש את שלום רענו כשלומנו; נהפוך אנוכיות ואהבה עצמית לאהבת ריע ...


0

i would agree with you that it seems like most Rabbis don't interpret the verse the way you do, and mostly interpret it to mean that the miswah only applies to converts or other Jews. But sprinkled here and there in our history, there are Rabbeim who interpret the verse as you (and arguably Sefer HaChinuch) does. i'm sure there are more examples, but it ...


2

It didn't "disappear" because it wasn't one in the first place. The first sentence of the article you linked to clearly says: "the stranger referred to in these verses is the proselyte who converts and comes to live amongst the people of Israel." The Chinuch (431) adds that we can learn from this mitzvah to be compassionate to people who are not in their ...



Top 50 recent answers are included