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14

Bavli AZ 6b מנין שלא יושיט אדם כוס של יין לנזיר ואבר מן החי לבני נח ת"ל ולפני עור לא תתן מכשול Whence [do we know that] a man shouldn't pass a cup of wine to a Nazir nor a limb-from-a-live-animal to a gentile? The verse states: And before a blind person do not place a stumbling block.


11

God expects Jews to follow the torah and gentiles to follow the Noachide laws. Until you've converted you're still a gentile and don't have additional heavenly obligations. Perhaps you have heard of people in the process of conversion being required to do more. If so, it's likely a misunderstanding. Once you are studying with a rabbi he will guide you to ...


11

The first precept of Medishare's Membership Qualifications is "Christian Testimony," stating generally that All adult Members age 18 and older must attest to a personal relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ." and then specifying a "Statement of Faith" that includes quite a few assertions about the divinity of a particular man. Such affirmations are ...


9

R' Eliezer Melamed, in an essay about this blessing and a related one for Torah scholars on the Beit-El Yeshiva website, formulates the standard thus: חכם מחכמי אומות העולם שידוע כחכם וגאון באחד מן המדעים, כלכלה, מתמטיקה או אחד ממדעי הטבע, ובעבודתו תרם תרומה נכבדה למדע ולאנושות One of the scholars of the [other] nations, who is known as a scholar ...


9

Rambam rules that although it is completely Biblically prohibited to steal from a gentile (Geneva 1:1), one would only have to pay back the value he stole if he did so (2:1). There is no fine imposed in this case.


8

It depends. If you mean that until now you have been completely shaving them like a crew cut, then letting them grow a bit should be fine, no one would really notice a major change. (Click here for a full explanation on Peyos) If you mean to grow them out long until they curl around your ears or even longer, well i will tell you what my rebbe told me - ...


7

According to this Rivevos Ephraim 5:491 it should not be a problem since the problem is making a man stumble and come to impure thoughts and its assur during kiras shema and these things are not applicable to a non Jew. See the tshuva inside. There are two Rabbanim who answered in the tshuvah.


6

I think you are being a bit mislead by the translation of "The stranger who resides with you". In Hebrew it is using the verb form of the same word: Ger. The definitive reference to a Ger Toshev is Devarim 14:21: לֹא תֹאכְלוּ כָל נְבֵלָה לַגֵּר אֲשֶׁר בִּשְׁעָרֶיךָ תִּתְּנֶנָּה וַאֲכָלָהּ אוֹ מָכֹר לְנָכְרִי You shall not eat any carcass. You may ...


6

We can't possibly know how God judges people after they die. We know that he is compassionate, and I think it's safe to assume that he isn't going out of his way to punish people for things they didn't really understand. On the other hand, perhaps a person who believes himself to be Jewish but still violates halacha does receive punishment even though he was ...


5

The Torah, aka the 1st 5 books of "Old Testament" does not use the term "Jew" or in Hebrew, "Yehudi" anywhere. I think this term first appears in the book of Esther. Otherwise, the most common term in the Torah is "B'nei Yisra'el", meaning "Sons (or children) of Israel", with Israel being the name given to Jacob. At any rate, in the Torah, the term "Israel" ...


5

All rishonim agree that if it is real aver min hachai (it is included in the Torah prohibition) than it is absolutely forbidden to give to a non-Jew. If it is only a rabbinical prohibition, there is a major dispute in the rishonim and poskim. See רשב״א חולין נז ע״א ד״ה ה״ג, ר״ן שם, ועי׳ ש״ך סי׳ נה ס״ק יא, who permit when it's only a rabbinical prohibition. ...


4

In the Rambam's list of those who have no share in the world to come, in which he lists those groups generally included in the umbrella of "heretic" (מין, אפיקורס, כופרים, וכולי), he has those who deny the Torah, הכופרים בתורה (Hilchos Teshuva 3:8). At the end of the description of those who deny the Torah, he writes: והאומר שהבורא החליף מצוה זו במצוה ...


4

There are a few interesting points to address here. I am not going to go into a long discussion on all of the halachot of kashrut here because those can be found in depth around this site and elsewhere. The fact of the matter is, if you are a grunt in the kitchen of a kosher restaurant, the ingredients and utensils provided to you will be kosher and you ...


4

As many others have mentioned before, when creating laws, you HAVE to make certain distinctions. One of the biggest blindspots i've noticed with Christians trying to understand Judaism, is that they view everything from a theological perspective, and forget one very important point. Modern Christians are used to living in a society where the government is ...


4

The Yalkut Shimoni (Shoftim Ch. 4), commenting on the prophetess Devorah, says: מעיד אני עלי את השמים ואת הארץ, בין גוי בין ישראל, בין איש בין אשה, בין עבד בין שפחה, הכל לפי מעשיו של אדם רוח הקדש שורה עליו I call the heaven and earth to be my witnesses, whether a gentile or a Jew, whether a man or a woman, whether a slave or a maidservant, each ...


4

This article from Daily Halacha by Rabbi Eli J Mansour discusses the case where the torah service started with a minyan and then somebody left. In that case, he writes (without citing sources, unfortunately): This Halacha [referring to continuing after you've started the first aliya] applies only if a Minyan was present when the first Oleh began ...


4

Here are two halachic answers (1, 2) that say that this law applies these days but in any ordinary case one may not act on it because of two main reasons: The current laws of war, which do not allow this conduct, are agreed to by Jewish leaders. It would cause a great chillul Hashem.


4

Sefer Hachinuch Mitsvath 532: ונוהגת מצוה זו בזמן שישראל על אדמתן, כי אז היתה להם רשות ויכלת בידם להלחם. והעובר על זה ולא עשה המעשים שזכרנו בטל עשה זה. This commandment is practicable in time that Israel are in her Country (I am not absolutely sure that is realy the case up to day...). This is in Milhemeth Hareshuth (following Rashi in Humash ...


3

The mishna in Avos 2 14 reads ודע מה שתשיב לאפיקורוס. In his pirush hamishnayos, רמב׳ם quotes the gemara in Sanhedrin 38b that this refers specificaly to a non jewish apikores, not a jewish one, as this will cause him to become worse.


3

The logic of the description in The Tenets of Reform Judaism cited by @ARK96 would seem to imply that it is not a valid source for Noachides. The reason would be that Reform Judaism differs from the other major movements in that it views both the Oral and Written laws as a product of human hands Reform Judaism demands that Jews confront the claims ...


3

First, some background. There are several errors in your question that need to be addressed before I can answer your question directly: You falsely equate the yemoth mashiyahh and `olam haba as if they are one and the same. You are under the assumption that in `olam haba righteous yehudhim and goyim have the same or similar standing and even "rule" ...


3

The short answer is no. Lchatchila you cannot have a nonJew do a melacha for you on Shabbat. And if you see a nonJew doing melacha for you, you should persuade/rebuke him not to do so in the future. (See Aruch HaShulchan Siman 253: 36) Some possible exceptions: Bishul bchama, cooking strictly using the sun is permitted on Shabbat. There is however a ...


3

On Judaism and Jewish thought I recommend: Living Jewish: The Lore and Law of the Practicing Jew, by Michael Asheri The Book of Jewish Belief by Louis Jacobs Nine Questions People Ask About Judaism, by Dennis Prager On the the Jewish roots of Christianity: Jews and Christians: The Myth of a Common Tradition by Jacob Neusner Judaism and Christianity: A ...


3

To put it quick: There are 3 issurim which come into play with someone doing Melocha for you: Amira - speaking, or instructing to do melocha; Benefeting - deriving from melocha which was done for you; Shliach - that is having melocha done for you (even if you don't benefit, or instructed anyone). So in order to avoid transgression one has to make sure ...


3

In short if it is forbidden for you, for the gentile to do it for you, it is forbidden even if he volunteered (if he did it for a Jew). A few laws on this subject in the order they were codified Introduction The prohibition for having a gentile do a forbidden work for a Jew on shabos is Rabbinic (this was from shulchan ariuch harav 306.5) and the Rabbi's ...


3

As has been discussed in the comments on the question, I think your understanding of the word "l'havdil" is not quite accurate. "L'havdil" really just means a distinction between things that are comparable in a particular sense, but not in a general sense (because one of the items of comparison is "holier" for some definition of that word). For example, I ...


3

(I'll respond to the question as it applies to Yom Kippur, as asked. The verse in Numbers is actually talking about a different context, and the same question can be asked there — but wasn't.) According to Maimonides (Yad, T'shuva 1:3–4): T'shuva[1] atones for all sins. Even [if one was] an evildoer all his days and did t'shuva at the end, ...


3

Let's assume there were no oaths involved, simply a statement like "I will invest." Shulchan Aruch Choshen Misphat 204,7 spells out that if you commit to buy or sell, "you really should keep your word, and if you don't do so, shame on you for your lack of integrity; but the courts can't extract anything from you." Rabbi Moshe Feinstein writes in Igros Moshe ...


3

In either January of 1984 or April of 1983 (I can't tell because of the format of the book online) the Reform Movement published a responsum (#165) about whether a non-Jew may light Shabbat candles. In the responsum, they state that while it is technically problematic for a non-Jew to say the blessing which includes "... who sanctified us with his ...


3

I would recommend the Kehot version to meet your criteria of: not only accurately translates the Hebrew but also provides some brief historical context to both Pirkei Avot, in general, as well as some bio / history on each Rabbi's saying (so he can get a sense of when the rabbi lived; who he was and what important events may have caused him to state what ...



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