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You wrote: I understand that mainstream Judaism says that all sinners can do teshuva and will be forgiven their sins. It's not only mainstream Judaism that belives in the concept of Teshuva! Teshuva is explicitly mentioned in the Torah - see the Rambam on Teshuva who documents various mentions of Teshuva in the Torah. In Chapter 4 the Rambam also ...


4

While I don't claim to know much Tanya (and indeed, the only reason I know what you're referring to is because it's in the first chapter, which is about as far as I got), the way I understood that exchange was if someone viewed themselves as a Rasha, then other issues could arise from that (i.e. depression), but not that a person couldn't do Teshuva. It ...


2

Duma is a separate one as you suspected. My medrash puts a comma between them and sources 'gei' as geihinom mentioned in Yirmia 7, and Dumah is the place mentioned in psalm 115 17 'and not all those who go down to duma'. In fact Duma is also the name of the malach associated with the dead in many agadata and medrashim, see for instance maseches Brachos 18b. ...


1

Sanhedrin - cheilek (chapter 11) discusses "Olam Haba" and people who didn't get to go there. Among their number is "Bilam Ha-Rasha". Because Bilam wasn't Jewish it acts as a proof that righteous gentiles can obtain "Olam Haba" (otherwise Bilam didn't lose anything, he never had a chance in the first place) In Gittin there is a whole section (around daf 52) ...


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here is a quote on the nature of olam haba from the classic work chovos halevavos (gate 4 ch.4) Another reason (olam haba is not mentioned in the torah) is that the purpose of reward in Olam Haba is essentially clinging to G-d, and drawing near to His supernal light, as written "your righteousness will go before you, the glory of G-d will gather ...


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Sorry I don't have time to put together all the sources involved, but in general the basic confusion will come from the fact that there are two general views on the nature of Jewish eschatology, and you can read someone saying something about it and not quite know which model they are working with. One is generally attributed to the Rambam. Call it the ...


1

There is a lot to untangle in your question, but to answer just one point: So all humans die before Moshiach comes? According to the Zohar (Mishpatim 108b. Also in Midrash Ne'elam Parshas Vayeirah 113-114), yes - well almost. It isn't before Moshiach comes, but before the time of resurrection, everyone alive will die, and those deserving resurrection ...



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