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Nitei Gavriel Chanuka - page 306 mentions this in the name of Otzar Kol Minhagei Yeshurin. Rabbi Genut at din.org.il also quotes Otzar Kol Minhagei Yeshurin and says it is mentioned in Chapter 19:4 in the name of the Avodas Eved M'Lomza. YUTorah.org also gives the Otzar Kol Minhagei Yeshurin as the source. This leads me to believe that there is no earlier ...


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THIS JUST IN: According to Orchos Shabbos chapter 9 siff 13, one must warn their chinuch aged child not to use building blocks such as Lego or the like to build a house or anything which has an Ohel of a tefach by a tefach if they are going to be using the space inside of it. And if they make this edifice it is not allowed to dismantle it. This is after ...


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According to the answer at Frumtoronto.com Rabbi A Bartfeld quoting Rabbi Shlomo Miller compares it to Lego and says that it is permitted.


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The Rivevos Ephraim Chelek 8:564:1 was asked if one can blow bubbles from chewing gum(bazuka). He writes that making bubbles from soap was discussed in Shmiras Shabbas Kehilchasa perek 17:30 and says that one shouldn't make them. However, he writes that one shouldn't refrain a child from doing so,and the reason written in the name of Rav Shlomo Zalamn ...


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The Bnei Yissaschar (following on from LN6596) says that these letters are an accronym for גוף שכל נפש הכל. גוף כנגד גלות פרס where Haman tried to destroy the Jewish people physically. שכל כנגד גלות יון where the Greeks tried to destroy the Jewish people philosophically. נפש כנגד גלות בבל where the Babylonians tried to destroy the Jewish people spiritually. ...


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From: https://www.dailyhalacha.com/Display.asp?ClipDate=6/26/2006 Chacham Ovadia Yosef writes in Halichot Olam (vol. 7, p. 281) that purchasing, owning or selling dolls is permissible. He explains that Halacha forbids possessing figures of human beings because they give the appearance of idolatrous articles. When it comes to toy dolls, however, it is ...


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As has been discussed previously: The Gemara in Sanhedrin asks why "dice gamblers" are invalidated from being witnesses. One explanation is that when people gamble they're not entirely cognizant of the likelihood they'll walk away with a loss, so it's ill-gotten gains. The other explanation is that it applies only to those who are professional gamblers, "as ...


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Cards are not specifically mentioned in Gemara as far as I'm aware but there is a mention of players of dice games, in Sh'vuot, where it says that such people are not acceptable as witnesses (to claim money owed to them or admit to a partial debt in court when the disagree on the full amount). And it means they play dice for money (e.g. craps or whatever ...


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Great answer by Baal Shemot Tovot though extra sources brought here: R' Pesach Eliyahu Falk (Machazeh Eliyahu 69) writes that while joining two pieces together is permissible, one shouldn't even allow one’s children to play with Lego on Shabbos because building models could come under the prohibition of kesiva, and building a house with a roof could be ...



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