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12

According to Volume 3 Issue 8 of "Halachicly Speaking" (page 3) it is permissible for two reasons: No one bows down to snowmen A snowman does not last for very long.


9

Nitei Gavriel Chanuka - page 306 mentions this in the name of Otzar Kol Minhagei Yeshurin. Rabbi Genut at din.org.il also quotes Otzar Kol Minhagei Yeshurin and says it is mentioned in Chapter 19:4 in the name of the Avodas Eved M'Lomza. YUTorah.org also gives the Otzar Kol Minhagei Yeshurin as the source. This leads me to believe that there is no earlier ...


6

The sefer Shmiras Shabbos K'Hilchasah (16:33) paskens without reservation that dice games for recreation (not gambling) are fully permitted on Shabbos. No qualification is made for fear of writing by accident. A strict opinion (which not all hold like as Halachah) is brought by the Chayey Adam (Shabbos 11:38). He holds that any game which usually involves ...


5

Our dreidel is of relatively recent vintage and there is no evidence that it existed prior to a few centuries ago. It stood for (before it's being adapted for chanukah) N = Nisht nothing to put into the pot G = Gantz Take all H = Halbe Take half Sh = Shtel Put coins into the pot One may perhaps still find deep meaning and significance in the dreidel ...


5

I'd say, "mess away!" While relatively recent Hassidic sources have ascribed all sorts of significance to the dreidel, if I'm not mistaken the earliest sources simply discuss the practice of gambling on Chanukah. (Chavos Yair, if I'm not mistaken.) Dreidel seems to simply be a form of gambling that rabbis originally tolerated at best, that at some point ...


5

Sh'miras Shabas K'hilchasah 3:78: It is forbidden to classify mixed flatware in order to organize each type into the compartment designated for it. Likewise, it's forbidden to take all the pieces of one type and dry them and then put them in their compartment. But it's permissible to put each piece of flatware into its compartment immediately after ...


4

R' Tzvi Elimelech from Dinov (as well as the Chayey Adam) said that קרטן (cards) has the same Gematria as Satan and was the Klippa which the Greeks wanted to introduce to the Jews. Someone also pointed out that there are 36 cards which are the opposite side to the 36 Masechtos.


4

In the Dirshu Mishna Berura (based on the "Leshem") print, it is translated in a footnote as a game similar to "חמש אבנים" (lit. five stones) - when I was a kid it was called kuglach. It's similar to the game of jacks.


2

It's a form of a game called "jacks" or "knucklebones". See this. When I was young, I palyed with the round "spiky" jacks. One day, I visited my frum friends and they asked me if I wanted to play "kugelach". I said, "sounds delicious, especially if your mother made them!" I was serious; they burst out laughing, and brought out this bag of 5 golden cubes. I ...


2

There is definitely no question of Avodah Zarah if they are not worshiped or made for worshiping. As to the concern of Lo Ta'asun Iti, the prohibition of making even those statues of man not constructed for the purposes of worship, Shulchan Aruch YD 141:10 says that the statue needs to be of a full man in order to be prohibited. A bust with a head but no ...


2

This is complete conjecture, but so it's the assumption that they really played dradel with letters that stood for something. Originally, the letters were נשג׳א as per maseches Avoda Zara 36b בית דין של חשמונאי גזרו ישראל הבא על עבודת כוכבים חייב משום נשג׳א. Rashi explains נ=נדה דרבנן. ש=שפחה. ג=גויה. א=אשת איש.


2

The Bnai Yissaschar's answer (original here in the note) is that the letters נ ג ה ש should properly be rearranged to spell גשנה (lit. to Goshen). This is a reference to Bereisheis 46:28 when Yehuda is sent ahead to Goshen to prepare for the stay of Yaakov and his children in Mitzrayim. This served as the first precedent and as a perpetual reminder of the ...


2

The Bnei Yissaschar (following on from LN6596) says that these letters are an accronym for גוף שכל נפש הכל. גוף כנגד גלות פרס where Haman tried to destroy the Jewish people physically. שכל כנגד גלות יון where the Greeks tried to destroy the Jewish people philosophically. נפש כנגד גלות בבל where the Babylonians tried to destroy the Jewish people spiritually. ...


1

As has been discussed previously: The Gemara in Sanhedrin asks why "dice gamblers" are invalidated from being witnesses. One explanation is that when people gamble they're not entirely cognizant of the likelihood they'll walk away with a loss, so it's ill-gotten gains. The other explanation is that it applies only to those who are professional gamblers, "as ...


1

Cards are not specifically mentioned in Gemara as far as I'm aware but there is a mention of players of dice games, in Sh'vuot, where it says that such people are not acceptable as witnesses (to claim money owed to them or admit to a partial debt in court when the disagree on the full amount). And it means they play dice for money (e.g. craps or whatever ...


1

Traditional object not a ritual, and it should go from right to left like any other hebrew.



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