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16

http://www.hakhel.info/archivesCABs/HAKHELCOMMUNITYAWARENESSBULLETINSummerPart25764.pdf "Any toy that needs to be screwed together is prohibited because of the issur of Boneh. Therefore, one may not play with a construction set on Shabbos. On the other hand, because one merely sticks together the pieces, one is permitted to play with Legos, Tinkertoys and ...


12

Shemiras Shabbas Kehilchasah (16:32) says that "it is best to refrain" from playing games on Shabbos in which there is something to be gained or lost, and includes dreidel-playing in that category. In the notes to the Hebrew edition, he references Rema's notes to Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 338:5 (where indeed he prohibits games involving winning something ...


7

I would assume that there's no issue, as these crosses were only made for a design (in the game) and would fall under the heter of Shulchan Aruch YD 141:1, where he permits any figure presumed to have been made for merely aesthetic purposes. Even though the crosses on the gravestones are meant to be religious symbols, these particular crosses aren't ...


7

The Debreciner in Shaalos U'Tshuvos Beer Moshe Chelek 3 Siman 123 says that the Minhag is to allow one to play Dreidel with their wife while she is a Niddah. However he recommends making a Heker* - either by each one using their own Draidel or any other type of Heker. If the entire family is playing and they are not sitting next to each other then you can ...


7

I am quoting you Rabbi Ribiat The 39 Melachos: Some Poskim advise that one should not blow soap bubbles on Shabbbos because this entails a semblance of creating,which should be avoided.(One should also not deliberately form bubbles from bubble gum.)Nevertheless,one need not restrict young children from blowing the bubbles on SHABBOS.


7

According to Shemirath Shabbath, by Rabbi Yehoshua Neuwirth (Chapter 16): 23) One is allowed to play games in which letters, or parts of letters or of a picture, are placed side-by-side so as to make up a whole word or picture, provided that a. this does not involve setting the word or picture in a frame that holds it together and b. the ...


6

You seem to be asking two questions here: Is Lego© Mutar for an adult to use? How about a child? If it's only Mutar for a child, does that render it muktze for an adult? (Perhaps I'm reading into your question because of the availability of my answer, but either way it will address your question.) Hacham Ovadia Yosef, in Yechave Da'at (2:55), Addresses ...


6

http://www.torah.org/advanced/weekly-halacha/5764/vayeishev.html Children should be discouraged from playing dreidel games on Shabbos, even when playing with candy, etc.(Mishnah Berurah 322:22) A dreidel, however, is not muktzeh.(Igros Moshe Orach Chaim 5 Siman 22 Os 10)


6

According to Shabbos 103a, you're chayiv for writing two letters becuase that's how they marked the boards of the Tabernacle. However, 103b specifies that just two lines would count too. He is guilty only on account of making a mark, because marks were made on each of the boards of the Tabernacle to know which was its companion. Therefore if one draws ...


5

If the blocks are easily removed - even adults can play it. But if you need to apply some force in order to connect/remove the blocks it more miskaem, so there are different opinions on that case. When I asked about it my Rav he told that even in latter case there is no problem for adults to play it. However I've heard others that forbid playing ...


5

The Chasam Sofer is infuriated that people are gambling on Chanukah. He says if it was up to him, he'd say "if you'll pick one night to gamble anyhow, do it on December 25th when you're not learning Torah anyhow", but that would mean he'd be telling people to gamble on a night when they might not otherwise be (years such as this when chanukah falls out well ...


5

Playing Bananagrams isn't a borer issue since you choose pieces for immediate usage. This is within the category of Derech Achila- normal consumption/usage. Even at the beginning of the game when the pieces are separated, this is normal immediate usage. Kesiva (writing) isn't a problem since there is nothing to unify the letters (like a frame). In some ...


4

Check out this link: Playing Ball On Shabbat And Yom Tov, Rabbi Saul J. Berman


4

Should be pretty much the same issue as playing Monopoly or Scrabble or whatnot with your wife. (Unless you argue that the traditional aspect to it makes it less problematic, which I don't particularly hear. Then again I'm not crazy about the whole dreidel thing anyhow, and will refer you to the responsum of Chasam Sofer lamenting that this holiday is ...


4

This short article addresses the general problem of bells on Shabbath, and yes they are prohibited for adults to use. However, this answer addresses toys that would otherwise be Muktzeh and explains that, if they are essentially children's toys, they are not Muktzeh for adults. I should add, though, that I've seen in the Sefer Shemirath Shabbath ...


4

The Yam Shel Sh'lomo is the one who, disagreeing with Tosafos, distinguishes between adults and children playing ball on Yom Tov http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=14086&st=&pgnum=22&hilite=: אלא שחוק של ילדים שלא הגיעו לכלל חיוב הנח The YS"S can arguably be interpreted to refer to children below the age of chinuch. There is a Tosafos ...


4

No. The miniature Sefer Torah in your link is not a Kosher Sefer Torah. As per Rabbi Doniel Neustadt a non Kosher Torah does not receive the same respect of a Kosher Torah. And it seems to me that he is talking about a Torah that can be Kosher and became non Kosher. You are questioning regarding a Tirah that was never Kosher and is impossible to become ...


3

Rabbi Dovid Ribiat in his Sefer Lamed Tet Melachot - The 39 Melachot Vol. 3 Section 3/E)/h (pg. 822 in Melacha 23, Tofair) states: "One may not stick push pins into a bulletin board whether to hang notes or for any other purpose, because of questions involving Tofair, Boneh and other Shabbos restrictions." [emphasis mine] He bases this on a ...


3

Even running, if one takes pleasure in running, like young men who enjoy running, it is permitted (Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 301, 2), so certainly a pillow fight which is done for fun is permitted. In addition, one of the explanations for the prohibition of running is that appears as though one is running to work (see Mishna Berurah 301, 1), and this ...


3

I asked my local Orthodox rabbi: the (Chareidi) morah d'asrah of a mid-sized Orthodox shul in a North American city of about three million people. He prefers that I not specify his name here. He told me: It's crucial not to let your character do anything in the game that smacks of idolatry, such as praying to the virtual "gods" in the game. Playing the ...


3

It would appear that it is permitted, see Shemiras Shabbas K'Hilchasa 16:24 which discusses a "two dimensional" puzzle where one rearranges the pieces which are attached to a frame and rules that it is permitted. It would seem that rubix cube is even easier to permit since there is no actual picture formed. For what it is worth I think that it is an ...


2

As has been noted, the Rama in Orach Chaim 338:5 reserves his restrictions on games to when thy are played for (financial) gain, and even then suggests one not correct women and children who do lest they come to transgress willingly. Chess and other similar games are allowed according to this opinion. However the Mishneh Berurah 338:21 cites authorities who ...


2

ASSUMING IT'S LEGAL IN YOUR COUNTRY/STATE/CITY: I'd assume if there's no rule against it, you could employ whatever (fair, legal) tactics you want, including card counting. One of the discussions on the permissibility of gambling has to do with whether it's all chance (e.g. rolling fair dice), all skill (e.g. chess), or some combination. If we allow games ...


2

Maybe the answer to your question would be in the same line as the Issur of buying, selling, and renting on Shabbos which are a Gezaira lest one comes to write -see Shulchan Aruch Horav 306:4. (In other words, what if I never write when I sell anything, am I exempt from this Issur? -I don't think so.) There is also another problem with certain games on ...


2

See here an answer to that and similar questions by Rabbi Kaganoff. TL;DR According to the reasons we have applied so far, Zev may be able to keep his fancy carved chess set. No one worships the cross on the king, and one could, perhaps, argue that this is familiar enough that no one is led astray by these pieces. As mentioned above, it is meritorious ...


2

There is no prohibition against owning idolatrous figures. However, there is a prohibition against gazing as such figures, which would in general prevent one from owning them. According to Shulchan Aruch (YD 141:1) it is permitted to gaze at an idolatrous figure that is not intended for the purpose of worship. (See Rama there who includes the cross as an ...


1

I asked my local Orthodox rabbi: the (Chareidi) morah d'asrah of a mid-sized Orthodox shul in a North American city of about three million people. He prefers that I not specify his name here. He told me that, even if a game includes Greek mythological creatures, it's not a concern nowadays.


1

I don't think that counts as idol worship. Now, I guess one could say that doing such an act would be considered hana'ah because you derive benefit (in the video game) from performing such an act. However, role playing on a computer or even a board game never pops up in any literature that I have read that claims that the player is committing idol worship. ...



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