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17

In the Shul I daven in the Gabbai's father Davens there often and the Rav told him to call him up Yaamod Avi Mori. I found that Sefer Dinei Kriyas HaTorah - Rabbi Naftali Hoffner says that you should call the father up as Yaamod Avi U'Mori........


15

The Shu"t Beit Avi (5:56) was asked this question and concludes that one should call him up as "Abba Isaac ben Moses" (for example). He says that by using the honorific "Abba" one alleviates the issue of calling one's parent by their first name (outlined in Shulchan Aruch YD 240:2). He notes that even though the Shulchan Aruch sounds like it is forbidden to ...


8

In the back of the Chumash Shai LeMorah, a list and hierarchy of the the people who are obligated to receive an Aliyah to the Torah. He adds parenthetically as follows: It is written in the Sefer Avodat Hakodesh of the Chida Z"l that there is a custom in Eretz Yisroel that someone whose wife enters her 9th month of pregnancy should be careful to do the ...


6

It depends on the synagogue, and depends what you're being asked to do. I'll assume the synagogue is Ashkenazic. If you're being asked to open the aron (cabinet holding the Torah scrolls) for a particular prayer, but the scrolls are not to be removed, then the first step is to approach the aron at the appropriate time. (Actually, as mentioned in the other ...


6

I was talking to a friend of mine today about this question and he told me that recently he was in a Shul and no one wanted to Daven Musaf for the Amud. The Gabai has already Davened Shacharis and read the Kriyas HaTorah. So the Gabai made a loud announcement "Good Shabbos - Thanks for all of you joining with our Minyan. I am leaving now and will come back ...


5

I would arrange for a chazan ahead of time, not right before davening. You probably know who the good chazanim are, so simply ask them a few days in advance and make a schedule (for yourself).


4

I have been a gabbai and the way I was trained was יעמוד בני יוסף without mentioning my own name. That is also the way that I have seen other gabbaim do it. When my sons who are gabbaim mention their children in a mi shebeirach (as an example) they also say 'Bni Ploni' or 'Biti Ploni' without using ben or bas and their names. When they call up their ...


4

This halacha is brought in Shulchan Aruch 53:16 Here are some clarifications: 1) A regular/permanent Shliach Tzibur does not need to refuse. (On the contrary, if a regular Shliach Tzibur refuses he shows that it is beneath his dignity to daven until the congregation pleads with him [see Beit Yosef and Shulchan Aruch Harav 53:19]) 2) If requested by an ...


4

In Sefer Nishmat Avraham- Orach Chaim Siman 123 The Pardes Yosef offers a number of reasons why it is unnecessary to change the text of a prayer on his behalf. First: It is known that one's soul is considered to have "limbs" corresponding to the physical limbs of the body and, although he has lost one of his physical limbs, all of his spiritual "limbs" are ...


4

By a lady - who has 252 limbs (Bechoros 45.) א"ר יהודה אמר שמואל מעשה בתלמידיו של ר' ישמעאל ששלקו זונה אחת שנתחייבה שריפה למלך בדקו ומצאו בה מאתים וחמשים ושנים אמר להם שמא באשה בדקתם שהוסיף לה הכתוב שני צירים ושני דלתות - we say L'Chol Aivoreho, U'Lchol Gideha - so I would think (no source yet) that if a man is either missing a limb or has extra that we ...


2

http://thetorahcenter.com/page.asp?pageID=56F73177-782C-4F25-8F70-A6DC14F11327&displayAll=1 The Birchas Ephraim 60 (This is a pamphlet that is printed as an addendum to Pischei Sh'earim, Talmudic novellae by Rabbi Yisachar of Tchenstechow - Bilgurei 5660). says as follows: "My children, do not forget to introduce the tradition from our master, ...


2

Do you have a Tallit? You'll need one (in some synagogues you can get away without one if it's a weekday and you're wearing Tefilin). The biggest "gotcha" I recall is that you need to be around afterwards to put it back!


2

According to Siddur Rabbeinu Hazakein, the Lubavitcher Rebbe would wait until after Kaddish was over, right before Shemoneh Esrei. However during the years תש״נ ־ תנש״א / 1990 - 1991 Kaddish would not start until after the Sefer Torah was already put back in the Aron, so yehalelu was said before kaddish. As regards actual practice, every Lubavitcher minyan ...


2

One way to solve this would be to make sure somebody diligent [and somewhat aggressive] is given a Tikkun/Chumash which highlights these things, and have him correct you when needed. The Simanim Tikun comes to mind. If you want as few corrections as possible, highlight those few instances that are critical in the Chumash/Tikun you give him.


2

One thing you can do is ask the gabay rishon (chief gabay) if the person standing on the other side of the bima (table) can be a person of your choosing instead of or in addition to the usual gabay sheni (vice-gabay; or instead of no one) and pick someone who you know knows grammar and will correct you. I've done this one the rare occasion that I was reading ...


2

As far as I know there is no official order, you can do it in any order that you prefer.


1

What I've always seen done was יעמוד בני יוסף בן שמעון where the Gabbai is Shimon.


1

From practical experience the #1 problem is a tight circle which is not large enough for all the congregants. My Shul used to have this problem and has stopped having this problem when they expanded the circle size according to the size of the crowd. Some Shuls may not have the liberty of expanding the circle size due to the set up, and some just may have ...


1

In my experience, the function of the one to two men (besides the reader and ole) at the bima in an Ashk'naz synagogue varies from synagogue to synagogue. In some, one calls olim and both check for accuracy in reading; in others, one calls olim and the other says some of the "mi sheberach" prayers; in others, there's but one worker standing there; in others, ...


1

Contrary to what the previous answer states, there can be a phonemic difference in many of these instances. If one pronounces an unaspirated /bet/ as a /waw/, for example, it might be mistaken for a conjunctive; if one usually differentiates between a /tav/ and a /sav/, the use of the former in a situation where the previous word sounds as though it ...


1

In between aliyos, the custom is to permit talking when important. During kaddish, chazaras hashatz, and during the actual kriyah, I don't think it's allowed.


1

I've seen the Gabbai Sheni say it instead, to avoid the distasteful move of calling out "God bless me!"


1

My son is gabbai and asked our Rav what to do. He calls me up and refers to me in the brocho afterwards as אבי מורי הכהן. In the brocho afterwards he refers to all other family members as he would for anyone else, i.e. אשתו, בניו, בנותיו etc and not אמי, אחי, אחיותי


1

I have been a gabbai and my sons are gabbaim. My sons refer to their brothers as 'Ploni ben Avi Mori' and their sons as 'Bni Ploni' without using their own names. I think that they would also refer to their wives as 'Ishti Plonis bas Ploni' and that is often how I would do it when I was gabbai. Note that we would first check with the rav of the shul to make ...


1

I've always seen people saying it right after the end of kaddish, before taking the steps back for the Amidah.


1

Just be careful not to mess up the grammatical references. Sometimes the gabbai will say העולה ואת אשתו פב"פ ואת אביו פב"פ ואת אמו פב"פ ואת בנו פב"פ ואת בנו פב"פ At a certain point it becomes very unclear who the 'his' is referring to. Is it the father's son? The son's son's son? The gabbai should either switch to saying ואת בן העולה פב"פ or group the ...



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