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11

Moshe had a very different role in all sorts of ways. One answer might be, based on the Meshech Chochmah, that Moshe had a higher level of prophecy than anyone else, but because of that, there was the problem that people might think he was a god too. Also, he was such a great leader that the people felt they couldn't manage without him (that's why they ...


11

after the circumcision, the foreskin is buried (some prepare a dish with dirt in it to "bury" the foreskin immediately). Some bury it in earth that has a new tree planted in it as a symbolic connection but the operative point is respect and burial for the body part. cf Do surgically removed body parts require Kevurah? the comments on the question which ...


10

See question #533 over here: Many contemporary Poskim rule that teeth that fall out or are extracted may simply be discarded and do not require burial or any other special treatment. There is no difference between adults and children or between baby teeth or permanent teeth. See Shu"t Mishneh Halachos Vol. 16 Siman 113 where he brings some ...


10

There are a number of reasons, but one is that Jewish law mandates that the human body be treated with respect, even after death. This is true for both Jews and non-Jews, since we are all created "in the image of G-d" (Gen. 1:27); for Jews there is the additional idea that the body was in its lifetime a vehicle for mitzvos (the Divine commandments), and so ...


10

This is a matter of dispute in the Mishna Oholos 2:2. Rabbi Eliezer says one quarter kav worth of ash does transmit impurity, whilst the Sages say it does not transmit impurity at all. Rambam (Hilchos Tumas Meis 3:9-10) rules like the Sages.


9

See this Chabad.org article. In short, the answer is yes. While getting a tattoo is forbidden, once one has one there is no law that he/she cannot be buried in a Jewish cemetery. However, every Jewish burial society has the right to enact their own rules...


8

The Torah itself says (Ex. 22:30) that the meat of an animal that is tereifah (fatally injured) should be "thrown to the dogs." Now, granted, the animal wasn't necessarily a pet when it was alive (whether anyone back then kept pets is pretty uncertain anyway), but you had the obligation to feed it before yourself (Berachos 40a based on Deut. 11:15), and you ...


8

Some base the Kadish for the soul on the date of death. Others say it goes from the date of the burial (See Pnei Baruch 34:9). The amount of time a soul should have the kadish is the 12 months of geihinom. The minhag is to retract this to 11 months so that it doesn't appear as if the son is assuming his parent needed geihinom (Rema YD 276:4). I have ...


7

It depends on the family's preferences a lot but also on their minhagim. For example, I've been to Litvish (Lithuanian style) funerals where the hespeidim (eulogies) took hours. On the other hand, the Chabad minhag is not to have hespeidim at all, so the funeral is usually as long as a Kel Malei Rachamim, Tziduk Hadin, Tehillim, Kadish, and the time it ...


7

Graveside service? Half an hour, most of the time. If I recall correctly, that's what I was told by an experienced rabbi. The big variables here are speeches and the actual burial. Any remarks made graveside are usually brief and fit within the half hour, but you never know. As for the burial, assuming those present are doing the mitzva of shoveling ...


7

The Rabbis at the time ruled that since the dead could not be moved from the Old City they should be moved into a temporary grave until an opportunity would allow them to be re-interned on the Mount of Olives. Unfortunately that took another 19 years to happen. .. in the Jewish Quarter of the Old City of Jerusalem some 40 fighters and others who were ...


6

I was always under the impression that it was because the tombstones were placed primarily in order to warn Kohanim of where the graves were, and thus they were laid flat over the grave to cover it(see Mishnah Oholot 15:8 and 15:9 with surrounding commentaries). Since children's graves are by nature smaller, the stones laid upon them to cover them would by ...


6

In “Mourning in Halachah”, Rabbi C B Goldberg, ArtScroll, 1991, p82, it says “If a family member is accompanying the deceased on a ship airplane or auto” and goes on to deal with the laws on aninus in this case. The same Halachah is brought in the original Hebrew sefer para 61. It seems to follow that according to Rav Goldberg, there is nothing wrong with ...


6

Shulchan Aruch, Yoreh De'ah 362:4 states: אין נותנין ב' ארונות זה על זה... ואם יש ביניהם עפר ששה טפחים מותר "One may not bury two coffins one atop the other... But if there is six tefachim of dirt between them, it is permissible." (Gra and R. Akiva Eiger there cite Beis Yosef, who in turn cites Terumas Hadeshen, that indeed three tefachim is ...


6

The Rambam (Hil. Avel, 4:4) presents this custom as halacha, and he is followed by many other rishonim including the Rokeach (Hil. Aveilus, 313), Sefer HaAgudah (B'rachos, Chapter 9), Kol Bo (§ 114), and the Ramban (Toras HaAdam, Sha'ar HaSof, Inyan HaHotza'ah). This custom is also presented by such later authorities as the Beit Yosef (YD 376) and, more ...


6

Gittin 61 Says we bury the dead of non-Jews with dead of Jews. (קוברים מתי עכו"ם עם מתי ישראל). This is mipnei darkei shalom Rashi there comments that the gemarra shouldn't be understood as "with" literally, but "also" like we bury our own, when we find them together. Rambam brings gemarra down as is. Tur brings down gemarra and Rashi. Beis Yosef notes ...


6

Chazal has said that if we begin a mitzvah that we cannot complete on our own, G-d will complete it for us. We could not part the waters at the Sea, alone, but we had to take the first step into the water. See, e.g. Rashi to Exodus 14:15. Moreover, we accept that as mortal humans, we may not be perfect, per se, but that if we make efforts to seek perfect ...


5

See the Q&A cited in yydl's answer to a related question: Rashi to Berachos there says that it was a piece less than the size of a barleycorn, which isn't subject to tum'ah and therefore doesn't require burial. Aruch, and Rashbam to Bava Basra 116a (both cited in Mesores Hashas to Berachos there) explain that it was a tooth, which according to many ...


5

The Chevra Kadisha in Yerushalayim strictly does not allow a person's children or grandchildren to be present at his burial. This is based on non-halachic, Kabbalistic considerations. This is not because of anything the son may have done, but because the person who passed away may be guilty of certain sins. In any case, I have never heard of this minhag ...


5

Rambam Laws of Tefilin, Mezuzah, and Sefer Torah 1:13: יג ספר תורה תפילין ומזוזות שכתבן מין, יישרפו. כתבן גוי, או ישראל משומד, או מוסר, או עבד, או אישה, או קטן--הרי אלו פסולין וייגנזו: שנאמר "וקשרתם . . . וכתבתם" (דברים ו,ח-ט; דברים יא,יח-כ)--כל שמוזהר על הקשירה ומאמין בה, הוא שכותב. נמצאו ביד מין ואין ידוע מי כתבן, ייגנזו; נמצאו ביד גוי, כשרים. ...


5

There is no religious requirement in Judaism for a non-Jewish man to wear a head covering. However, since a public request was made, some attendees might feel that it is disrespectful or insensitive to appear without a head covering. As a practical concern, and out of sensitivity to the family, I would therefore recommend wearing a head covering. Either a ...


4

See here and here. The gemara (Beitza 6a) rules that burial on yom tov sheni is permissible, and Rambam and Shulchan Aruch rule like the opinion in the gemara that even things that are not strictly necessary for burial may be done if they are in the spirit of kavod hames, since yom tov sheni is treated as a weekday with regards to burial. However, ...


4

Gesher Hachayim, volume 1, chapter 25, paragraphs 1–2 says: A renowned [word I don't recognize] who has separated himself from the ways of Jewry and who has removed from himself the entire yoke of the law of the Jews: there's no avelus (mourning) for him... but one must bury him and work toward his burial and with dressing him therefor.... But ...


4

Some that I know of: There is a grave in Silwan (the old City of David), with an inscription in ancient Hebrew script identifying it as the tomb of "יהו אשר על הבית...". It's definitely from First Temple times, and it is speculated to have been built for Shevna, King Chizkiyahu's faithless chief of staff (Isaiah 22:15ff, Sanhedrin 26a-b). The tombs in the ...


4

The Shulchan Aruch O.C. 4:18 brings a mixed list of things that require "washing". Some require water for Ruach Raa, others for cleanliness preceding davening, etc. The S.A. there brings an opinion to wash after walking among the dead (a cemetery). The Mishna Berura there (39) says that the only area that absolutely requires 3x/hand is when one wakes up, ...


4

There's a place in Tiberias that is supposed to be the common gravesite of several prominent women from Tanach; a sign there lists Bilhah, Zilpah, Yocheved, Tzipporah, Elisheva, and Avigayil. I have no idea of the provenance of this tradition. Some pictures, and directions, are here.


4

Shulchan Aruch (Yoreh De'ah 301:7 and 351:1) states that tachrichim (burial shrouds) may be made from shaatnez. Which would mean that, from the point of view of halachah, they don't have to be pure linen. That said, Pischei Teshuvah (351:2) cites Yalkut Reuveni that for kabbalistic reasons only linen should be used, and not a single stitch should be of any ...


4

I came across this list of sources that discuss it: שו"ת דעת כהן, סימן ריד: יש לומר, שהיה קבור במערה עמוקה תחת הקרקע, שהיתה לו ולמשפחתו קרקע חוץ ממקום המקדש, וחפרו מערה והאריכו אותה עד שהגיעה תחת המזבח Responsa Daath Kohen, 214: One can suggest that it was buried in a cave deep beneath the ground which belonged to him and his family, and they had ...


3

The question is a bit stronger than worded above, so allow me first to restate it. The pasuk has the Jews demanding of Moshe, "Did you take us to die in the desert because of a lack of graves in Egypt?". The question we're addressing here is why they mentioned that Egypt has graves. It seems odd. If they wanted to stress that dying is just as possible in ...



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