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13

Moshe had a very different role in all sorts of ways. One answer might be, based on the Meshech Chochmah, that Moshe had a higher level of prophecy than anyone else, but because of that, there was the problem that people might think he was a god too. Also, he was such a great leader that the people felt they couldn't manage without him (that's why they ...


11

See this Chabad.org article. In short, the answer is yes. While getting a tattoo is forbidden, once one has one there is no law that he/she cannot be buried in a Jewish cemetery. However, every Jewish burial society has the right to enact their own rules...


11

See question #533 over here: Many contemporary Poskim rule that teeth that fall out or are extracted may simply be discarded and do not require burial or any other special treatment. There is no difference between adults and children or between baby teeth or permanent teeth. See Shu"t Mishneh Halachos Vol. 16 Siman 113 where he brings some ...


11

after the circumcision, the foreskin is buried (some prepare a dish with dirt in it to "bury" the foreskin immediately). Some bury it in earth that has a new tree planted in it as a symbolic connection but the operative point is respect and burial for the body part. cf Do surgically removed body parts require Kevurah? the comments on the question which ...


11

This is a matter of dispute in the Mishna Oholos 2:2. Rabbi Eliezer says one quarter kav worth of ash does transmit impurity, whilst the Sages say it does not transmit impurity at all. Rambam (Hilchos Tumas Meis 3:9-10) rules like the Sages.


11

On chabad.org it says the following: On the way out of the cemetery, it is customary to pull out some grass, throw it back over the shoulder, and recite the passage below. This symbolizes the Resurrection of the Dead in the era of Moshiach, when the body will awaken and return from the dust of the earth, as it is written, "And may they blossom ...


10

There are a number of reasons, but one is that Jewish law mandates that the human body be treated with respect, even after death. This is true for both Jews and non-Jews, since we are all created "in the image of G-d" (Gen. 1:27); for Jews there is the additional idea that the body was in its lifetime a vehicle for mitzvos (the Divine commandments), and so ...


10

The Rabbis at the time ruled that since the dead could not be moved from the Old City they should be moved into a temporary grave until an opportunity would allow them to be re-interned on the Mount of Olives. Unfortunately that took another 19 years to happen. .. in the Jewish Quarter of the Old City of Jerusalem some 40 fighters and others who were ...


9

See Yoreh Deah 362 Pischei Teshuva #1 were it seems amputated organs need not be buried, but consult your LOR (local orthodox Rabbi). Also see Kesuvos 20b where the custom is to bury amputated organs.


9

The Torah itself says (Ex. 22:30) that the meat of an animal that is tereifah (fatally injured) should be "thrown to the dogs." Now, granted, the animal wasn't necessarily a pet when it was alive (whether anyone back then kept pets is pretty uncertain anyway), but you had the obligation to feed it before yourself (Berachos 40a based on Deut. 11:15), and you ...


8

Graveside service? Half an hour, most of the time. If I recall correctly, that's what I was told by an experienced rabbi. The big variables here are speeches and the actual burial. Any remarks made graveside are usually brief and fit within the half hour, but you never know. As for the burial, assuming those present are doing the mitzva of shoveling ...


8

Some base the Kadish for the soul on the date of death. Others say it goes from the date of the burial (See Pnei Baruch 34:9). The amount of time a soul should have the kadish is the 12 months of geihinom. The minhag is to retract this to 11 months so that it doesn't appear as if the son is assuming his parent needed geihinom (Rema YD 276:4). I have ...


8

The Shulchan Aruch (YD 345:3) writes: קטן המאבד עצמו לדעת, חשוב כשלא לדעת A minor who knowledgeably destroys himself is considered as if it was not done knowledgeably so it seems we would treat it like any other regular case of death.


7

It depends on the family's preferences a lot but also on their minhagim. For example, I've been to Litvish (Lithuanian style) funerals where the hespeidim (eulogies) took hours. On the other hand, the Chabad minhag is not to have hespeidim at all, so the funeral is usually as long as a Kel Malei Rachamim, Tziduk Hadin, Tehillim, Kadish, and the time it ...


7

I was always under the impression that it was because the tombstones were placed primarily in order to warn Kohanim of where the graves were, and thus they were laid flat over the grave to cover it(see Mishnah Oholot 15:8 and 15:9 with surrounding commentaries). Since children's graves are by nature smaller, the stones laid upon them to cover them would by ...


7

Chazal has said that if we begin a mitzvah that we cannot complete on our own, G-d will complete it for us. We could not part the waters at the Sea, alone, but we had to take the first step into the water. See, e.g. Rashi to Exodus 14:15. Moreover, we accept that as mortal humans, we may not be perfect, per se, but that if we make efforts to seek perfect ...


7

The reason that we keep 2 days on all festivals outside of Israel is because originally it was a doubt whether the new month had been declared, and word did not reach far enough for them to know by the middle of the month. Even once the calendar was set, they maintained the minhag of their predecessors (Beitza 4b). The Ba'al HaMe'or to Beitza 5a explains ...


7

Out of respect for the deceased, we do not put bodies on display. Even the mourners (the immediate family) only look long enough to confirm identity. As Dr. Ron Wolfson writes at My Jewish Learning: "The deceased is a [nireh v'ayno roeh], someone who is seen but who cannot see. To open the casket and allow people to look at the deceased is to turn the ...


7

You asked: Is this a Jewish minhag? If so, what is the source for it? Yes. it is mentioned in the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 199:10 - סימן קצט - דין הקבורה ובית הקברות "The custom - when leaving a cemetery - is to pluck some grass and throw it behind one's back, and say זָכוּר כִּי עָפָר אֲנָחְנוּ - remember that we are dust." You asked: What does it mean? ...


6

In “Mourning in Halachah”, Rabbi C B Goldberg, ArtScroll, 1991, p82, it says “If a family member is accompanying the deceased on a ship airplane or auto” and goes on to deal with the laws on aninus in this case. The same Halachah is brought in the original Hebrew sefer para 61. It seems to follow that according to Rav Goldberg, there is nothing wrong with ...


6

Shulchan Aruch, Yoreh De'ah 362:4 states: אין נותנין ב' ארונות זה על זה... ואם יש ביניהם עפר ששה טפחים מותר "One may not bury two coffins one atop the other... But if there is six tefachim of dirt between them, it is permissible." (Gra and R. Akiva Eiger there cite Beis Yosef, who in turn cites Terumas Hadeshen, that indeed three tefachim is ...


6

See the Q&A cited in yydl's answer to a related question: Rashi to Berachos there says that it was a piece less than the size of a barleycorn, which isn't subject to tum'ah and therefore doesn't require burial. Aruch, and Rashbam to Bava Basra 116a (both cited in Mesores Hashas to Berachos there) explain that it was a tooth, which according to many ...


6

The Rambam (Hil. Avel, 4:4) presents this custom as halacha, and he is followed by many other rishonim including the Rokeach (Hil. Aveilus, 313), Sefer HaAgudah (B'rachos, Chapter 9), Kol Bo (§ 114), and the Ramban (Toras HaAdam, Sha'ar HaSof, Inyan HaHotza'ah). This custom is also presented by such later authorities as the Beit Yosef (YD 376) and, more ...


6

Gittin 61 Says we bury the dead of non-Jews with dead of Jews. (קוברים מתי עכו"ם עם מתי ישראל). This is mipnei darkei shalom Rashi there comments that the gemarra shouldn't be understood as "with" literally, but "also" like we bury our own, when we find them together. Rambam brings gemarra down as is. Tur brings down gemarra and Rashi. Beis Yosef notes ...


6

Rambam Laws of Tefilin, Mezuzah, and Sefer Torah 1:13: יג ספר תורה תפילין ומזוזות שכתבן מין, יישרפו. כתבן גוי, או ישראל משומד, או מוסר, או עבד, או אישה, או קטן--הרי אלו פסולין וייגנזו: שנאמר "וקשרתם . . . וכתבתם" (דברים ו,ח-ט; דברים יא,יח-כ)--כל שמוזהר על הקשירה ומאמין בה, הוא שכותב. נמצאו ביד מין ואין ידוע מי כתבן, ייגנזו; נמצאו ביד גוי, כשרים. ...


6

There is no religious requirement in Judaism for a non-Jewish man to wear a head covering. However, since a public request was made, some attendees might feel that it is disrespectful or insensitive to appear without a head covering. As a practical concern, and out of sensitivity to the family, I would therefore recommend wearing a head covering. Either a ...


6

From http://www.dinonline.org/2011/05/25/burial-at-sea/ A number of sources indicate that burial in the sea is not considered burial. See Pirkei De-Rabbi Eliezer (Chap. 39) concerning the Egyptians in the sea, and Yerushalmi (Shabbos 19b) concerning drowning. The idea of burial is that the person is interned on land, where the dead will someday be ...


6

Based on a shiur by Rav Amnon Bazak at Yeshivat Har Etzion quoting the Arugas Habosem the amount paid by Avraham was enough to buy 2.4 million square Amos. In an extraordinary piece of arithmetic computation, the Arugat Ha-bosem proves that 400 shekel - the price of sdei ha-machpela - was enough to buy 2.4 million square amot, based on the price of ...


5

Maybe to intensify the grief ("agmas nefesh" - see Berachos 5b with Rashi ד"ה ביר regarding R' Yochanan's practice to carry with him a bone of the tenth son he buried).



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