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12

Stuff that grows by itself on public property is exempt from the rules of orla. Source: Radvaz's commentary to Rambam, Maaser Sheni 10:6 (though it's pretty clear from the Rambam himself, 10:5).


8

The latter is correct. Assuming you ate a proper shiur of both the pastry and the grapes (which creates a requirement for a bracha achrona), you would combine the bracha achrona. However, the correct order would be "al hamichya v'al hakalkalah, v'al haetz v'al pri haetz" (על המחיה ועל הכלכלה, ועל העץ ועל פרי העץ) In general, the correct order is: Al ...


8

The basic rule is that if the two types to be cross-grafted are similar either in the shape of their leaves or the appearance of their fruit, then it is permitted to crossbreed them. There are some exceptions to this, such as if the taste of the two fruits is very different. (Rambam, Hil. Kilayim 3:4ff) Applying this rule, then, to your cases: Rema (Yoreh ...


8

Another answer (suggested here in the Sefer "Kerem Efraim") is that because the tree was created through a miracle, it was not obligated in Orlah. He brings support from the Radak (Malachim Beis 100:4) who writes that the oil that was miraculously created for the wife of Ovadia did not require Maaser to be separated from it. He explains that for the first ...


7

The question is whether or not it halachically qualifies as a "tree." This has ramifications regarding orlah, as well: In Eretz Yisrael, where even doubtful orlah is forbidden, classifying papaya as a tree fruit would effectively render it prohibited, since most commercially available papaya is from the first three years of the plant's life. Some views ...


6

When I was young, my older brother and I counted a bunch of pomegranates. Some totaled 607, 624, and other numbers in that area. Although none totaled exactly 613, in our series of counting the average came out to 613! Thanks to msh, at the bottom of R. Zivotofsky's article I found that someone has an ongoing experiment regarding just this question and so ...


6

Taamei HaMinhagim 706 says it is done for Kabalistic reasons. In the notes, he mentions in the name of the Imrei Noam that the Gematria of the word "Tapuach" (the Hebrew word for apple) is the same as the Gematria of "S'e Akeida" - so we eat the apple to recall the Akeida (Binding of Isaac).


5

There is specific symbolism in the apple. It also can't be discounted that apples are harvested around Rosh Hashana time so they are a readily available and relatively inexpensive fruit at that time.


5

1) The Maharil explains that the apple is connected with "חקל תפוחים קדישין"; when Yaakov came to get the brochos from Yitzchok, he had the smell of an apple orchard upon his clothing. Besides for the Kabbilistic meanings, (according to one opinion) this episode happened on Rosh Hashana (GR”A O.C. 583:8) 2) There are three types of benefit derived from an ...


5

When one picks fruits owned by a Jew in Israel, he is allowed to snack on them (אכילת עראי) until they become designated for maaser (נקבע למעשר), or, if he is planning on selling them, until he finishes his work on the harvest (גמר מלאכה). After that, he cannot eat from them at all until properly tithing them. The most common ways of designating for maaser ...


4

After CYLORing this, the answer I got is: If the tree is planted exclusively for beauty - there is no problem to enjoy from the fruits during first 3 years, and even to eat them. If the tree is planted also for eating the fruits - it is forbidden to enjoy from the fruits, even from observing (להתבונן) their beauty. However, there is no problem just to look ...


4

See this link to chabad who explains this well. http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/1109802/jewish/Why-Eat-Carob-on-Tu-BShevat.htm There are more reasons,but have to find them.


4

What I'd heard about the baby-cut carrots was a wheat-based enzyme used to keep them nice and bright orange (not a coloring per se), which posed a problem for Passover, but not the rest of the year. There are the problems with fruit grown in the first 3/4 years, as well as all sorts of special rules for produce grown in Israel. Also, there's some ...


4

Fruits from a tree are forbidden to eat for the first three years. This is called Orlah. And, although I can't find a link now, the OU requires baby carrots have a hechsher, since the manufacturers use a color lock to keep the nice orange color. The color lock is an edible spray that is sprayed on the carrot before it is put in the bags.


4

1) Check the Star-K's guide to insect checking, appropriately named: http://www.checkforinsects.com/ 2) Here is a Tu Bishvat guide for this year (5771), based on the sefer of R' Moshe Vaye: http://www.jerusalemkoshernews.com/wp-content/uploads/shvat_5771_english.pdf.


4

As already stated, this site does not replace a Rabbi. But here are some sources. The Mishan in Mas. Orla (3:10) says: ספק העורלה--בארץ ישראל אסור, ובסוריה מותר; ובחוצה לארץ יורד ולוקח, ובלבד שלא יראנו לוקט. If in doubt, then fruit that could be Orla are forbidden in Eretz Yisrael, but permitted in the Diaspora. That's also have the Shulchan Aruch ...


3

Sefer Chemdas Yomim from Rabbi Binyomin HaLevi in Tzefas brings down the Seder in the following links http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=49705&st=&pgnum=288 http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=49705&st=&pgnum=289 http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=49705&st=&pgnum=290


3

I can only speak of sephardi custom, but there the custom is to make HaEitz on the pomegranate, adamah on something like the beans, and hakol on either the meat items(heart, lung, head). This order can typically be found in any Sephardi Mahzor. The two I am most familiar with are Ish Matzliah and Shulhan Melekhim.


3

Just to contribute a tiny bit of data (while agreeing with the other answers that the count varies): Tonight I was dismantling a pomegranate while waiting for dinner to cook, and one thing led to another, and I found that this single data point had exactly 613 seeds. I only eat about one or two pomegranates a year, so I am unlikely to collect a ...


3

I heard that "filled with mitzvot as a pomegranate" is not a reference to a certain number, or even an abundance, but the "fullness". The phrase אפילו ריקים שבכם מלאים מצוות כרימון is explained as being full like a pomegranate. When a pomegranate grows, its seeds fill it up leaving no space, as opposed to other fruit we know that have some extra space or ...


3

The reason that pas haba b'kisanin is not a hamotzi is because it is made in such a way that it is not eaten as bread (Beis Yosef 168 s.v. ומה), even though it still is bread (Rambam Hil. Berachos 3:9, although Taz 168:10 implies otherwise). Something which is added in but does not remove the bread from being eaten as normal bread does not create this ...


3

Regarding the definition (Geder) of what a liquid is: The Shulchan Aruch HaRav writes in Seder Bircat Hanehenin 8:8 אוכל שנימוח כ״כ עך שראוי לשתייה - יצא מתורה אוכל. וכן:משקה שנקרש עד שראוי לאכילה - יצא מתורת משקה - אפי' יש בו טופח ע״מ להטפיח (And in my own free translation:) A food which has dissolved to the extent that it is suitable to ...


3

I found in a Sefer "Toras HaShabbos Chelek Alef" (a modern day kitzur Sefer that he addresses this point. See Perek 15 on Hilchos Borer Footnote 102 (towards the end.) He writes that seemingly it should be ossur to remove the rock so why does the SA allow this. He says that could be the reason is is because the person is not m'cavain (doesn't have the ...


3

In most Halachic cases, we say that Mitzvoth are violated only if there is a Ma'aseh - an action. However, this article asks the very question you ask, with regard to aesthetic trees, but it does not give an answer (because the "tree" in his case was not a Halachic one). In fact, he implies both that the prohibition is strictly on eating the fruit, and that ...


2

See Mishnah Orlah 1:5 Raav Bartenurah where he says that if the branch was detached and then grafted, then we start counting the 3 years from when it was grafted. But if it was grafted in a way that it's still attached to it's original tree, then we don't start counting again. Basically, once it's detached and replanted (translate grafted) the counting ...


2

two chiddushim of my own that I have not seen elsewhere. the pyre on the mizbeach is described as an apple. We are adjured not to offer up honey on the mizbeach because no man can stand it, but l’atid lavo we will be able to offer up honey on the mizbeach - so our tefillah is that the year should be sweet enough for us to do so and thus we dip the apple in ...


2

It would depend if he had permission to make this salad. If he had permission, he is considered a Mazik B'rshus and would be patur. If he did not have permission, he could still be patur if he had good reason to assume that the Esrog was a lemon. Source: http://www.torah.org/advanced/business-halacha/5757/vol1no24.html


2

Apple was the most widely known fruit. Think of the other fruits and vegetables that are called after the apple eg orange in Hebrew, potatoe in Hebrew, French and German, pineapple in English. See here "In Middle English and as late as 17c., it was a generic term for all fruit other than berries but including nuts (e.g. O.E. fingeræppla "dates," lit. ...


2

1.If one eats (regular uncooked) fruit in a meal one should make a Bracha Rishona on the fruit but no Bracha Achrona(S”A 177:2) 2.A cooked dish made from fruit and is served as part of the main meal doesn’t require it’s own Bracha. For example, fruit soup, fruit salad, fritter, fruits mixed with chicken or meat, and fruit blintzes don’t require a Bracha ...


2

We wish to have a sweet year. We symbolize this with sweet food: apples, honey. Thus, no pun is necessary. A pun is necessary for, say, leek, since it lacks sweetness. Dates would, I suppose, not need a pun, since they're sweet — but we can get a pun in, too, so we do. Source: my own conjecture.



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