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12

Stuff that grows by itself on public property is exempt from the rules of orla. Source: Radvaz's commentary to Rambam, Maaser Sheni 10:6 (though it's pretty clear from the Rambam himself, 10:5).


9

The latter is correct. Assuming you ate a proper shiur of both the pastry and the grapes (which creates a requirement for a bracha achrona), you would combine the bracha achrona. However, the correct order would be "al hamichya v'al hakalkalah, v'al haetz v'al pri haetz" (על המחיה ועל הכלכלה, ועל העץ ועל פרי העץ) In general, the correct order is: Al ...


9

The Lubavicher Rabbi Zatzal explains as follows. The Jews were complaining about the lack of grain as Egypt had an abundance of grain. They also complained about figs, grapes and pomegranates, as they were given a promise of arriving in Eretz Yisrael which has those species. However regarding olives they had in the desert as you can see they had olive oil to ...


8

The basic rule is that if the two types to be cross-grafted are similar either in the shape of their leaves or the appearance of their fruit, then it is permitted to crossbreed them. There are some exceptions to this, such as if the taste of the two fruits is very different. (Rambam, Hil. Kilayim 3:4ff) Applying this rule, then, to your cases: Rema (Yoreh ...


8

Another answer (suggested here in the Sefer "Kerem Efraim") is that because the tree was created through a miracle, it was not obligated in Orlah. He brings support from the Radak (Malachim Beis 100:4) who writes that the oil that was miraculously created for the wife of Ovadia did not require Maaser to be separated from it. He explains that for the first ...


7

The question is whether or not it halachically qualifies as a "tree." This has ramifications regarding orlah, as well: In Eretz Yisrael, where even doubtful orlah is forbidden, classifying papaya as a tree fruit would effectively render it prohibited, since most commercially available papaya is from the first three years of the plant's life. Some views ...


7

Great question! This is part of a major machlokes rishonim in maseches beitzah. The Ran in the beginning of the 3rd chapter says that really all melachos are allowed on a Biblical level, but the sages forbade melachos that are generally done for a long time, as harvesting is generally done on an entire field, not just what you need for that meal. ...


6

When I was young, my older brother and I counted a bunch of pomegranates. Some totaled 607, 624, and other numbers in that area. Although none totaled exactly 613, in our series of counting the average came out to 613! Thanks to msh, at the bottom of R. Zivotofsky's article I found that someone has an ongoing experiment regarding just this question and so ...


6

Taamei HaMinhagim 706 says it is done for Kabalistic reasons. In the notes, he mentions in the name of the Imrei Noam that the Gematria of the word "Tapuach" (the Hebrew word for apple) is the same as the Gematria of "S'e Akeida" - so we eat the apple to recall the Akeida (Binding of Isaac).


6

1) The Maharil explains that the apple is connected with "חקל תפוחים קדישין"; when Yaakov came to get the brochos from Yitzchok, he had the smell of an apple orchard upon his clothing. Besides for the Kabbilistic meanings, (according to one opinion) this episode happened on Rosh Hashana (GR”A O.C. 583:8) 2) There are three types of benefit derived from an ...


5

When one picks fruits owned by a Jew in Israel, he is allowed to snack on them (אכילת עראי) until they become designated for maaser (נקבע למעשר), or, if he is planning on selling them, until he finishes his work on the harvest (גמר מלאכה). After that, he cannot eat from them at all until properly tithing them. The most common ways of designating for maaser ...


5

Looks like it's a Haeitz. Sources: brochos.com which appears to be from the CRC.


5

Rabbi Ribiat discusses this in his sefer (The 39 Melochos), starting on page 333 (vol. 2). There are some fruits that are biblically forbidden, some that are rabbinically forbidden, and some that are allowed to be squeezed for juice. The biblically forbidden fruits are grapes and olives, because they are "distinguished especially for their juice." ...


4

See Ari Zivotofsky, "What’s the Truth about... Pomegranate Seeds?" for a general discussion about the claim that the fruits have 613 seeds each; his final footnote discusses the מציאות (facts on the ground).


4

What I'd heard about the baby-cut carrots was a wheat-based enzyme used to keep them nice and bright orange (not a coloring per se), which posed a problem for Passover, but not the rest of the year. There are the problems with fruit grown in the first 3/4 years, as well as all sorts of special rules for produce grown in Israel. Also, there's some ...


4

Fruits from a tree are forbidden to eat for the first three years. This is called Orlah. And, although I can't find a link now, the OU requires baby carrots have a hechsher, since the manufacturers use a color lock to keep the nice orange color. The color lock is an edible spray that is sprayed on the carrot before it is put in the bags.


4

There is specific symbolism in the apple. It also can't be discounted that apples are harvested around Rosh Hashana time so they are a readily available and relatively inexpensive fruit at that time.


4

After CYLORing this, the answer I got is: If the tree is planted exclusively for beauty - there is no problem to enjoy from the fruits during first 3 years, and even to eat them. If the tree is planted also for eating the fruits - it is forbidden to enjoy from the fruits, even from observing (להתבונן) their beauty. However, there is no problem just to look ...


4

See this link to chabad who explains this well. http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/1109802/jewish/Why-Eat-Carob-on-Tu-BShevat.htm There are more reasons,but have to find them.


4

As already stated, this site does not replace a Rabbi. But here are some sources. The Mishan in Mas. Orla (3:10) says: ספק העורלה--בארץ ישראל אסור, ובסוריה מותר; ובחוצה לארץ יורד ולוקח, ובלבד שלא יראנו לוקט. If in doubt, then fruit that could be Orla are forbidden in Eretz Yisrael, but permitted in the Diaspora. That's also have the Shulchan Aruch ...


4

It is only prohibited to cut down trees for no purpose, but what "purpose" includes is hard to define. Rambam Laws of Kings 6:9 deals with your case directly, however: כל אילן סרק מותר לקוץ אותו ואפילו אינו צריך לו. וכן אילן מאכל שהזקין ואינו עושה אלא דבר מועט שאינו ראוי לטרוח בו. מותר לקוץ אותו. It is permissible to cut down any non-fruit bearing ...


4

Shulchan Aruch O.C. 212:1 כל שהוא עיקר ועמו טפילה (פירוש דבר בלתי נחשב) מברך על העיקר ופוטר את הטפילה בין מברכה שלפניה בין מברכה שלאחריה Anything which is primary and has a secondary with it, make the blessing on the primary and exempt the secondary, both in the blessing before and after. This applies to a food no matter how "special" it is, as ...


4

In a discussion on the meaning of seeing the fruit in a dream, the gemara in Berachot4 explains that “seeing small ones portends business being as fruitful as a pomegranate, while seeing large ones means that business will multiply like pomegranates. If, in the dream, the pomegranates are split open, if the dreamer is a scholar he may hope to ...


4

You asked: Have there been any (scientific) studies that prove the benefits of Orlah? Well, as you will see from the answer to your second question, it's not about benefits. You can see from articles like this one that most fruit trees don't bear (real) fruit for the first 3 - 4 years. You then asked: What is the reasoning behind Orlah ...


4

For what it's worth, the CRC's kashrut app lists vanilla beans as kosher without certification. @msh210 says Twitter CRC Plain vanilla beans without any added kosher sensitive ingredients are fine even without certification


3

The honey has been around at least since the times of the Ge'onim; see Otzar HaGe'onim to Rosh HaShanah 32b (p. 53). Footnote ח (ad loc.) suggests that the Agudah had a version of a responsum from the Geonim which explicitly mentioned the custom of apples and honey. Either way, the custom definitely dates back at least to the days of the Agudah, who died in ...


3

Per Rabbi Aaron Tendler as long as you have no intention of using any juice that may squeeze out in the process of cutting, it is allowed.


3

In most Halachic cases, we say that Mitzvoth are violated only if there is a Ma'aseh - an action. However, this article asks the very question you ask, with regard to aesthetic trees, but it does not give an answer (because the "tree" in his case was not a Halachic one). In fact, he implies both that the prohibition is strictly on eating the fruit, and that ...


3

See on the Seforim blog: There are those who claim the custom to celebrate Tu-beshevat as a holiday is based upon the book Hemdat Yamim. This book, according to many, was either written by Nathan of Gaza (Shabbati Zvi's "prophet") or one of follower of Shabbati Zvi. (This is contrary to the assertion in the Philogos that Nathan is not author, a ...


3

Sefer Chemdas Yomim from Rabbi Binyomin HaLevi in Tzefas brings down the Seder in the following links http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=49705&st=&pgnum=288 http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=49705&st=&pgnum=289 http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=49705&st=&pgnum=290



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