Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

15

The Beit Yosef in OC 685 quotes Tosfot who says that Parashiyot Zachor and Parah are Biblical requirements. However, our versions of Tosfot do not have anywhere that Parah is Biblical. The Mishna Berura OC 685 sk 15 writes that most Achronim agree that Parah is not a Biblical requirement. So we really don't know what source Tosfot had in mind (assuming the ...


13

You are right. There is a Shita of the Meiri Bais HaBechira in Megila that says that on Parshas Shekalim you should only take out one Sefer Torah. I imagine that the reason the Shulchan Aruch mentions that we use two Sefer Torahs is because of Lo Pelug.


11

Sefer HaToda'ah (The Book of Our Heritage) says that taking out multiple scrolls would seem unnecessary when the second portion is in close proximity to the first. Never-the-less, he says that the custom is to take out multiple Torahs.


8

Rav Moshe Feinstein writes that all ethnic pronunciations of Hebrew are equally acceptable, even for chalitza which requires the reading of specific Hebrew verses. I'd assume the same would apply here, according to him.


8

The printed version of Tur (end of Orach Chaim 688) says that in that case the parshiyos would not have to be read again, and Beis Yosef there agrees. However, Darchei Moshe and Bach there argue that this version is incorrect, and that indeed they would have to be reread in (or, for Shekalim, before) Adar Sheni.


8

In the terminology used in the Mishnah, the Biblical shekel is called a sela, and the former half-shekel is called a shekel. (Examples are legion - see, for example, Shekalim 1:6: הנותן סלע ונוטל שקל - one who gives a sela and asks for a shekel as change.) So it's quite correct to say that we will give a shekel.


7

First of all, it should be noted that there is a custom to say "Av Harachamim" on the four Parshios-Shabbosos as well. The custom not to say it is in the Darkei Moshe in the name of the Maharail (Siman 685), and seems to be the custom of the Magen Avraham and R. Yaakov Lorberbaum of Lissa (in his Siddur, Derech Hachayim). However, the Eliyah Rabba (685:18) ...


7

Yes, there are many who still do (though unfortunately a minority today). To name a few, Fifth Avenue Synagogue says the Musaf piyutim as does OZ on West Side (or at least they did last time I was there for Parshas Shkalim about 9 years ago), one or more of the Young Israels in the NY area do (I forgot which one but I know that at least one does it). In ...


6

Perhaps your Rav based it on Minhagei Komarna. Minhagei Komarna - 235 says that the Minhag Komarna was to have 3 Kugels every Shabbos. When 2 Sefer Torahs were read they had 4 Kugels. When 3 Sefer Torahs were read they had 5 Kugels. On the notes at the bottom it says that this is based on the Be'er Hataiv 419 quoting the Sheyarai Knesses Hagdola and Sefer ...


5

Per the Mishna Berura "Know that some say that the word זכר should be pronounced as "Zaicher" with a "Tzairai" and some say that it should be pronounced "Zecher" with a "Segol." Therefore, it is correct to read it twice. The Mishnah Berurah does not cite a source for the two opinions, however some have suggested that the source is the following letter by ...


5

Per Halichos Shlomo Perek 18 Note 3 (Rabbi Shlomo Zalman Auerbach) you are Yotzei, however the Moadim UZmanim Chelek 2 Siman 165 & 167 (Rabbi Moshe Sternbach) holds you are not Yotzei.


5

As others have answered, technically the establishment of the calendar is a prerequisite for observing the Jewish holidays. This commandment is in fact the first mitzva given to the Jewish people as a nation. (The few mitzvot recorded in Bereishit were given to individuals before we became a nation.) The Seforno explains that setting the Jewish calendar ...


5

The Rama to Orach Chaim, 669:1 says to use one Sefer Torah for the first and third readings, and the other Sefer Torah for the second reading. במקום שאין להם רק שני ספרי תורה, קורין בראשונה "וזאת הברכה", ובשנייה "בראשית", וחוזרים ולוקחים הראשונה לעניינו של יום; וכן עושין כל מקום דבעינן שלושה ספרי תורה, ואין להם רק שתיים


4

The Ibn Ezra (ad loc.) writes that without the commandment to set the months, we would observe the holidays by season (e.g. shamor es chodesh ha'aviv, v'chag hakatzir bikkurei ma'asecha, etc.). However, setting the halachic calendar is an intrinsic part of the holidays, as mentioned by DoubleAA, so the commandment of "hachodesh hazeh" is appropriately placed ...


4

Sefer Shaarei Yemei HaPurim - page 32 mentions this in the name of the Steipler Zatzal.


4

A comprehensive article about this was written by the late Rav Mordechai Breuer, published in Megadim 10, Shvat 5750. (link: http://www.herzog.ac.il/tvunot/fulltext/mega10_broyer.pdf) He discusses the "Zeicher" issue, as well as "V'laharog" and "Lifneihem" in the Megillah (discussed in Rav Moshe's teshuvah). He traces the history of the variant ...


4

Chinuch 603 says women are not obligated in the active biblical mitzva of remembering what Amalek did, and in 605 says that the details of the "don't forget" mitzva were covered in 603, which Minchas Chinuch (in 603) says "seems a little" to imply that they're exempt from that one, too. However, MC himself (in 603) seems to decide that they are obligated in ...


4

The Rivevos Ephraim chelek 5:584:3 writes that, since if one misses one word of krias megila they are not yotzei (Mishna Brurah 690:5), accordingly it seems that certainly by parshas zachor which is a Torah obligation if one misses one word he is not yotzei: like the Sefer Mikraei Kodesh siman 7 writes, it isn't any lower than megillah. Therefore one should ...


3

I think this might be a daas yachid, but i remember hearing in shiur that the Chofetz Chaim told his sister(s?) that they need not go to shul to hear it, since they were patur. this because they were not chayiv in "timche et zecher Amalek", which is the end goal of remembering.


3

An interesting example is the Yerushalmi shuls in Israel, who follow the customs of Tamidei HaGra. (I think the Tukachinsky luach mentions this custom.) They don't say Yotzrot or Krovot during the brachot of Shma or Shmone Esrei, but after Shacharit (and before taking out the Torah) they say the piyyutim.


3

Seems the Yekkis have http://www.data-genie.com/ashkenaz/home.php?n=Main.Minhogim


3

All the shules under Rav Teitz in Elizabeth, New Jersey have said all Yotzros for over seventy years


3

The Chazon Ish and/or Steipler Rav suggests that the obligation may stem from an interpretation of Vayikra 15:31 as a general instruction to the leadership to warn the nation about the rules of tum'a, which we deliberately accomplish once yearly by the public reading of Para.


3

The entire point of reading Parashat Shekalim is to "announce" that Adar/Nissan are on the way, and as a reminder of the באחד באדר, משמעין על השקלים. Taking out 2 Sifrei Torah forces people to take note. Those who aren't following inside a Chumash would hardly notice anything amiss if one simply rolled a few columns and read a different Maftir and Haftara. ...


3

The Kli Yekar explains that Nissan is the month when the sun is in the constellation Aries, a sheep. We know the Egyptians worshiped sheep (Genesis 46:34 and Exodus 8:22). By slaughtering a sheep in the month of the sheep, God was showing the Egyptians his power over their gods. This connection also helps us understand how counting Nissan (the month of the ...


3

Megila 30a - 9 lines from the bottom has a dispute as to what is the third Shabbos. The Tanna Kama says the Shabbos immediately after Purim, and Rabbi Chama B'Rab Chanina says it is the Shabbos that is closer to Nissan. The Gemara says there is no dispute, it depends when Rosh Chodesh Nisaan occurs. If it occurs on Shabbos then Parshas Para will be read on ...


2

Those that omit Av Harachamim do so because the Four Parshios are to some extent celebratory, in that they usher in and remind us about the oncoming festival of Pesach. The poskim failed to make this explicit because they mistakenly presume that the reader would realize this on his or her own. Of course, my assertion is, by its very nature, difficult to ...


2

Mishna Berura 685:18 actually brings a dispute as to whether we say Av HaRachamim during the weeks of the 4 Parshios. Minhag Chabad is to say on Parshas Zachor and on Parshas Para מפורש בלוח 'היום-יום' לש"פ זכור ופרה שאומרים 'אב הרחמים', however do not say it on Parshas Shekalim or HaChodesh since we are either Bentching Rosh Chodesh or it is Rosh Chodesh. ...


2

In response to #1 - I have never seen a Shul that gives only 5 Aliyos from the first Torah, and I would be surprised to hear that there is a Shul that does that. In response to #2 - My Shul always gives an extra Aliya, and this past week they called up 7 in the first Torah, 1 for the second Torah, and 1 for Parshas HaChodesh. In summation - The only Sefer ...


2

Many years ago I heard that the basis for Parshas Parah being biblical is from this verse: זְכֹר אַל־תִּשְׁכַּח אֵת אֲשֶׁר־הִקְצַפְתָּ אֶת־יְהוָֹה אֱלֹהֶיךָ בַּמִּדְבָּר. Remember, don't forget how you angered your Lord in the desert. The Torah then goes on to talk about the sin of the golden calf. Now Rashi tells us that the Parah Adumah, the red heifer was to atone ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible