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2

No, you don't need to. Furthermore, according to some poskim, you could even listen to the song in the shower. See this Q/A set by dinonline.org: The Question: Is one allowed to listen to Jewish music while showering in the bathroom? Answer: Yes, I don’t see any problem in this. The music does not have the halachah of spoken pesukim, and ...


1

The food in your first link, for which a b'racha isn't said, is food that was stolen. I don't think we can generalize from that to all forbidden foods. The Rambam says that any food that is asur does not get a b'racha either before or after. However, the Shulcan Aruch says that there is at least one case where you do say b'rachot afterwards. This answer ...


6

The Mishna Berurah (196:4) says that if someone steals wheat, grinds it and bakes it, it is actually a Machlokes on whether he could say a Bracha on it. Nonetheless, from the Mishna Berurah it's clear that the Machlokes applies because in this particular case, the thief effected a change (שינוי) through which he acquires the item. However in a "standard" ...


4

No -- a bracha should not be made on stolen food. The gemara in Sanhedrin 6b paskens that if someone would steal wheat, grind it, and bake bread out of it, a bracha still would not be made on that bread. The Rambam (Hilchot Brachot 1:19) brings this as the halacha -- any food that is asur does not get a bracha either before or after. (Credit to this ...


2

According to DinOnline.org one may make sushi on Shabbos, however the rice should not be very hot.


0

In response to why people are lax with the issur chodosh nowadays, R. J. Waxman suggests 4 potential halachik arguments. Unfortunately, none of these reasons withstand real scrutiny: The Rama cited is quoting a Rosh who explicitly requires investigating whether there is indeed a double uncertainty. If it can be reasonably determined that the grain is at ...


7

In the first case you have (where it's an appropriate b'racha) the רמ״א (in 209:1) is quite clear that you're okay: וכל שכן אם היה בידו יין וסבור שהוא מים ופתח אדעתא לומר שהכל ונזכר ובירך בורא פרי הגפן שיוצא שהרי אף אם סיים שהכל יצא (טור): Surely if he had wine in his had, and thought it was water, and started with the intention to say Shehakol, but ...


2

Noheg B'am - page 87 in the second column at the bottom in the name of Sefer Mili L'Mordechai mentions this Minhag for Shavuos based on the Targum Sheni in Megilas Esther Chapter 3. Haman told Achashveirosh that in Sivan the Jews go to their synagogues and throw apples. He mentions this Minhag is mentioned by רבי דוד הסבעוני in the name of Rabeinu Maimon the ...


0

It's the ... Shaagas Aryeh, I think? Noda Bihuda maybe? -- who observes that some hosts throw challah across that table rather than pass it. He suggests that the sacrificial meat actually had to be thrown, rather than placed, onto the fire of the mizbeach, so perhaps this connects to this practice. As for apples, my impression was that the rebbe is focused ...


1

This question might be a dupe of what @AvrohomYitzhak linked to. Either way, read this to get a general sense of what's considered "desert". Excerpt: If one is already full, and he is only eating the deserts because he enjoys its taste, he would have to make a new bracha on the item. Ice cream, sherbet, and candy all receive a separate bracha ...


8

According to the CRC: Black, green, white, yellow, oolong, and jasmine tea are all inherently kosher for Pesach, but the issues of decaffeination and flavoring apply to tea in the same way that they apply to coffee. For that reason all decaffeinated tea and all flavored tea (which includes most herbal teas) should only be used on Pesach if they bear an ...



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