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ילקוט יוסף קצוש"ע אורח חיים סימן שכב - דין נולד בשבת ה. מותר לעשות מי - סודה בשבת על - ידי הכלי המיוחד לכך שנקרא "סיפולקוס" או "סודה סטרים", ואין בזה שום חשש לא של עובדין דחול, ולא משום נולד, ולא משום מכה בפטיש. ובלבד שיעשה זאת לצורך השבת. ואם הותיר לאחר השבת אין בכך כלום. [ילקוט יוסף שבת כרך ג' עמוד תי]. Chacham Ovadia allowed this as well.


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Riv'vos Efrayim, volume 2, responsum 115, paragraph 57 (on page 200), in part, in my own, loose translation: It seems that if he did not recite "hagafen" in havdala he fulfills his obligation. However, if he remembers before the drinking of the wine, he must then recite "hagafen". My omitting "shehakol", the correct benediction, on my beer is akin, as ...


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It would seem from the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in סימן נא - כללים בברכה אחרונה that the Bracha is valid only as long as you're not hungry (or thirsty) again. He states that if one is not sure if one is hungry/thirsty again - and significant time has passed and one has not made the after-Bracha - then one should make another Bracha, eat again, and then make ...


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As far as I know, there is no time limit for one bracha covering another food. According to Halachipedia as long as you don't have an interruption of thought (such as changing locations or making a bracha achrona), no new bracha is required. Of course, you should eat some of the first food immediately after making the bracha, but after that, the bracha ...


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I learnt from Habad that one makes the bracha, sips the drink, says LeHayim and completes drinking. This would not work for Kiddush of course because of the need for a shiur (quantity) of wine.


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The Hamodia newspaper had an article related to the Gemoro Nedorim 32. Pri Megadim records two opinions concerning the proper time to recite “l’chaim.” According to one opinion, one should make the brachah, drink some wine and then say “l’chaim,” whereas other opinions maintain that one should recite “l’chaim” before even reciting the brachah ...


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I am going to address what I assume to be the scenario that you are seeing. Often, a "L'chaim" is said in the middle of a meal. Now according to many opinions, liquor would need its own bracha even in the middle of a meal where one said hamotzi; however, it is likely that the person who is making the l'chaim had already had some to drink and had probably ...


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Qitzur Shulhhan 'Arukh, Yalqut Yosef (Orahh Hayim, Siman 206) outlines many parameters for a break or pause (hefseq) between one's berakhah on a food or drink and the tasting of that food or drink. Se'if 10 in particular touches on the utterance of even a single word not related to one's berakhah, another's berakhah or a Devar SheBiqedushah. As such, it ...


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Many Sephardim include L'Chaim as part of kiddush: HOST: Savri meranan v'rbanan v'rabotai. CROWD: L'Chaim!! HOST: Baruch ata Hashem elokenu melech haolem borei pri hagefen. (Yes I know, Ashkenazim say hagafen.) So I'd follow that precedent. A hearty "L'Chaim" all around, followed by the bracha. I suppose you could also make the bracha, take ...


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When two foods with different brachot are mixed together sufficiently that any bite you take would certainly contain both items, only one bracha is said on the food. Furthermore, in almost all cases, mezonot items are considered the ikkar in a food mixture. The only time when this is not the case is when the mezonot is purely to hold the food together. In ...



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