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I noticed you have been waiting long for an answer and I have a theory to offer, with some rabbinic support. Perhaps this is what you are looking for, or it might just set you or another member on a path that might lead to the answer you are looking for. I suspect the rabbis believed that a mushroom is non-nutritive because in Genesis 1:29 God is ...


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Response to the POTENTIAL ISSUES INVOLVED: 1) Amount of food (and time) on which one makes an after-brocho. See here. One is only obligated to make a Bracha Achrona on a food if one eats a Kezayit of food in Kedi Achilat Pras. See the article for definition of the terms but in short Kezayit = 27 to 33 ccs. Kedi Achilat Pras = up to 7.5 minutes. 2) ...


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Rabbi Sh'lomo Zalman Auerbach is cited in Sh'miras Shabas K'hilchasah (1979 edition, chapter 11 footnote 6) as saying that cut tomatoes are not included in the category of "foods commonly preserved by salting" nowadays [meaning: in his days] and therefore can be salted (for use the same day). RSZA adds, SSK says, that he would say the same about radishes, ...


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It's possible that Magen Avraham got this from Kol Bo. See footnote 57 on p. 15 here as well as Kol Bo section 52 here, right column a few lines from the bottom. Kol Bo states that it was customary for people to put saffron in their matzot because it makes people happy. Kol Bo doesn't explain the custom any further nor why specifically saffron. I'm ...


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Yes there is a special reason for Jews not to eat at an idolator's house even if the food is completely Kosher. This however is only binding when the idolator has invited the Jew to his house, or there was an assumed invitation. This is a law in the Talmud as seen here which expounds a passage in Exodus. Here is the relevant discussion starting from a ...


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Note that in the examples below, even if the food is kosher, one is still forbidden to accept food cooked by a non-Jew. Another example is the banquet produced by Achashveros where the food given to the Jews was completely kosher yet it was wrong of them to participate in the way that they did. There is a prohibition of food cooked by a gentile (bishul Akum)...


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As explained in What's the Truth About... Glatt Kosher the term glatt does only mean that the lungs are smooth and would not have to be checked further to make sure that the animal is kosher. BTW a giraffe is kosher as it is a myth that there is a problem because of the long neck. Actually, the long neck makes it easier to slaughter. The term has come to ...


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The first recorded suggestion appears in an early 14th century German manuscript of Sefer Hasidim. One manuscript includes the following: “On manna they would pronounce the benediction ‘[Blessed are You, O Lord, king of the universe] who gives bread from the heaven’” (MS Parma H 3280; Wistinetzki, 1891, para. 1640). The next scholar who addressed this ...



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