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16

Rama on Yoreh De'ah 13:1 says that it is forbidden to eat a fish while it's alive due to it being disgusting. (Baal Teshakzu) Mishna Torah Hilchos Shechita 1:4 says it is permitted to eat live fish.


15

Likely based on "לעולם יקדים אדם דבר הקל ומאחר הכבד" (from רמב״ם הלכות דעות פרק ד‎, q.v.).


15

Chulin 8 / Yoreh Deah 87:3 - Rabbi Akiva holds that the prohibition of eating chicken with milk is Rabinnic (M'Drabanan) - the reason is to avoid confusion as people consider chicken meat. Fish would not be confused as it does not require slaughtering, however chicken does require slaughtering. Once eggs are laid they are completely developed; and they ...


14

To your last point, traditional caviar comes from sturgeon fish, which are not kosher. Eggs from kosher fish, such as whitefish, are kosher, so you can find kosher-certified "caviar" made of such eggs.


13

The Tzitz Eliezer 9:40 discusses swordfish and says they are forbidden. He says that it is quite likely that the "fish with a sword" discussed in the Knesses HaGedola is really a sailfish, which also has a small sword.


11

Famous question. Rabbi Yosef Karo in his commentary Bait Yosef (which would serve as a first draft of sorts of the Shulchan Aruch) writes not to eat fish with milk (Yoreh De'ah 87:3). His Ashkenazic counterpart Rabbi Moshe Isserles famously commented, "rabbi Karo mixed his milk with meat!" (נראה שנתערב לרב בית יוסף בשר בחלב; Darkhei Moshe, ibid), as the ...


11

הגהות אשרי מסכת עבודה זרה פרק ב רשב"ם כתב בשם רבינו שלמה דהיינו דג טהור שקורין בורביט"א ור' יהודה חסיד אמר כל מי שיאכל בורבוטא לא יזכה לאכול לויתן ופעם א' התירו רבינו אפרים ואמרו לו בחלום שהתיר שרצים וחזר בו ואסרו וכל הפוסק מלאכלו ינוחו ברכות על ראשו. Quick translation: "The Rashba"m writes in the name of R' Shlomo that there is a fish called ...


10

There is a Kabbalistic idea that fish (which live in the water, representing עלמא דאתכסיא, the hidden realm) is on a higher spiritual level than meat (which represent עלמא דאתגליא, the visible world). We thus start with eating fish, thereby giving us the power to afterwards extract the "sparks of holiness" from the meat. (Likkutei Torah of R' Shneur Zalman ...


10

Rabbi Hershel Schachter quotes Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik (Divrei HaRav p. 192) as having been shown a swordfish and permitting it, claiming that there aren't any rules that mandate what the scales should look like. He further notes some historical precedent for eating swordfish in Europe (my impression is there is some disagreement about what fish is ...


10

The Midrash Tanchuma (Vayikra 1:7) asks your question: ולמה קריבין קרבן מן העוף ומן הכבשים ומן הצאן ומן העזים ולא מן הדגים, שנאמר, [ו] אם מן העוף עולה קרבנו, אלא בשביל שהם בשר ודם כמו האדם ויוצאין מבטן אמן כמו האדם, מכפרים על האדם. אבל הדגים, ביצים הם ויוצאין מהן וחיין. And why do we offer up sacrifices from birds, sheep and goats but not from fish? ...


8

It seems to me based on these two fairly reliable opinions here and here that the proper barakha for most sushi is mezuznot. Though if you have some of the more interesting varieties of sushi that are lacking the rice and comprise other things it will probably need to corrected accordingly.


8

In Chullin 27b, the Gemara points out that "animals, which were created from earth, are made kosher via two 'signs' [cutting the windpipe and the esophagus]; fish, which were created from the water, don't need anything to make them kosher; birds, which were created from the mud [containing both earth and water - Rashi], are made kosher via one 'sign.'" ...


8

Kosher mammals (cows, sheep, goats, deer, etc.) and birds (pigeons, chickens, etc.) must be killed by kosher slaughter. So if your pet pigeon dies of natural causes, it’s not kosher. (In fact, if you kosher-slaughtered it but then found it had a massive tumor that would have caused it to die soon anyhow of natural causes, it’s still not kosher!) Kosher fish ...


7

See the discussion here. The Magen Avraham shrugs his shoulders as to why this prohibition became carved-in-stone halacha, but once it did, we accept it as such.


7

The Lubavitcher Rebbe writes in Reshimos: "The prohibition of eating Milk and Fish [mentioned] in the Bais Yosef is considered to be a mis-write. Nonetheless, we are careful [not to], therefore we add something (butter). This is an instruction from the Tzemach Tzedek". The editors of Shaarei Halacha Uminhag write that it seems that adding butter to milk ...


7

The source is the Gemara (Shabbos 67A) which says as follows (translation from here): כי האי תנא תני תנא בפרק אמוראי קמיה דר' חייא בר אבין א"ל כולהו אית בהו משום דרכי האמורי לבר מהני מי שיש לו עצם בגרונו מביא מאותו המין ומניח ליה על קדקדו ולימא הכי חד חד נחית בלע בלע נחית חד חד אין בו משום דרכי האמורי לאדרא לימא הכי ננעצתא כמחט ננעלתא כתריס שייא שייא ...


7

A couple of possibilities: I recall hearing once that it was a miracle (neis), but cannot remember where or from whom I heard/saw it. I similarly recall that the waters around the Teivah were not boiling (source and reason), so it is quite possible the fish hung around there. The waters were only boiling on the surface and not in the depths of the sea (no ...


7

If the fish is kosher (i.e. you can identify it as a kosher species in an acceptable way, e.g. you see the scales on the whole fish, or for skinless salmon by the red color of its flesh which is a sign of kashrus), and everything is cold and clean (fish and utensils), then the fish can be eaten l'chatchila. This is based on the Shach in Yoreh Deah 91 (#3), ...


7

There are a number of opinions that state that catch and release is forbidden halachically on account of צער בעלי חיים - causing the animal pain. For example, according to the Rav Menashe Klein, Zt"l - Mishneh Halachot - Choshen Mishpat - Chelek 12, Siman 432, it is asur (forbidden) to fish for sport if the fish will not be used for food, and even if the ...


7

Teeth aren't an issue - unlike with land animals and birds, kosher fish can be predators. (In fact, barracuda is kosher - and you don't get much more toothy than that!) Fish don't need a mesorah to be kosher (unless it's a corner case, such as where it's uncertain whether the scales are detachable from the skin, or where it resembles too closely a ...


7

I have heard that Rabbi Avraham Yosef Shlita has said in a Shiur that it is not Muktze, since this is the way people eat it.


7

The following explanation is in a footnote at torah.org 22 For unknown reasons, Tosfos, Moed Katan 11a (quoted by Reb Akiva Eiger Y.D. 116 and by Kaf ha-Chayim 170:79), advises against drinking water [or soda] after fish. She'arim Metzuyanim B'halachah 33:2 (2) suggests that for this reason whiskey - and not water - is customarily drunk between ...


6

In SHU"T(questions and answers) Siach Yitchok(יור''ד סימן שפ''ז) SHU"T Pikudas Elezer(סימן ס''ז) In reference to scaling the fish while alive he answers NO.He brings a proof from a Pri Megadim in the name of the Chinuch that the reason that Schechting needs a knife with no blemishes is because of Tzar Balay Chaim and since fish do not require Shechting ...


6

It's also worth pointing out that those who follow the opinion of R' Shneur Zalman of Liadi (in his Seder Birchos Hanehenin 1:11, cited in Mishnah Berurah 208:25) should preferably eat sushi, or any other rice dishes, only during a meal of bread, because there are variant views as to whether rice is the orez mentioned in the Gemara, and this would affect the ...


6

Because the question asks, "which sources say yes and which sources say no", I feel like the question warrants a response that includes a few more sources. The most comprehensive discussion of the issue is published by Dr. Ari Zivotofsky in Bar Ilan's journal Bechol Derachecha Daeihu (vol. 19) and its history is summarized in this news article. Rav Hershel ...


6

Yes. Goldfish ars kosher. You can even kill it to eat it if you want. Ritual slaughter is not necessary for fish (Rambam Shechita 1:3). Lists of kosher fish


5

Harav Akiva Eisenberg (formerly a lecturer at Aish and Ohr, now retired,) told me something excellent. Our preparation and the order of the meal at the Shabbos table is a re-enactment of Ma'aseh Bereishis. The order of our preparation and of our meals seems to be inviolate, as if it were set in stone. Who would have a fleishige first course and a main ...


5

There is a mishnah that explicitly permits fish and milk: Hullin [8:1]: כל הבשר אסור לבשל בחלב, חוץ מבשר דגים וחגבים My translation: "One is not permitted to cook [and eat] any meat in milk, except for the meat of fish and [permitted types of] locust" So no, there is no halachic problem with eating fish and milk together, or else the ...


5

To continue Shalom's answer, I would like to bring down the opinion of the Taz that says the Bet Yosef made a misprint and meant to write fish with meat. So wrote the Hida. However, Maran HaRab Obadia Yosef in Yechawe Daat writes "Yesh Lehimana" meaning that is prohibited according to Sephardim. Rab Obadia Yosef brings a Kula from the Kaf HaHaim that butter ...


5

I believe you have the cases reversed. If you can tell that the fish has scales then you do not need the fins because all scaled fish have fins as well and you know the fish is kosher. The converse is not true and if you find a piece of fish which you can identify as having fins you may not eat it until you ascertain it also has scales. (Shulchan Aruch Yoreh ...



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