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11

This is a matter of dispute in the Mishna Oholos 2:2. Rabbi Eliezer says one quarter kav worth of ash does transmit impurity, whilst the Sages say it does not transmit impurity at all. Rambam (Hilchos Tumas Meis 3:9-10) rules like the Sages.


10

The laws of a home fire on Shabbat are discussed in Shulchan Aruch OC 334. In a case where there is a fire which is not even possibly a danger to human life, one may not extinguish it on Shabbat. Moreover, by rabbinic decree one may not remove his possessions from the house, lest he become overwhelmed, forget that it is Shabbat, and come to extinguish the ...


10

A home on fire is a danger to life. You can, halachically, do very nearly anything necessary to preserve human life, including violating all the Shabas or yom tov prohibitions, and thus including calling an emergency number or doing what you can to extinguish the fire. The second it takes to grab your keys or wallet is a second of risk, which would mean you ...


7

The Ramban writes that even though the same word is being used they have two different meanings. In the first posuk it means "burning", and in the second posuk it means "burned up and consumed". And he points out that the Targum Onkelos also translates the words differently - בער (burning) and מתוקד (burned up).


5

R' David Luria says that it means physical fire. However, he points out two conflicting Midrashim. One says that physical fire was created on the first day of creation, and the other says it was created on Motzei Shabbat. He therefore questions this statement of the Pirkei D'Rebbi Eliezer. Were it not for the Ramban authenticating this version of the ...


5

I would assume it means "the same normal fire as known as fire by flesh-and-blood humans today."


5

If the food is already cooked (to the level of Maachal ben Drusai), and the flambé is just adding some flavor, it would not be problematic (Y.D. 113:8)


4

When I was an EMT I lived in a place where there were many Jews in the rescue squad. The local rabbis told us to arrange a rotation which ensured that there was always someone to answer calls but that we didnt have more people than we need. I would say that Jewish firefighters should try not to be on-call on shabbat but if they need to respond to life ...


3

The reason why Moses mouth got burned was to atone for the milk of the non jewish women that touched his tongue. His hand did not get burned because it did not require atonement. I saw this in some book, i think Vedibarta Bam.


3

All utensils in the Mikdash had multiple copies. It's an explicit Mishna in Chagiga - last Mishna (3:8), actually: כל הכלים שהיו במקדש, היו להם שניים ושלישים; אם נטמאו הראשונים, יביאו השניים תחתיהן.‏ So they surely had a few large containers and they could use them all if needed. As to why they covered the coals? As you said, you don't want ...


3

Hinting to a non jew to help you (without telling them explicitly) could do the trick. Before you find someone to remove the battery place a chair underneath ceiling where the smoke alarm is. Although it could be considered dangerous to have a non-functioning smoke alarm over shabbat, it may be a temporary solution before you can replace the battery. If its ...


3

Nitey Gavriel (Hilchos Yom Tov Cheleck Aleph, end of Chapter 20) quotes many poskim permitting "gram m'avir" on Yom Tov; see footnote 42 there.


2

The Rambam (Shevisas Yom Tov 4:1) writes that the reason one may not kindle a new flame on Yom Tov is because one could just as easily do it beforehand. We find a similar idea with various Yom Tov related rabbinic prohibitions, such as cutting hair on chol hamoed, which one may not do because one could just as easily do it beforehand, and allowing people to ...


2

The Torah says "what is consumed by all people" is work that can be done on yomtov. The Biblical prohibition on "burning" is in fact not in force on yomtov (i.e. "no-work" holidays other than Yom Kippur, when not on Saturday), provided it's for the right cause (more below). But creating a new fire is a separate problem of "generating", which is a rabbinic ...


2

See Mishna in tractate Beitza page 33a: "One may not bring forth fire from wood, stones, earth, tiles nor water etc." Shulchan Aruch Harav ch. 502:1 explains the reasoning, since creating fire is considered "Nolad" (creating something new) versus lighting from a pre-existing flame which does not bring forth something new into this world (which is forbidden ...


2

Rashash and Sfas Emes answer the qustion of the Bach and explain that when Rashi says that (as he explained earlier) there was an commandment to put two blocks of wood on the altar in the morning and the afternoon, he meant that in the time of Shimon Hatzadick, there was no need to put any other wood on the altar. This is one of the miracles that continued ...


2

Without addressing your specific examples, the answer is: Yes, you can say a bracha on burning incense, but only once the pillar of smoke rises up from the burnt spices (Shulchan Arukh OC 216:12). You say whatever blessing you would have said on the spices themselves (ibid. :13).


1

Rashi clearly states that this refers to the bonfire after it was set up in the morning - משסדרוהו שחרית. The Mishna at the end of the 4th Perek discusses how many new bonfires were required to be set up each day and the Gemara discusses how they were built. The passage you mention refers to the fact that these bonfires burnt all day - and all that was ...


1

Someone I know, who knows halacha, suggested to me tentatively that a smoke detector is movable (it is a keli shem'lachto l'heter or, at worst, a keli shem'lachto l'isur, still movable under the circumstances) and that one could remove it from the wall (if it's not screwed in, as many are not) and hide it in a room where it will not be heard. He was ...



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