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10

The Talmud (Pesachim 54b) states that only for Tisha bAv must we be stringent for Bein Hashemashot. There is an opinion in Rishonim that only regarding the Bein Hashemashot at the beginning of the day is Tisha bAv unique, but all fasts require being stringent at the end because we have to wait until it is certainly night to uproot the current status ...


10

Only Yom Kippur and Tisha b'Av are 25-hour fasts. The others are minor fasts, from dawn (first light, before sunrise) until nightfall (full dark). The minor fasts are: Fast of Gedaliah (3 Tishrei) 10 Tevet Fast of Esther (13 Adar) Fast of the Firstborn (for those to whom it applies) (14 Nisan) 17 Tamuz You can read more about these fasts at Judaism ...


8

Fast days are not optional. The "minor" means that they start at daybreak rather than the night before (as do tish'a b'av and yom kippur). Note the rules quoted below for when one may skip the fast (because of illness). Yom Kippur is required by the Torah and Ta'anis Esther is connected to Purim not the destruction of the temple. Once the temple will have ...


6

Continue the fast. ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​


6

The Chassam Soffer in Toras Moshe mahadurei kama in his drush for 7th of Adar d.h. kasuv addresses this. In short he says that just like every generation that the Beis Hamikdosh is not rebuilt is as if it was destroyed, so too every year on the tenth of Teives which was the beginning of the destruction, we are judged and a gezeira is put forth if the Beis ...


6

The question of Kiddush on Yom Kippur is discussed first in the Gemara Eiruvin The Shibolei Haleket (312) writes that because one does not normally eat on Yom Kippur, the Sages never required mention of the holiday in kiddush or even bentching. In fact, making Kiddush would be improper because one might see kiddush being made and think that it should be ...


6

A person who eats on Yom Kipour does not make kiddush and have two challah rolls, plus meat and fish just as any other yom tov. The reason being that they should be eating as little as possible - just enough to keep alive & healthy. However, they do say יַעֲלֶה וְיָבֹא if they ate enough bread - as well as רְצֵה if it's also Shabbat. Enough bread: 27 ...


6

Qitzur Shulhhan Arukh (Yalqut Yosef) clearly states in Orahh Hayim 550:23 - מותר לעשן בימי תעניות צבור, זולת בתשעה באב שראוי להמנע מעישון סיגריות, ובפרט בפרהסיא, כדי שלא יסיח דעתו מאבילות היום. ובעת הצורך מותר לעשן גם בתשעה באב כשעושה כן בצינעא, ובפרט לאחר חצות היום. ובשאר צומות, אף הנוהגים לעשן ביום טוב על ידי הדלקה מאש לאש, דחשיב אצלם לענין זה כאוכל ...


6

There are a variety of things that people do on Tisha B'Av. Many people spend most of the morning reading and discussing the Kinnos. It is also permitted and widespread to learn certain bits of Torah that are relevant to Tisha B'Av. These include Eicha, Iyov, the story of the destruction of the Temple which is related in Gittin 56b-58a and Sanhedrin 104, the ...


5

Sh'miras Shabas K'hilchasah 28:77 (my own translation): When the ninth of Av comes out on Sunday, it's permissible to eat and drink more than usual at the third meal on Shabas, even if his intent is to ease the fast, but he should not say that he's eating for that purpose.


5

The following does not answer the historical aspect of the question directly, but it provides background suggesting that (1.) the circumstances during the diaspora seem to have frequently (if not usually) qualified as "times of oppression", not only during the most acute tragedies of Jewish history, and (2.) the fasts under those circumstances would not have ...


5

In Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 566:5, the Mechaber writes that one who is not fasting is not allowed to be a Shalicah Tzibbur. The Mishnah Berurah (Seif Katan 18) writes that if one were to find himself davening for the amud, he should say עננו in Shma Koleinu and say "ביום צום התענית הזה". If there is no one else to daven for the amud, it is better that one ...


5

As explained in אוצר מנהגי חב"ד, the practice in the main Shul in Lubavitch where the Rabbeim davened was not indicative of the official Chabad practice, but rather represented what the crowd chose to do. So whatever the practice was was not indicative of the actual position of the Rabbeim (i.e. what they would do in private). Often the Rabbeim would daven ...


4

The first record of Yom Kippur Kattan is in the Pri Chadash (Rabbi Chizkiya De-Saluha) to Orach Chaim 417. He attributes it as a custom from the Kabbalist known as the Ramak (Rabbi Moshe Cordovero - the generation before the Arizal). The original custom is primarily about fasting, with some additions of Slichos, etc. which developed. Today, due to the ...


4

Nitei Gavriel - Chanuka - 60:6 says that one should not listen to music on a fast day. (sources: Rokeiach, Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 121:1)


4

Tshuvos Vhanhogos 2:506 in the name of Seridai Aish 2:108 says that there are some when converting that fast on the day of immersion. However Tshuvos Vhanhogos says that a convert should only fast up until the immersion, as after that it is a Yom Tov for him and it is inappropriate to fast then. The reason is that similar to a groom who fasts on the day of ...


3

The key to not getting dehydrated while fasting is to thoroughly hydrate in the days leading up to it. If you drink a lot of caffeine (or alcohol) especially, gradually back off from that and replace it with water. I start the day after Rosh Hashana, replacing other drinks with water or fruit juice over the course of the week. In the last 24 hours before ...


3

The Mishna Berura (555:8) rules one should not smoke on any of the 4 [Temple-related (?)] fasts unless one is extremely addicted whereby he can be lenient in private. This leniency was not given to Tisha bAv night or morning.


3

Many communities offer various shiurim and / or films during the afternoon. I don't know if this is available where you live, but in mine, shuls "compete" with each other. During approx. the last decade, The Chofetz Chaim Heritage Foundation has presented 2 excelent videos on Tish'a B'av. Many shuls present one or both of them, and they are always ...


3

The OP asks about attending the siyum and only eating later at a different place and time? The Minchas Yitzchak (vol.9:45) and Rav Elyashav (I heard this from Rav Smith) both say (as do others) that the simchah of the siyum is what releases the fast. Therefore, you may eat later and elsewhere. One idea for this is the Gemara (Shabbos 118) that says when ...


2

O Ch 553 (2) Rema near the end says After Chatzos on Erev Tisha B'Av, the Minhag is to learn only things that may be learned on Tisha B'Av. The source for what can be learnt on 9th Av is mentioned in this question. It is O Ch 554 (1-4). There seems to be no special leniences for 8th Av afternoon. My Rav said (and I saw it here) that Certainly ...


2

As a general idea the Mishna Brurah writes that the idea of fasts is to bring one to do tshuva not to just fast and go on like a regular day,it is like taking the tafel instead of the ikar. If a mother needs to nurse then she should eat what she needs. If one is allowed to eat it means just that but to eat fancy things or sweets that are not necessary does ...


2

I was learning something related in the Sefer Vezos Haberacha (וזאת הברכה) and came across this exact case! He writes (in Perek 13, in the context of discussing cases that are exceptions to general rules of "ordering of brachos") [loose translation by me]: ‏ וכן אדם שבא לאכול סעודה, ורוצה להקדים ולשתות לפני הסעודה, מפני שהוא צמא, רשאי לעשות כך אף ...


2

R Yitzchak Abadi writes (Or Yitzchak 65) that indeed one should not say כי אתה...צרה וצוקה when reciting Aneinu in the fourth to last Bracha of Shmoneh Esrei. If one did accidentally say it he writes that one should not continue with כי אתה שומע...‏ from the end of the regular text, but amend it to ואתה שומע...‏ and not say כי twice.


2

An article (here) notes that the Sheiltos on Purim is almost certainly a later Geonic addition. Accordingly, the earliest reference would be from later Geonim. The author of that article conjectures that it was at that time that the custom developed. We would similarly infer (at least such a rough time estimate) from the Rambam who writes that "these days" ...


2

In Yerushalyaim it is common to find minyanim saying it. Furthermore, it is the official practice of the Mir yeshiva to say Yom Kippur Koton. Although the minhag is not widespread being that it is something that was practiced by exceedingly righteous as its source is in kabbala


2

The Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayim, Siman 568, Halacha 12, writes: כל השרוי בתענית בין שהיה מתענה על צרתו או על חלומו בין שהיה מתענה עם הצבור על צרתם הרי זה לא ינהג עידונין בעצמו ולא יקל ראשו ולא יהיה שמח וטוב לב אלא דואג ואונן כענין שנאמר מה יתאונן אדם חי Anyone involved in fasting, whether he's fasting because of his suffering or because of his ...


2

The Ramma in Orach Chayim siman 581 says it start at amud hashachar and we are not mashlim. The Aruch Hashulchan there and the Mishna Berurah in siman 562 s.k. 10 says that means you don't need to wait till nightfall. But he then brings a Machatzis Hashekel from our siman that says due to the weakening of the generations many people only fast untill mincha ...


1

Consult your rabbi and your doctor as to whether you should be fasting. If you feel weak, sometimes simply taking it easy (or even spending the day in bed) is the right approach. For the Torah-ordered fast day of Yom Kippur, there is less of a violation if one doesn't consume "a serving" of food in "a few minutes." Hence you've likely heard of those who ...


1

Dailyhalacha.com says as follows. The Agudah says it is permitted as saliva not a food that is consumed. Others say it is not even considered food. Chasam Sofer differentiates between the evening and the morning. At night, you should not swallow saliva, as the saliva still has the flavor of the food that one ate at the Seuda HaMafsekes. However by day, he ...



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