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In Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 566:5, the Mechaber writes that one who is not fasting is not allowed to be a Shalicah Tzibbur. The Mishnah Berurah (Seif Katan 18) writes that if one were to find himself davening for the amud, he should say עננו in Shma Koleinu and say "ביום צום התענית הזה". If there is no one else to daven for the amud, it is better that one ...


4

Tshuvos Vhanhogos 2:506 in the name of Seridai Aish 2:108 says that there are some when converting that fast on the day of immersion. However Tshuvos Vhanhogos says that a convert should only fast up until the immersion, as after that it is a Yom Tov for him and it is inappropriate to fast then. The reason is that similar to a groom who fasts on the day of ...


4

Qitzur Shulhhan Arukh (Yalqut Yosef) clearly states in Orahh Hayim 550:23 - מותר לעשן בימי תעניות צבור, זולת בתשעה באב שראוי להמנע מעישון סיגריות, ובפרט בפרהסיא, כדי שלא יסיח דעתו מאבילות היום. ובעת הצורך מותר לעשן גם בתשעה באב כשעושה כן בצינעא, ובפרט לאחר חצות היום. ובשאר צומות, אף הנוהגים לעשן ביום טוב על ידי הדלקה מאש לאש, דחשיב אצלם לענין זה כאוכל ...


4

The following does not answer the historical aspect of the question directly, but it provides background suggesting that (1.) the circumstances during the diaspora seem to have frequently (if not usually) qualified as "times of oppression", not only during the most acute tragedies of Jewish history, and (2.) the fasts under those circumstances would not have ...


4

The Maharsha (Rosh HaShana 18b, s.v. U'mee harago)1, on the premise that Gedalya was in fact righteous, addresses the remaining question of why, if HaShem considers the death of a righteous person to be as calamitous as the burning of the Temple, we only have a fast day to commemorate Gedalya's death and not the death of other righteous people. The ...


3

Bnei Yissaschar - Adar 7:9 mentions it in the name of Medrash Eliyahu - Section beginning Yalkut in the name of Rabbi Chaim Vital. This is also mentioned in the Shlah Hakodosh - Derush L'Parshas Zachor. אסתר גזרה תענית תקנה חטא אכילה. וגם בסעודה שעשתה החרידה לישראל וגרמה לתשובה תקנה חטא סעודת אחשורוש. וענין אכילה ועבודה זרה ענין נחש וסמאל, אכילה ...


3

The Maharal in his commentary to Megillas Esther says that Esther only fasted for 70 hours (as opposed to 3 full days, 72 hours), and she actually broke her fast before going to Achashverosh to prepare herself for meeting the king. This is hinted in the verse "גַּם-אֲנִי וְנַעֲרֹתַי, אָצוּם כֵּן; וּבְכֵן אָבוֹא אֶל-הַמֶּלֶךְ" (Esther 4:17) "we will fast כן ...


3

The statement is made in what appears to be an addendum to the 6th letter printed at the end of Ateres Tzvi (the Zitishover's commentary on the Zohar). He makes two similar statements equating drinking on Purim to fasting for 6 days. He does not source the idea but compares it to the fasting of Mar b'rei d'Ravina (of which I am unfamiliar).


2

As a general idea the Mishna Brurah writes that the idea of fasts is to bring one to do tshuva not to just fast and go on like a regular day,it is like taking the tafel instead of the ikar. If a mother needs to nurse then she should eat what she needs. If one is allowed to eat it means just that but to eat fancy things or sweets that are not necessary does ...


2

Sefer Segulas Yisrael 80:3 is the source you are looking for.


2

The Mishna in Taanis 2:1-2 deduces that the main point of the fast is not abstaining from eating, but rather repenting and praying for repentance. סדר תענייות כיצד: מוציאין את התיבה לרחובה של עיר; ונותנין אפר מקלה על גבי התיבה, ובראש הנשיא, ובראש אב בית דין, וכל אחד ואחד נוטל ונותן בראשו. והזקן שבהם אומר לפניהם דברי כיבושים--אחינו, לא נאמר באנשי ...


2

R. Tzvi Reisman has a long, in-depth discussion on this topic here, and the following are some of the main points which answer the question. 1) The obligation of this fast is unlike other fasts, in that it is only mentioned in a Baraissa of Mesechta Soferim, and not the gemara. Thus the obligation to fast started only as a minhag and so it is treated ...


2

This site says there is no source for the Taanis Dibbur but that it is mentioned by the Mishnah Berurah 571 (1) MB [2] where the Mishnah Berurah says that he saw written in a book that when someone wants to offer a voluntary fast it's better if he accepts a Taanis Dibbur rather than holding himself back from food since he will have no bodily harm from it ...


2

Tzom is the word used most often in Biblical Hebrew to mean "fast" (such as in Isaiah in Esther); the word Taanis doesn't appear until the Book of Ezra, which was later (about two hundred years after Isaiah). Hence, Tzom Gedalya is called Tzom because it is mentioned in Tanakh (Zechariah 8:19), while Taanis Esther uses the more modern term Taanis because it ...


2

The animals may have been involved in sin such as gilui arayot and avodah zara so although they must have been induced in doing sin, and were probabaly surrounded by sin, they too were made to repent. Their owners who helped commit the sins repented and made their animals fast too. BTW: It is interesting that Hashem argues with Yona about having pity on ...


1

Aruch Hashulchan 97:3 says he should wipe it on a garment (where it won't be visible outwardly) or collect it in his hand and toss it to the floor behind him.


1

Assuming there's a good chance that you would have to break your fast, I would be tempted to allow you to eat before nightfall - and then have you fast until Rabbeinu Tam so that - at least according to one opinion - you have fasted the entire fast. However, were I to be a Rabbi, I would be hesitant to actually pasken this way; I wouldn't want people to do ...


1

There are 6 fast days that every Jew must keep - Tzom Gedaliah, Yom Kippur, Asarah B'Teves, Ta'anis Esther, Shivah Asar B'Tammuz and Tishah B'Av. End of story.



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