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7

Shulchan Aruch EH 15:5 states: אשת אביו אסורה לו מן התורה, בין שהיא אשתו מן הנשואין בין מן האירוסין, בין בחיי אביו בין כשמת אביו או גירשה.‏ The wife of one's father is forbidden to him biblically, whether she was his wife from nissu'in or erusin, whether one's father is alive or not or [even if] he divorced her.


7

The Vilna Gaon here answers this problem according to what the gemara teaches in several places (e.g. Pesachim 40b) - "Go! Go!" we say to the Nazir, "Go around! Go around! Do not go close to the vineyard!". And as we know Shimshon was a Nazir, and behold, it says "and they came until the vineyards of Timnas". Therefore Shimshon did not go with them but ...


7

After the Return by Rabbis Mordechai Becher and Moshe Newman, a guidebook for baalei t'shuva, covers this. To summarize the discussion in Chapter 6: You should offer to do (and fund) the shopping to avoid placing an extra burden on them. The best case is that they agree to kasher the kitchen, and he says that some parents are actually willing to do that ...


7

Just a copy/paste from a nice article on the subject found HERE Avigdor Shinan introduces “Eishet Chayil” in the Siddur that he edited and annotated, as follows: This biblical passage has been included in the Siddur since the 17th century (when Kabbalists established other portions of the Friday night liturgy, such as poem Lecha Dodi—jb). Its ...


6

Rabbi Moshe Feinstein writes (OC2:111, "to a certain scholar") that it is entirely permissible to purchase life insurance and it indicates no shortage of faith, even for an exceedingly righteous person. (Faith, he writes, is "I will work hard and I believe that G-d will provide me with enough to pay the premiums.") He writes that is, in fact, davar tov ...


6

The reality is that for many Baalei Teshuva they simply won't have the knowledge to really dynamically adapt to such a situation. Things like this can raise situations that can absorb the greatest Rabbis in discussions about exactly what to allow and what not, and anyone facing this situation for real should discuss the expected situation in advance with ...


6

והא רב בר אחוה דרבי חייא דהוא בר אחתיה דר' חייא Rav, the son of the brother of R' Chiyya, was the son of the sister of R' Chiyya Rashi: דרבי אחא מכפרי נשא לאה והוליד ממנה אייבו מתה ונשא רחל ולה בת מאיש אחר וממנה נולד רבי חייא ונשא אייבו הבת ונולד להן רב ונמצא רב בר אייבו בר אחוה דרבי חייא מאבוה ובר אחתיה מאמיה Rebbi Acha married Leah and ...


5

Ruth 4: 18 - 22 Peretz, Chetzron, Ram, Aminadav, Nachshon, Salmon, Boaz, Oved, Yishai, Dovid. Nachshon was the nasi of Yehudah at the time of the Exodus. Sotah 11b says that Dovid descended from Miriam. However, Calev is not mentioned. Some commentators connect Dovid being called Efrati with Miriam (Efrat) and say that one of her descendants married into ...


4

The sefer תולדות תנאים ואמוראים here says that R. Akiva had a son from a previous marriage before he married Rachel, and that he learned for many years locally after he married her until he felt that he was no longer an עם הארץ and it was time to go and learn from the leading Rabbis of the generation, at which time he asked her permission to leave for twelve ...


4

To sum up what's been said, there are three concerns involved of what people might think when seeing you in a non-kosher restaurant: "If Moshe eats there, it must be kosher." (This is especially a problem with a "kosher-style" restaurant, or one with a very questionable hechsher.) "I know it's prohibited, but if Moshe eats there, it must be one of those ...


4

The Chochmas Adam (Issur v'Heter, 89:7) decries the practice of going to a gravesite and unburdening oneself to the deceased by telling them about one's problems. However, he writes, this is not strictly a violation of consulting with the dead (see Deut. 18:11) since the communication is understood to go only one-way.


4

R' Rachmiel Zelcer in סימן יב of his נר למאה on פורים cites the צפנת פענח on מסכת סופרים: The name of Agag, king of Amalek, was in fact Hamdata. And "Agag" is actually the title for kings of Amalek. So why does the מגילה call Haman an Agagite (instead of Amalekite)? Since Sanherib mixed up all the nations, we can't be certain that any individual is in fact ...


4

Gersonides (Ralbag) is puzzled by this. He offers two answers. The first is that the children were minors, and that they consequently came under the category of Achen's property, with regard to the punishment. We must then say that the verse in Deuteronomy takes apllies only once the child becomes an adult by Jewish Law. This would appear consistent with the ...


4

According to Rashi they were not killed. In his commentary to Joshua 7:24, Rashi writes that they were taken to see in order that they not copy his actions. Verse 25 says "וירגמו אותו" - they stoned him, in singular. "וישרפו אותם", they burned them, in plural, Rashi says refers to the tent and other property. "ויסלקו אותם" - they stoned them in plural, ...


4

A man who was born a kohen passes that to his son (and he to his son, and so on). It doesn't pass through a daughter to a grandson. The only exception is that it (generally) doesn't pass to a son who's the offspring of the kohen and someone forbidden to him (including a gentile woman). As a source and for more info, see http://chabad.org/468267. Hat tip to ...


3

In actuality, he did treat her exceptionally well, but was very careful not to embarrass either of them. Note Rus 2:19 in which Naomi notices that she had been treated exceptionally well. The commentary to 2:17 states that he instructed his workers to "forget" or "drop" unusual amounts of wheat so that she could glean (legally) a large amount and not realize ...


3

Nitei Gavriel Hilchos Aveilos 2 Chapter 15 & 16 discusses this question. From what I see the only time a wedding would get delayed is when the bridegroom or bride are themselves in formal mourning. It would definitely be delayed. In some instances until after the Shiva and in others until after the Sheloshim. Parents and grandparents who are in mourning ...


3

A child born to a Jewish mother is Jewish,1 and one born to a non-Jewish mother is not. This is determined at the time of birth, which is why infant conversions are sometimes done when a woman is in the process of conversion. Changes in the mother's status after the child is born are not relevant. One source for this is Kiddushin 66b (in the mishna at the ...


3

According to Ask the Rabbi from Yeshivas Ohr Somayach: First he reviews the reasons that were mentioned in the question you referred to He (IMHO) seems to take a angle that says that the reason we don't say for the full 12 months even if we know the person was wicked is not to embarrass the deceased. Then he concludes: So, unless the parent ...


3

Haman is called an Agagite to link him directly to the failure of Saul to kill Agag before he could reproduce. Mordechai and Saul were both of the tribe of Benjamin and it is literately significant that one Benjaminite avenges the failure of another. That is why it is specified that he is an Agagite and not a mere Amalekite. I have also heard that Mordechai ...


3

Before Rosh Hashanah, and especially on the day before the holiday begins, it is a long-standing custom to visit gravesites and to exhort the tzadikim there to intercede for us on the day of judgement. However, we do not direct our prayers toward the dead who rest there; rather, we implore G-d to have mercy on us for their sake. (Kitzur Shulchan ...


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See the commentary of the Ibn Ezra on Esther 8:1 (page 30 in the linked document) where he says that Mordechai was Esther's uncle.


3

Cousins can share the same names, and very often do. The relationship of a cousin, is that they share a grandparent, and in cases where the grandparent dies, future children are often named after them. I would even venture to suggest that cousins names are more likely to be the same than most other relatives. With regards to how close is too close, for ...


3

A main part of the answer seems to be in some of the above comments. In brief, the easiest solution is to use cold already prepeared foods and paper / plastic goods. By "cold" I refer to either items already cooked that don't need to be reheated (e.g. - take out), or items that don't have to be heated in the first place (bread, cereal, cheese, etc.) If you ...


2

A convert should not say Yizkor for his\her non-Jewish parents, for the simple reason that the text of Yizkor is specific to Jews (as we ask God to bind the soul of the deceased with those of their ancestors Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Sarah, Rebecca, Rachel and Leah.) However, a convert may say a personal prayer in remembrance of his\her parents in place of the ...


2

The Rashba explains: With regards to the issue of Yaakov marrying two sisters, you should know that the Torah rests on three pillars - time, place and items. Time - not on all days is doing work forbidden like Shabbos and Yom Tov, or is eating chametz forbidden like Pesach, or are obligated in the having of a succah and a lulav like Succos. Place - not ...


2

http://www.shtaygen.co.il/?CategoryID=817&ArticleID=7936 InParshas Lech Lecha - Braishis 15:15 it says that when Avraham will pass away ואתה תבוא אל אבותיך בשלום. Rashi explains that even though Terach was an idol worshipper it says come to your parent, since Terach repented prior to his death. The Marhasha was asked the following question when he was ...


2

The Rambam writes: This reckoning is not calculated [only] on the basis of the number of merits and sins, but also [takes into account] their magnitude. There are some merits which outweigh many sins as implied by [I Kings 14:13]: "Because in him, there was found a good quality." In contrast, a sin may outweigh many merits as [Ecclesiastes 9:18] states: ...


2

Your question seems to concern balancing considerations of mar'is ayin and shalom bayis (family harmony). One source you might consider is the ruling of R' Moshe Feinstein (Igros Moshe OC 2:40) regarding entering a non-kosher restaurant: And therefore, there is even reason to prohibit entering to eat items that are known to definitely be kosher (e.g. ...


2

A source for using the name of the mother is the gemara Shabbos 66b: Abayei said: Mother told me that all incantations should contain the name of the mother.



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