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13

In the Tzavaos of Rabbi Yehuda HaChasid #25 seen here he says two brothers should not marry two sisters. See note #37 (#32 in the linked edition) from Rabbi Reuven Margolis quoting the Noda Biyehuda Even HaEzer 79 who brings cases in the gemara where we see this was not something they adhered to. EDIT: To clarify the issue and for those who don't know, ...


6

The basic rule is there is no allowance to speak lashon hara to relatives. See for instance Hilchos Lashon Hara Klal 8, Siff 10 on page 215. In fact the Chafetz Chaim there advises against telling your wife all the ways you were mistreated during the day because it will cause her to lose respect for you too! The Chafetz Chaim in Hilchos Lashon Hara Klal 6, ...


6

Yes they are allowed to marry. The problems are discussed here. I personally know of such couples (and also brother-sister, sister-brother cross-over) among the most ultra-orthodox chasidim.


5

R' Moshe Feinstein addresses your question (Igros Moshe YD I §54). He says that they are not believed under the category of eid echad ne'eman b'issurin (עד אחד נאמן באיסורין - "a single witness is believed to relate whether something is a forbidden item")1 since they don't keep kosher. However, he also says that if you know from extensive experience that a ...


5

You may keep it for yourself. The Braita states (for example, here) that a lost item which is unobtainable to the owner - such as a sunken treasure - is automatically subject to ye'ush (see below) and is free to take. There is no legal obligation to return it to its former owner. Ye'ush means the owner gave up hope of ever getting it back and thereby loses ...


3

The issue is discussed in Yevamot and yes it is legal and that is not disputed. What is mentioned is where it leaves the state of a widow if one brother dies childless, and what happens if there is a younger 3rd brother. If there are just 2 brothers then Yibum is impossible and because it is, then there is no need for Chalitzah either, the woman is free to ...


2

Nice timing, Terri! A couple of weeks ago I was given a pile of books, and in it was one called Finding Our Fathers: A Guidebook to Jewish Genealogy by Dan Rottenberg. It has step by step instructions for finding out information about your Jewish relatives. It also has a list of over 2000 Jewish names in the back, with information about what families are ...


2

This is only a partial answer. I have heard from Rabbi Moshe Sternbuch, (formerly in South Africa where he was my family's Rav, now Raavad of the Edah Hachareidis, Jerusalem), that a Baal teshuva does NOT wear tefilin on Chol Hamoed as this is lechumrah. One only wears tefilin, if one has an existing family tradition to do so.


1

Here are three books on Jewish marriage and respect between spouses which I would recommend, out of many I read Made in Heaven: A Jewish Wedding Guide by R Aryeh Kaplan -- in my view the best guide to a Jewish wedding and through this to building the foundations of a strong Jewish couple The Jewish Way in Love & Marriage by R Maurice Lamm which also ...


1

Unless of course you are in Israel, as there are major Sephardi big wigs who say something entirely different. "Rav Avraham Yosef, the Chief Rabbi of Cholon and son of Rav Ovadiah Yosef, is now following in his father’s footsteps and promoting the psakim (customs and laws) of the Sefardim, according to the Beit Yosef, as the overruling authority in Eretz ...


1

The Shevus Yaakov chelek 1:4(mentioned in user262055's answer) deals with a pair of Siamese twins who are joined at the heads which makes them appear as though they have one wide head. He writes that they would both require to wear teffilin on both heads. They would both receive a portion of yerusha not just a joined one. They would also not be allowed to ...


1

There are a number of halachic issues, for example, the Gemarah in Menachot (page 37) discusses conjoined twins with regard to tefillin, and Piskei Teshuvot 225:20 in name of Sh”t Shevut Yacov 1:4 writes that one may make the blessing of "Meshaneh HaBriyot" on Siamese twins. The most famous/talked about is the ethical/halachic dilemma of separating twins ...


1

Here is my favorite collection of ideas to share at a chuppah (told over by Rabbi Shlomo Carlebach).


1

The mishnah in Sanhedrin (top of 46b) states that even the family of someone killed by Beis Din, for whom shiva is FORBIDDEN, may engage in anninus, since that is entirely internal. Halacha specifically recognizes internal emotion as a separate sphere or mourning and chooses not to regulate it in this case. It would seem that anninus would be entirely ...



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