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16

Like many things in life, this will obviously depend on the specific situation. For example, if the relevant people understand your lifestyle and why you would be sensitive to this issue before it came up would be a very different question than if they are militantly opposed to your zealous bigotry. I had a close relative marry a non-Jew, and I actually ...


11

Among those Rabbis that I know, if/when they are approached by someone who wasn't raised as a Jew but has a Jewish maternal grandparent, they welcome them with open arms as Jews, albeit Jews who have been estranged from their own religion. I have known this to have occurred on multiple occasions (although I was never personally involved in any). It may be ...


10

No, the rabbi wouldn't find it strange. & Yes, he would accepted you at the spot as 100% jewish. And I can tell you from my own personal experience they would be even very happy!


9

Tosfos in Bava Basra 141a writes: בת היה לו ובכל שמה. וא"ת ולמה לא השיאה ליצחק למ"ד בפרק ארבע מיתות (סנהדרין דף נח:) דבן נח מותר באחותו וי"ל דשמא קטנה היתה ולא רצה עדיין להשיאה ליצחק אי נמי מהגר היתה לו ולא משרה ולכך לא רצה להשיאה ליצחק Tosfos asks, if Avraham Avinu had a daughter why didn't Yitzchak marry her, according to the opinion that a ben ...


8

After the Return by Rabbis Mordechai Becher and Moshe Newman, a guidebook for baalei t'shuva, covers this. To summarize the discussion in Chapter 6: You should offer to do (and fund) the shopping to avoid placing an extra burden on them. The best case is that they agree to kasher the kitchen, and he says that some parents are actually willing to do that ...


7

The reality is that for many Baalei Teshuva they simply won't have the knowledge to really dynamically adapt to such a situation. Things like this can raise situations that can absorb the greatest Rabbis in discussions about exactly what to allow and what not, and anyone facing this situation for real should discuss the expected situation in advance with ...


7

Just a copy/paste from a nice article on the subject found HERE Avigdor Shinan introduces “Eishet Chayil” in the Siddur that he edited and annotated, as follows: This biblical passage has been included in the Siddur since the 17th century (when Kabbalists established other portions of the Friday night liturgy, such as poem Lecha Dodi—jb). Its ...


6

The basic rule is there is no allowance to speak lashon hara to relatives. See for instance Hilchos Lashon Hara Klal 8, Siff 10 on page 215. In fact the Chafetz Chaim there advises against telling your wife all the ways you were mistreated during the day because it will cause her to lose respect for you too! The Chafetz Chaim in Hilchos Lashon Hara Klal 6, ...


6

I was in a similar situation a decade ago. The Rabbi of the orthodox shul looked into my background and accepted me and made me feel welcome. You never know where such things lead and I'm now on the shul's board and am an assistant gabbai. You're halachically Jewish and will be recognised as such. What you do with that is up to you.


6

To quote Rashi: the nakedness of your father: This [refers to] your father’s wife. [But how do we know this?] Perhaps it is only to be interpreted literally [as an admonition against relations with one’s father, in addition to the general admonition against pederasty]. [The answer is:] It says here, “The nakedness of your father,” and it says further, ...


6

והא רב בר אחוה דרבי חייא דהוא בר אחתיה דר' חייא Rav, the son of the brother of R' Chiyya, was the son of the sister of R' Chiyya Rashi: דרבי אחא מכפרי נשא לאה והוליד ממנה אייבו מתה ונשא רחל ולה בת מאיש אחר וממנה נולד רבי חייא ונשא אייבו הבת ונולד להן רב ונמצא רב בר אייבו בר אחוה דרבי חייא מאבוה ובר אחתיה מאמיה Rebbi Acha married Leah and ...


5

Ruth 4: 18 - 22 Peretz, Chetzron, Ram, Aminadav, Nachshon, Salmon, Boaz, Oved, Yishai, Dovid. Nachshon was the nasi of Yehudah at the time of the Exodus. Sotah 11b says that Dovid descended from Miriam. However, Calev is not mentioned. Some commentators connect Dovid being called Efrati with Miriam (Efrat) and say that one of her descendants married into ...


4

A main part of the answer seems to be in some of the above comments. In brief, the easiest solution is to use cold already prepeared foods and paper / plastic goods. By "cold" I refer to either items already cooked that don't need to be reheated (e.g. - take out), or items that don't have to be heated in the first place (bread, cereal, cheese, etc.) If you ...


4

Cousins can share the same names, and very often do. The relationship of a cousin, is that they share a grandparent, and in cases where the grandparent dies, future children are often named after them. I would even venture to suggest that cousins names are more likely to be the same than most other relatives. With regards to how close is too close, for ...


4

A man who was born a kohen passes that to his son (and he to his son, and so on). It doesn't pass through a daughter to a grandson. The only exception is that it (generally) doesn't pass to a son who's the offspring of the kohen and someone forbidden to him (including a gentile woman). As a source and for more info, see http://chabad.org/468267. Hat tip to ...


4

Recommendation: just send your regrets that you will not be able to attend. Explaining your issue will only cause hurt feelings, for no good reason. More generally, I see only a few options. Decline while challenging them directly and definitely hurt their feelings. Or decline without challenging them and let them feel you're trying to be respectful about ...


3

R' Moshe Feinstein addresses your question (Igros Moshe YD I §54). He says that they are not believed under the category of eid echad ne'eman b'issurin (עד אחד נאמן באיסורין - "a single witness is believed to relate whether something is a forbidden item")1 since they don't keep kosher. However, he also says that if you know from extensive experience that a ...


3

A talmid of R' Noach Weinberg told me that R' Noach used to often say a pshat in that. The Torah is saying, even if you are going to stoop to homosexuality, but not your father. And the lesson is, just because you have stooped pretty low, don't throw everything away.


3

In actuality, he did treat her exceptionally well, but was very careful not to embarrass either of them. Note Rus 2:19 in which Naomi notices that she had been treated exceptionally well. The commentary to 2:17 states that he instructed his workers to "forget" or "drop" unusual amounts of wheat so that she could glean (legally) a large amount and not realize ...


2

I've seen the Gabbai Sheni say it instead, to avoid the distasteful move of calling out "God bless me!"


2

This is only a partial answer. I have heard from Rabbi Moshe Sternbuch, (formerly in South Africa where he was my family's Rav, now Raavad of the Edah Hachareidis, Jerusalem), that a Baal teshuva does NOT wear tefilin on Chol Hamoed as this is lechumrah. One only wears tefilin, if one has an existing family tradition to do so.


2

A convert should not say Yizkor for his\her non-Jewish parents, for the simple reason that the text of Yizkor is specific to Jews (as we ask God to bind the soul of the deceased with those of their ancestors Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Sarah, Rebecca, Rachel and Leah.) However, a convert may say a personal prayer in remembrance of his\her parents in place of the ...


2

Nice timing, Terri! A couple of weeks ago I was given a pile of books, and in it was one called Finding Our Fathers: A Guidebook to Jewish Genealogy by Dan Rottenberg. It has step by step instructions for finding out information about your Jewish relatives. It also has a list of over 2000 Jewish names in the back, with information about what families are ...


2

No. A "vegetarian, kosher-style meal" need not be kosher; even a vegan one need not be kosher. That said, there are some foods you can eat in their house, such as (usually) whole raw fruits. If this question is relevant to you practically, then consult your rabbi.


2

This question was raised by the Assia journal conjunction with artificial fertilization. It is a problem to take sperm from another Jew because the child could marry his brother. It may be permitted to take sperm of a non-Jew in this case because they are not considered to be brothers. , שהטעם "עיקרי לאיסור הזרעה מיהודי זר לאשת-איש - "שמא ישא אחותו ...


2

Had there been extra pesukim showing how long Aminadav lived and when Aharon took Elisheva as a wife and when Elazar married bas Putiel, then we could have made a drasha like that. However, in this case, all we know is that Aharon married some time during the galus mitzrayim and that Pinchas was born some (unknown) time before yetzias Mitzraim and that he ...


1

Conjecture: The Hebrew word "damim" means both blood and money. Perhaps, because of the use of the same word for distinct definitions, this adage arose. In a sense, it is saying, separate the "blood" or "damim" of your own family which is your own flesh and blood from the other definition of "damim" - money.


1

Partial answer: There is no Shabbos problem of sending it even if it is already Shabbos where the recipient is (see last paragraph here).


1

The mishnah in Sanhedrin (top of 46b) states that even the family of someone killed by Beis Din, for whom shiva is FORBIDDEN, may engage in anninus, since that is entirely internal. Halacha specifically recognizes internal emotion as a separate sphere or mourning and chooses not to regulate it in this case. It would seem that anninus would be entirely ...


1

Unless of course you are in Israel, as there are major Sephardi big wigs who say something entirely different. "Rav Avraham Yosef, the Chief Rabbi of Cholon and son of Rav Ovadiah Yosef, is now following in his father’s footsteps and promoting the psakim (customs and laws) of the Sefardim, according to the Beit Yosef, as the overruling authority in Eretz ...



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