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10

Well, Eliyahu's most-famous, grandest miracle, the battle with the priests of Ba'al on Mount Carmel, was for the benefit of the Israelites who were straying from God's path. I think that counts for something. Tradition accords many other miracles to Eliyahu, again for the benefit of Jews. Elisha performed other miracles than the ones you list. Here are ...


10

R' Yaakov Weinberg, in an audio recording, addressed this issue (as an issue with the ani maamin, which R' Weinberg, like you, rejected), and he explained that the point of the Rambam is not to say that the specific texts which we have now are identical to the one transmitted to Moshe. Rather, the point of the Rambam is to say that Moshe was a faithful ...


7

There is a question asked, to which I have heard two answers: Chazal teach us that there are many times when Moshiach will not come, such as on Shabbos or Yom Tov (Eruvin 43b). So how can one expect that Moshiach will come at any time? I have heard quoted, but do not know the exact citation of, a teshuva of the Nodeh B'Yehuda (R' Yechezkel Landau) who was ...


7

Q. Judaism consists of many people blindly following what they are told, A. While we have faith and a normative set of rules, there is constant learning, study and questioning. In some ways, Americans who drive the speed limit are simply following what they are told. Q. ...are intolerable of others' lives, A. I don't know why you would think that. While ...


7

I've asked this question to several talmidei chachamim, and all of them have given me the same general response: the Rambam shouldn't be taken too literally, as after all, he certainly knew the passages in Chazal which you've quoted. What he means is that, for all intents and purposes, we have the same Torah. The very slight differences of a plene spelling ...


6

[OP]: Is this true that Elijah and Elisha didn't perform any miracle to help Jews? Of course not. See the previous answer for a few details. [OP]: Christians claim that Elijah and Elisha helped almost nobody. This is not a Christian claim, nor is it claimed in the text cited. The New Testament quote is quite clear that the point being made is that ...


4

The Chazon Ish himself says that this is the common view among Chassidim. Indeed the Baal Shem Tov is well known to have defined it in the way the Chazon Ish says not to. It should be pointed out that the Chazon Ish's characterization is an oversimplification of the view. In this article, R. Shlomo Brody discusses various sources brought by R. Daniel Stein. ...


3

On the whole, even the wicked people (or idolators) of the Bible do believe in some form of theism, even if not monotheism or the God of Israel, יקוה. To quote the Encyclopedia of the Bible and Its Reception on "Atheism": The theoretical objection to the idea of the existence of god(s) is beyond the intellectual world of ANE [Ancient Near East] and HB/OT ...


2

See this translation of a talk of the Lubavitcher Rebbe about the difference between Emunah and Bitachon: An excerpt from there about Bitachon: Trust, by contrast, implies not only that a person believes that his sustenance comes from G‑d, but also that we rely on Him, with absolute certainty, to provide it. An excerpt about Emunah (footnote 12): ...


2

First of all, the question of which mitzvos make up the 613 quota might not have any practical ramification. The Rambam writes in his introduction that his motivation for setting down the 613 commandments is just a means to keep the Torah's laws organized. However, most commentaries printed on the Sefer Hamitzvos believe otherwise, so I'll answer the ...


2

There is a seffer called Bitachon Ish who brings proofs to the Chazzon Ish's opinion from earlier sources. http://www.hebrewbooks.org/51363


1

There are many sources that discuss this issue, some of which give complicated accounts as to exactly what "emunah" should be, and suffice it to say that this is subject to significant dispute. While some did believe that the better form of faith is one that you might call 'blind', it appears that most of the Rishonim held that the commandment to believe in ...


1

The reform movement accepts all modern critical scholarship about the Bible at face value. As such, they do not feel halacha is binding but have only two imperatives: monotheism and morality. There are reform traditionalists who like ritual but don't consider it obligatory and classical (I like to call them High Church because that's what their services feel ...


1

it is summarized here (according to the translator's very limited understanding) http://dafyomireview.com/398#sum where it says "the third premise states that anything composite cannot be eternal..." (I happen to be the translator BTW) Basically what he is saying is that only that which is truly infinite can be eternal and if there were two gods, then ...


1

You have an image of Judaism as immoral, parochial and oppressive. But this is the opposite of how Jews throughout the ages have seen Judaism. I recommend reading a few books by authors to emphasize that Judaism is a system which (when implemented correctly) not only establishes morality, happiness and fulfillment for individuals and families, but also ...


1

the first two gates of chovos halevavos have the theme of emuna. the third has the theme of the duty of serving God the fourth deals with bitachon, trusting in God like a slave trusts in his master for providing his needs. so it seems they are separate themes, but not completely. it is a kind of build up. you cannot have trust without faith, and ...


1

The Sabba of Novardok in his sefer madregas haadom has a lengthy chapter on the idea of bitachon. He brings it down as a machlokes between the ramban and the chovos halevavos regarding what hitadlus a person should take. The ramban is of the opinion that no hishtadlus is necessary, so long as a person has bitachon even zero hishtadlus will yeild results. ...



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