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22

It certainly doesn't mean electricity! The truth is, we don't really know what it means. And whatever it is, studying it is dangerous! Some of you may recall the story in BT Hagiga 13a, where a child is studying Ezekiel, ponders over the meaning of hashmal, and was consumed by fire. You have been warned... From the context, it appears to be some kind of ...


10

Rashi to that verse, and Tosafos in Bechoros 5a (s.v. Esrim), ask this question. They answer (based on the Targum of the verse) that there were actually separate measuring utensils that had to be made in the listed denominations. See there for the detailed explanation of what each one was used for. Update: Here is how it is presented by D.A.F. Resources: ...


10

Rashi implies that the practice was to salt the infant to strengthen its flesh. (See also Malbim.) According to Abarbanel, the salt was added in the water to strengthen the infant's body, but also (it seems) for extra hydration. Apparently, salting newborns was an ancient practice that was also recommended by Soranus of Ephesus. From here: Soranus ...


8

The commentary M'tzudas Tziyon says it means a clear, smokeless fire. The commentary Mahari [=R. Yosef] Kara says it means a tongue of fire.


7

According to Abarbanel, the several prophecies in Chapters 29-32 of Ezekiel are all concerning the future of Egypt (the future from Ezekiel's perspective), but they will not all happen at the same time. The first prophecies were realized during the reign of Nebuchadnezzar and his conquering Egypt, and the later prophecies will be realized before the coming ...


6

It means you weren't salted. It seems to be some sort of old tradition that somehow treating newborns with salt (externally, by rubbing, I suppose) was good for the flesh of the child. See Rashi there. He explains that it "hardens" the flesh. Targum doesn't seem to think anything of it and "translates" it straight as salting (it's the same word in Aramaic, ...


5

Targum on that passuk spells out the numbers and Rashi quotes him. Each chaya has 64 wings. They each have four partzuphim, each partzuph has four faces and each face has four wings. 4 X 4 x 4=64. Then, being that he saw 4 chayos turns out he saw 256 wings.


5

Remember that man for good and Chanania ben Chizkia is his name for if not for him the seffer Yechezkel would have been hidden, for his words contradict the Torah. What did he do, he brought three hundred barrels of oil and sat in the upper dwelling and expounded. Shabbos 13b. Just so happens that the things that Yechezkel said which contradicted the Torah ...


4

According to מעדני מלכים no. 187, citing the כסף משנה to Rambam, Hilchot Avel 2:1 that only things that are "מפורש בתורה ממש," only things that are absolutely explicit in the Torah are considered to be mitzvos on the Biblical level; if it's not absolutely clear, then it is considered to be "מדברי סופרים." He doesn't consider "שארו" to be absolutely ...


4

Tammuz originated as a Sumerian shepherd god. In Babylonia, the month Tammuz was established in honor of the eponymous god Tammuz, who originated as a Sumerian shepherd-god, The idolatrous ritual of mourning corresponded with the changing of the seasons. the Babylonians marked the decline in daylight hours and the onset of killing summer heat and ...


3

Is this a scientific question or a halachik one? Just because salting a newborn was a good way to treat them, doesn't mean it's the only good way. If we have better ways of treating their skin we use them. To say that the prophet deems that this is the only acceptable way to treat them requires more than just a description of good care. Today we have much ...


3

On 40:1 (where Yechezkel's prophecy is dated "the 25th year of our exile, on Rosh Hashanah, the tenth of the month, in the 14th year after the city was destroyed"), Abarbanel argues that "Rosh Hashanah" can mean anniversary of the exile. So according to him, at least, not only the months but also the years לגלותנו may indeed be counted consistently from ...


2

Rashi to Yechezkeil 45:17 says that he thinks the Nasi in the end of that Sefer is the Kohein Gadol, but that he heard that Rav Menachem (?) thought it was the King. Metzudot and Malbim to 44:3 seem to agree with the latter view, although they don't explicitly extend it to all references to a Nasi.


1

The Ohr Chaim on Bamidbar 3:45 writes that the firstborn will serve in the Third Temple. שאמרו ז"ל עתידה עבודה שתחזור לבכורות Yonathan Eybeschutz writes in Ahavat Yonatan on the haftorah for Emor, that in the future, there will be atonement for the sin of the golden calf, and thus the firstborn will return to temple service. I've seen many who are puzzled ...


1

It would seem that the description of such a child as “rebellious” and “transgressor” is not in reference to the parents' wrongful conduct at the time of intercourse, but rather to the child's own predisposition to future sin as a result of this. The Zohar (See Zohar II, 204b; III, 80-82, explained in the end of the 2nd chapter of Tanya) writes that during ...


1

:/.גמרא בבא בתרא צ אמר שמואל: אין מוסיפין על המדות יותר משתות, ולא על המטבע יתר משתות והמשתכר אל ישתכר יותר משתותאמר... אמר רב חסדא, שמואל קרא אשכח ודרש: +יחזקאל מ"ה+ והשקל עשרים גרה עשרים שקלים חמשה ועשרים שקלים עשרה וחמשה שקל המנה יהיה לכם,מנה - מאתן וארבעין הוו! אלא שמע מינה תלת, ש"מ: מנה של קדש כפול היה, ושמע מינה: מוסיפין על המדות ואין מוסיפין יותר ...



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