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8

I have a volume at hand titled "Seder Tikun L'lel Shavuos V'hosha'na Raba Hashalem Im T'hilim", published in 1964 by "Or Habahir" in Israel. I'm not about to list in detail all the texts included in its Shavuos litany (sorry), but here's what they are briefly: An introductory prayer. The beginning and end of each "parsha", in order. (Collated. I mean, the ...


8

Avudraham cites the following verses for a couple of the lines: "ki vanu vacharta" from D'varim 7:7 "v'osanu kidashta mikol ha'amim" from D'varim 26:19 He also gives these non-citation explanations of the sources of the ideas: "t'chila l'mikra'ei kodesh" due to the fact that shabas is listed first among the holidays (in Vayikra 23) "zecher liy'tzi'as ...


8

Taamei Haminhagim (citing Machazeh Avraham, by R. Avraham of Buczacz) says that it is because the ushpiza for the seventh day of Sukkos is King David, and he used to stay up all night studying Torah - so we do the same to evoke his corresponding Divine attribute. R. Chaim Vital (Pri Eitz Chayim and Shaar Hakavanos, cited in Nitei Gavriel) give a different ...


7

I think the source of this minhag is in the Talmud (TB Rosh Hashana 17b): ויעבור ה' על פניו ויקרא א"ר יוחנן אלמלא מקרא כתוב אי אפשר לאומרו מלמד שנתעטף הקב"ה כשליח צבור והראה לו למשה סדר תפלה אמר לו כל זמן שישראל חוטאין יעשו לפני כסדר הזה ואני מוחל להם (Roughly: "Hashem passed before him, and He called" (Shmot 34:6): Said R' Yochanan: if this scripture were ...


7

I live in Sydney Australia and I can say definitively that yes the custom is to stay up all night and learn on Shavuot night. I have never heard the suggestion that staying up all night is related to the time of sunrise/sunset at that time of year. I have many friends in South Africa and can say that they have the same custom as well. My inclination is that ...


7

Welcome to judaism.stackexchange.com! I apologize if this is confusing, but often there's some difference between what you'll get if you just open up and read a Bible, compared with the standard practices observed by Jews today. Many of the Biblical laws of impurity aren't really of concern to us in our normal daily lives as we're not planning on entering ...


6

The first paragraph of kiddush is Biblical verses. The second paragraph is part of the core text of prayers, which were presumably finalized by Anshei Knesset HaGedolah, "The Men of the Great Assembly", i.e. the rabbinic leaders during the early Second Temple period, about 2300 years ago. (See Rambam Berachot 1:5) The same goes for something like the Amida ...


6

Because it has a slicha begining with "Bmotzei Mnucha" (At the end of the day of rest) and we can't say slichos and 13 midos before midnight. The source mentions Magen Avraham 525:5 which cannot be true (there is no such sif katan 525:5, and in general this siman is about borrowing on Yom Tov). Most likely it is referring to ...


6

According to the Siddur HaRashash as set forth in Shaar HaKavvanot 89a(the paragraph that starts with the words זהו הסדר). Tikun Leil Shavuot: Genesis 1:1-Gen 2:4 Gen 6:6-6:12 Gen 11:30-12:3 Gen 17:25-18:3 Gen 22:22-23:3 Gen 25:16-21 Gen 28:7-12 Gen 32:3-8 Gen 36:41-37:3 Gen 40:21-41:3 Gen 44:15-20 Gen 47:23-28 Gen 50:24-Ex 1:3 Ex ...


5

From Wikipedia: The Tikkun Leil Shavuot ("Rectification for Shavuot Night") consists of excerpts from the beginning and end of each of the 24 books of Tanakh (including the reading in full of several key sections such as the account of the days of creation, The Exodus, the giving of the Ten Commandments and the Shema) and the 63 books of Mishnah. This is ...


5

The Torah spells out (Lev. 23:32) that Yom Kippur begins בתשעה לחדש בערב, in the evening of 9 Tishrei, and that it runs מערב עד ערב, from evening to evening. As explained by the Gemara, Rosh Hashanah 9a, the words בתשעה לחדש בערב teach us that מוסיפין מחול על הקדש - we have to start Yom Kippur a little earlier than sunset and end it a little after ...


5

The Talmud (Megillah 7b) very clearly rules that one who ate his Purim meal at night has not fulfilled his obligation to have a meal on Purim. The Mordechai (Moed, Remez 787) quotes the Raavyah who (as understood by the Bach OC 695) rules that the night of Purim should have a seudah, and the Gemara is only saying that the obligation for the main meal must ...


5

Rabbi Moshe Feinstein says yes, "if needed". (I.e. there's a legitimate reason why you couldn't do the wedding a day or two earlier.) His cousin-once-removed, Rabbi Joseph Dov Soloveichik, said no. Rabbi Soloveichik's argument: "if the Talmud debated whether the fast starts at night, and some later rabbis thought you start saying the fast-day prayers at ...


5

The minhag to say Hamapil at the end is so the beracha is semucha to (just before) sleep. That is that there should be no hefsek (break) between the beracha and falling asleep. The minhag held by the Gra and other achronim is to day Hamapil first. They reason that the psukim said afterwards are not considered a hefsek. I am basing what I wrote on Siddur ...


5

Regarding questions 1 and 2, the Rama rules (OC 596) that one should not blow the shofar unnecessarily on Rosh HaShana just like one avoids musical instruments on other Shabbatot and Yamim Tovim. So it would seem forbidden to blow for the sick person at night. The Magen Avraham there rules that one cannot practice on the first day in the afternoon for the ...


5

The Shulchan Aruch (OC 89:5) discusses what to do if you were eating before dawn (alot hashachar; the earliest time for Shacharit), and then dawn happened (and now you are obligated in Shacharit): must you stop eating or not. It seems from here that you are allowed to eat so long as dawn has not happened. The Mishna Berura there notes that if the eating is ...


5

In the siddur of Rabbi Shabtai from Rashkov, which presents kavvanot of the Arizal (many books do, it's just the one I have at hand), it says, in the section 'Kriat Shma she-al Ha-Mita': אין ללמוד מקרא בלילה כי הקורא בלי פירוש עומדת בעשייה מקום תגבורת הדינין ואין ראוי לעוררן בזמן שליטתן שהוא לילה One should not learn Miqra at night because reading ...


5

The seventh day of Pesah is associated in rabbinic literature with the splitting of the sea (for example, Rashi on Exodus 14:5 s.v. vayyuggad lemelekh mitzrayim writes that "on the fifth and sixth days they chased after them, and the night of the seventh they entered the sea, and in the morning uttered song, namely the seventh day of Pesah, and thus we sing ...


4

Tosfot on Brachot 2a (link) say (quoting Rabbeinu Tam and the Ri) that the essential Kri'at Shma is the one in shul, even though we say Shma while it is still daytime. Rashi, on the other hand, rules that one must repeat the first section of Shma after dark, and the bedtime Kri'at Shma suffices. The Raavyah agrees with Rabbeinu Tam (according to the ...


4

See Yeshiva.org here (under heading תיקון ליל שבועות, number 15 [טו]): לימוד נשים - נשים אינן חייבות בתיקון ליל שבועות, ואם הן באות ולומדות תנ"ך וכד' תבוא עליהן ברכה (שו"ת רב פעלים א, או"ח סוד ישרים, סי' ט). And here (second paragraph under heading "staying up at night") Responsa Rav Pa’alim (Sod Yesharim 9) points out that for mystical reasons ...


4

See Moishe Dovid Lebovits, "Lag B'Omer," 5 Towns Jewish Times: Night or Day. Many have the custom to make the bonfires (and dancing) on the night of Lag B’omer. Others say that the simcha should start at day.85 However, it seems that the minhag is to conduct the bonfire and dancing at night all over the world, not only in Meron.86 ...


4

Mishna B'rura 619:4 says to put on the talis during the day so as to be able to say the b'racha on it; one does not, he says, say the b'racha on it if putting it on at night. That's the way I read it; CYLOR for practical matters.


4

Shabbat starts no later than sunset (Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayim 293:2). Sunset is a subjective phenomenon describing the apparent descent of the Sun below the horizon. It happens because the Earth is round and rotates about its own axis much more quickly than it revolves around the Sun, so observers on its surface observe, once per rotation, their part of ...


4

According to this article about that Ekirch book, coffee was one of the reasons the custom of second-sleep ended. In this article about the history of the tikkun leil Shavuot custom (pdf), Rabbi Dr. Schein attributes coffee as one of the factors for staying up all night on Shavuot. Also in the Schein article, however, he also attributes the custom of the ...


4

The Piskei Tshuvos 581:3 brings in the footnotes from the Aruch Hashulchan seif 12 that one should not blow at night the whole month of elul even to practice because we don't do hissarirus at night.He also brings the Igros Moshe 4:21 that when the Rama said that there are those who blow shofar at night he meant after mincha or places who daven maariv during ...


3

Bottom line is that Sepharadim's minhag is like the Geonim's psak. In Yalkut Yossef (of R Yitzchak Yossef, son of R Ovadia), Hilchot Shabbat, Siman 293, halacha 2-3, the psak is: ב. זמן צאת השבת בכל ערי הארץ הוא בערך כעשרים דקות אחר השקיעה. והמחמירים מוסיפים מחול על הקודש עד כחצי שעה אחר השקיעה. [...] [end of halacha dropped by me] ג. אולם ראוי ...


3

Disclaimer: this answer does not deal with the latest time for mincha. It assumes that the question refers to a time when one for sure cannot pray mincha. If it's really not the time for mincha at all then don't say Amen as the blessings are levatala. I can't prove this for late mincha specifically, but by a late shacharit, the Biur Halacha (OC 89 sv ...


2

The Gemara in Menahot 43a excludes "clothing at night" from tzitzit because of the pasuk "וראיתם אתו" in Bamidbar 15:39. The Shulchan Aruch in O"H 18:1 quotes a machloket rishonim on how to interpret this gemara: Rambam: At night, you are patur from wearing tzitzit on your garment, regardless of what kind of garment it is. Rosh: If the garment is ...


2

The answer I was always told (need to look this up; I think it's Mishnah Brurah?) is: A.) If you'd already fallen asleep, there's no problem of talking-after-HaMapil as you already slept some. B.) If it's just urination, no bracha is needed as it will be covered by the Asher Yatzar you say in the morning. Just go back to sleep. (Well, washing for ...


2

From Halachically Speaking (Vol 6, Issue 8), "The Three Weeks": There is a discussion among the poskim if one has to refrain from the actions which are not done during the three weeks from the morning of Shiva Asar B’tamuz or even the night before? Most poskim say that one should refrain from doing these activities even from the night before, from ...



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