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6

From Webster Dictionary Latin tropus, from Greek tropos turn, way, manner, style, trope, from trepein to turn First Known Use: 1533 The most common Hebrew term I have heard for this is טעמי המקרא. Interesting to note that both terms seem to focus on different aspects of what "trope" is or does. The Latin root has a definition meaning "style", and ...


6

Mr. Gale’s parents had a sense of humor. “Yah-Chupetz-Ville” is none other than Sholom Aleichem’s Yehupetz, the fictional name given by the great Yiddish writer to the Ukrainian capital of Kiev, then part of Czarist Russia, in which he and his family lived for several years, and in and near which many of his stories take place. source: ...


5

Many people tried to differentiate between "אמר" and "דבר". There are several midrashim and a gemera in Makkos (11a) that identify דיבור as a "harsh" (קשה) way of speaking based on Gen. 42:30, and אמירה is "softer" (רכה). While some (including Torah Temima) take this literally to mean that דיבור and אמירה are different primarily in tone, others (N. H. ...


4

עם הארץ literally means "people of the land" or natives. In Avraham's time the natives were the Bnei Cheis, but in the time of Ezra, when the Jews returned from Babylonia to the land of Israel, עם הארץ referred to the current natives, many of whom were Jews who were not scrupulous in their observance of mitzvos. In fact, many of them intermarried ...


4

The Midrash Rabbah (תשא פ' מב ופ' סח) and the Midrash Tanchuma (פר' צו) and the Sifri (פר' בהעלותך) teach that "דיבור" is a harsh way of speaking, and "אמירה" is a soft way of speaking.


3

I have heard that the Bais Yosef was called The Mechaber since he combined (Chibur = connect) all the different Talmidei Chachomim in one location to come to a Halachic conclusion.


3

According to Balashon, the oldest usage is Mishnaic for "remission of debt" and says that according to Jastrow and Steinberg, it originates from a presumed root, "to wipe, wipe out". On the other hand, Klein states that the etymology is unknown (see above).


2

The Vilna Gaon in Aderes Eliyahu on the first verse in Ha'azinu says that וידבר is linked to Torah Shebichsav, and ויאמר is linked to Torah Sheb'al Peh. He explains that this is why communication with Moshe is always with וידבר, and the only place where Hashem speaks to a Navi with וידבר is in reviewing a law from the Torah, when it reviews the laws of ...


2

"Chajes" is not the English version of the name, but the German version, which would point to a pronunciation of "חַיֶס". In Hebrew, though, there's a vav, which it seems was pronounced as a cholam. But I can't find any explicit evidence for this. If you look at his Iggeres Bikores republished in 1853 by Jacob Brull, you'll see the German version "Chajes" ...


2

I have usually heard the name pronounced as stated in the Wikipedia article, especially in academic settings. Whenever I hear the pronunciation like 'khee-us' I assume that it's because people feel uncomfortable giving an achron a last name that can mean 'animals'. A few people have speculated over the origin and meaning of the name. One source that I can ...


2

In the Chumash, we find "Malki-tzedek, king of Shalem", as well as Avraham referring to the place of Akeidat Yitzchak as "Hashem Yireh." The midrash says those names were combined, "Yireh+Shalem" -> "Yerushalayim." Note that in Aramaic, it's pronounced "Yerushlame", which fits with how it's written Biblically -- no yud before the final mem. However in ...


2

Although מרגלים is a term used to refer to spies throughout Tanach (such as the brothers of Yosef as alleged spies [B'reishis 42:9,11,14,16], the spies who spied out the Land of Israel in the days of Y'hoshua [Y'hoshua 2:1; ibid. 6:21,23], and the spies dispatched by David to locate Shaul [Sh'muel I 26:4]), the noun itself is not used to describe the spies ...


2

Nachal Eshkol at the end of his introduction to Sefer HaEshkol says that מחילה comes from the root חלל, which he says means to weaken or loosen: טעמו להחליש ולרפה העוון כהוראת שורש חלל וחללה שטעמו נקוב וחלול, נתרוקן ונחלש, ונתגזר מזה שם כלי שיר 'חליל' בהיותו ריק וחלול ונקרא הגוף במותו חלל כשנתרוקן מנפש ורוח מחילה is accordingly to minimize the sin, as ...


2

The sefer שו"ת נודע ביהודה מהדורה קמא - או"ח סימן לג writes: That which the Magen Avraham writes in Siman 607 in the name of the Shelah Hakodosh to say סליחה לעונות ומחילה לפשעים is certainly a copyist error, because in the sefer שני לוחות הברית itself he writes the opposite, and it is impossible to suggest that there it is a copyist error since he ...


2

Kittel is German and means "smock, overall". The ultimate etymology of the German word is debated. See this: http://www.dwds.de/?qu=kittel


1

From Webster's dictionary: Origin of KITTEL Yiddish kitel, from Middle High German kitel, kietel cotton or hempen outer garment, probably from Arabic qutn cotton I've never seen a hemp kittel. Isn't hemp the stuff they USED to wrap etrogim (or "esroygim" in yeshivish) hat "invented" the "foam"? I would imagine a hemp kittel would be somewhat ...


1

Yalqut Shim'oni cites Masekhet Sotah (13B) which states (English, Original): א"ר שמואל בר נחמני א"ר יונתן לצאת ולבוא בדברי תורה מלמד שנסתתמו ממנו שערי חכמה R. Samuel b. Nahmani said in the name of R. Jonathan: [It means] to ‘go out and come in’ with words of Torah, thus indicating that the gates of wisdom were closed off to him.



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