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6

The Ibn Ezra (cited by the Malbim as being in Parshas Bo, but I assume he means to refer to his comments to Shemos 3:15) explains that ה' צבא-ות refers to Hashem being the upholder of the צבא השמים. The Radak to Yeshaya 6:3 says that it refers to the armies on High and below. The Malbim to Yeshaya 6:3 (you can see it here), in explaining the line ק' ק' ק' ...


5

Linguistically, either there is no connection, or they are closely related, depending on which root you decide is being employed. Ernest Klein's Etymological Dictionary (page 654) has 2 separate words spelled שיח. One is "speak, talk, converse" and is traced to the Arabic (was diligent) and is also spelled with a samech. The other means a shrub, traced to ...


4

I too was always bothered as to the origins of this word, until I saw the following Midrash Lekach Tov on Parshas Beha'aloscha: ומהו לשון סנהדרין, סין זה תורה שניתנה מהר סיני, הדרין שמהדרין התורה במדרשה ומיפים ומישרין הכתוב זה עם זה-"What is the meaning of the term 'Sanhedrin'? 'Sin' refers to the Torah which was given from Mount 'Sin'ai, 'hadrin': since ...


4

According to vocabulary.com, it is a Yiddish word of Slavic origin akin to "nebohy," Czech for "wretched;" & "nieboe," Polish for "poor creature."


4

R' Samson Raphael Hirsch, in his commentary on these two verses and on Genesis 2:5, says that "שיח," in both contexts, refers to "growth." In 21:15, R' Hirsch interprets "תַּחַת אַחַד הַשִּׂיחִם" as, generically, "under something that was growing there," underlining Hagar's panicked indifference to where she dropped Yishmael, to the point of not taking note ...


4

According to an interview, the name comes because the publisher made fancy ketubot: Y.H. [interviewer]: If I remember correctly, ArtScroll started off publishing fancy high-end kesubos… N[osson] S[cherman of ArtScroll]: Yes, ArtScroll’s name came from that. Meir Zlotowitz had a company that was involved in such printing.


3

As mentioned in yydl's answer, the Hebrew noun "מחזור" ("machzor") means "cycle" in English. This is the usage found in Pirkei d'Rabbi Eliezer (ch. 6-8) and other midrashic literature. According to the Hebrew Wikipedia article "מחזור תפילה", citing Daniel Goldschmidt's preface to Shadal's Introduction to the Machzor of the Community of Rome, this term was ...


3

from Menachem Mendel: The earliest apparent source for using the term ḥallah in connection with the bread that is eaten on Shabbat can be found in the 15th c. German work Leket Yosher (p. 49) [See John Cooper’s Eat and Be Satisfied: A Social History of Jewish Food]: וזכורני שבכל ע”ש עושין לו ג’ חלות דקות הנילושות בביצים ושמן ומעט מים. וחלה ...


2

R. Aryeh Kaplan's commentary on the verse (2:8), from The Living Torah, states that Eden means "Delight in Hebrew." The Meam Lo'ez (which Kaplan helped translate from the Ladino) explains that "the Torah informs us that God planted a delightful place in the east." The latest edition of the Encyclopedia Judaica essentially states this as well. It discusses ...


2

The Sefer Hachinuch (13th cent.) seems to refer to students of Jewish mysticism as "the mekubalim" (mitava 98): משרשי המצוה. שצונו השם יתברך להיות נר דולק בבית המקדש להגדלת הבית לכבוד ולתפארת בעיני הרואים, כי כן דרך בני איש להתכבד בבתיהם בנרות דולקים, וכל ענין ההגדלה בו כדי שיכניס האדם בלבו כשיראהו מורא וענוה. וכבר אמרנו (במצוה טז) כי במעשה הטוב תכשר ...


2

The term is present in the Mishna ; one of the earliest pieces of rabbinic literature (early 3rd century redaction of earlier teachings). E.g. Avot (2: 7), (3: 11), (4: 1), (5: 19). Various allusions to it are adduced from the Torah, but the lack of explicit reference to it has been noted and discussed throughout the ages. See the answers to this question: ...


2

Wikipedia says the following: In 1975,[1] Zlotowitz, a graduate of Mesivtha Tifereth Jerusalem, was director of a high-end graphics studio in New York.[2] The firm, named ArtScroll Studios,[1] produced brochures,[3] invitations, awards and ketubahs.[1]… The name ArtScroll was chosen for the publishing company to emphasize the visual ...


1

The meaning "measure" came first, and only in medieval Hebrew did shiur come to mean lesson - "a set measure of learning" (that sense is preserved in shiurei bayit שיעורי בית - "homework"), followed by the modern Hebrew sense of "class". The word shiur derives from the root שער meaning, "to calculate, to estimate, to measure". The verb form only ...


1

Etymologically, the verb כתר (from whence we get the Hebrew noun, כתר, meaning "crown") means to surround, or encircle. In the Aramaic pael (as perhaps in Job 36:2) it can also have the added nuance of expecting something, or lying in wait. The derived noun, כֹתרת, appears in Tanakh in reference to the head of a pillar (so, for example, 1 Kings 7:16 and ...


1

The Rashash on Rashi there (Shabbos 23b d.h. mishum shalom beiso) explains the reference to mean marital harmony and connects it to the mishah in bameh madlikin about the wife lighting the ner shabbos and the fact that beiso is used to refer to a wife, ayin sham.


1

As a fluent Yiddish speaker, I feel obliged to answer this question. The meaning of the word "kittel" (Yid: קיטל) is "little robe" in the German dialect of Yiddish. :) Hope this helps.


1

R. Avraham b. haRambam writes in the beginnining of Va'Eirah (7:8): לא ידעתי [מה החילוק] בין ויאמר לוידבר ולמה אמר פעם ויאמר ופעם וידבר ואם רק הוא מכם רק "I do not know what's the difference between VaYomer and VaYedaber, and why sometimes the Torah uses one, and sometimes the other, and if it seems meaningless, it's your shortcoming."


1

I heard Rabbi Yitzhak Yosef and his father Rav Ovadia z'l pronounce it "Maharatz Hauyt"



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