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16

Leib (as well as Label, Leibush and Loeb) is the Yiddish version of the German Name Loeb which means Lion (from the German for lion, Löwe). The English equivalent of this name is often Leo or Leon which are root in the Latin word for lion, leo. [Source: Kolatch, Alfred J. 1984. The Complete Dictionary of English and Hebrew First Names. Middle Village: ...


13

Its source may be the Arabic name Farida, which means "unique / precious" (as opposed to the Germanic name Frida, which means "peace"). [link]


12

לפי תלמוד בבלי מסכת עירובין צו. מיכל בת שאול הניחה תפלין. האר"י מסביר זאת בכך שהייתה לה נשמה מעלמא דדכורא = נשמה מעולם הזכרים.‏ http://he.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D7%9E%D7%99%D7%9B%D7%9C Maybe that is how the name became a male name?


11

Another name probably related to these is עוקבא Ukva (borne by several people in the Amoraic and Geonic eras). This site lists only one proto-Semitic root עקב (although, as usual, the various descendant languages extend it in different senses). So it's most probable that Akiva is indeed based on the same root as Yaakov, and means something like ...


11

According to Merriam-Webster: Etymology: Yiddish yarmlke, from Polish jarmułka & Ukrainian yarmulka skullcap, of Turkic origin; akin to Turkish yağmurluk rainwear


11

From Jastrow, page 299: This seems like a better, and more straightforward, etymology. There is a clear basis in Ezra 7:23: כג כָּל-דִּי, מִן-טַעַם אֱלָהּ שְׁמַיָּא, יִתְעֲבֵד אַדְרַזְדָּא, לְבֵית אֱלָהּ שְׁמַיָּא: דִּי-לְמָה לֶהֱוֵא קְצַף, עַל-מַלְכוּת מַלְכָּא וּבְנוֹהִי. 23 Whatsoever is commanded by the God of heaven, let it be done exactly for the ...


11

Yoshke is simply a Yiddish diminutive nickname for Yehoshua (Joshua, for which a parallel English nickname would be Josh). Thus, it was simply a way for European Jews to make reference to Jesus in a manner that (a) conveyed the idea that Jesus was not viewed as important and (b) not likely to be picked up on by nearby Gentiles. I doubt there is any record ...


10

It doesn't mean anything. It stands for Yaray Malka. (Fear of G-d)


10

In Igros Moshe Orach Chaim 5:10:2 Reb Moshe ZaTzaL writes that Michel is a Kinui (nickname) for Yechiel.


10

Some claim it is a variant of the Greek word Phoebos, meaning "bright," which is why it goes together with Shraga (= flame in Aramaic). However, others dispute this etymology. Here is one interesting alternative: "Feivel" does not come from the "Phobos" (aka Apollo), the Greek Sun God! (This was a false etymology put about by German Jewish scholars in ...


10

Welhelm Gesenius suggests in his Hebrew Dictionary of Tanach that the word derives from the Coptic saht (woven) + nuje (false). He also notes the Septuagent's rendering κίβδηλος (spurious). A pdf of the dictionary page can be found here. Ibn Ezra already notes in his commentary to Vayikra 19:19 that the word is a dis legomenon and as such we can't know for ...


9

Wikipedia says it's "probably derived from the Old High German kraepfo meaning grape." However, I would think it's more likely related to crepe (French for a type of pancake that's often filled, much like a krepel).


9

Leib is the Yiddish word for lion (aryeh).


9

From TheSanhedrin.org: Etymologically, Sanhedrin is a late Hebrew representation of the Greek word synedrion συνέδριον meaning "sitting together" as a legislative assembly or Senate.


8

The following links may be of interest: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:Jewish_surnames http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Category:English_surnames_from_German http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Category:English_surnames_from_Hebrew http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_surnames


8

Michel (emphasis on the first syllable) is a German form of Michael (says Wikipedia)


8

A search on Hebrewbooks yields the following earlier (16th-century) uses of the Hebrew סברת הכרס: Radvaz, teshuvah 1463: זו סברת הכרס היא Yam Shel Shlomo, Gittin 4:28: וכל אחד עושה לו סברת הכרס כמו שיחפוץ ...and I'm sure there are others too. Considering that Radvaz lived nowhere near any Yiddish speakers, I doubt that the Hebrew is a calque of the ...


8

Jastrow (page 375) on the word ותיק: And then from Vatikin as a description of the men who did this -> the practice. I think Mishnaic Hebrew, with a comparison to Arabic and Biblical Hebrew.


8

According to this article, it is from the Medieval German word, Gottvater (godfather).


8

On a simple level, Shechina refers to the manifestation of G-dliness that can be perceived even by created beings. To quote a letter from the Lubavitcher Rebbe: Nevertheless, G-d desired that the divine influences upon creation... and the divine immanence in the world should also include elements that the human mind can comprehend. […] This ...


8

The entire prayer, except for the last line, is in Aramaic. צלי, צלא, or צלו are different constructs of the word meaning "pray". צלותהון means "their prayers". As for the root, I believe it is likely correct that it is צלא, though a part of me wants to go digging in my old Aramaic text books to rule out the possibility that it is צלי. I have never heard ...


7

They are related mystically. Arizal states that Akiva was a gilgul of Yakov Avinu. One of his supports are the similarity in name. Additional point he makes is : both married a woman named Rachel. He says that Yakov needed to atone for the 22 years he was away from his father Yitzchak. Akiva accomplished this by serving his Rebbe, Nachum Ish Gamzu, for 22 ...


7

It's from "yehudah", because most of the Jews nowadays are from the shevet of yehudah.


7

Etymonline gives it as from Russian латка, "pastry", which may have come eventually from Ancient Greek ἐλαία, "olive" (or maybe it means modern Greek ελαία, "olive". I'm not sure).


7

We see that G-d calls it "Chag HaMatzot" and we call it "Chag HaPesach". G-d calls it Chag HaMatzot (In the Torah) to express praise of the Jews. They left Egypt with only some dough, so great was their faith in G-d. G-d calls it Chag HaMatzot to celebrate that fact. The Jews call it "Chag HaPesach" to celebrate the fact that G-d passed over the Jews ...


7

There's a Sefer by that name from 90 years ago - תרפג/1923. A search of HebrewBooks.org seems to show that the term was not used [much] earlier. A search of Toras Emeth Software indicates that it's not used in any of the classics (Mishna, Gemara, Rambam, Shulchan Aruch) and the earliest it finds is from the קיצור ש''ע ילקוט יוסף - the 2nd half of the 20th ...


7

Jastrow supports Yishai's answer, that "סנהדרין" derives from the Greek συνέδριον: ‎‫סַנְהֶדְרִין,‬ ‫סַנְהֶדְרֵי‬ f. (also pl.) (συνέδριον) Sanhedrin, the supreme council of the Jews; ס‫'‬ גדולה the Great S., consisting of seventy-one members; ס‫'‬ קטנה the Small S., a judicial court of twenty-three. Snh. I, 6. Ib. ראויה לס‫'‬ fit to be a seat of the ...


7

The earliest source1 seems to be from the ספר הפליאה - ספר הקנה who writes: ויש פירושים רבים שנעלמו מעיני כל חי ועתיד אליהו הנביא לפרשם וזהו מה שרמזו רז"ל בשבעה מסכתות תיקו "תשבי "יתרץ "קושיות "ובעיות. 1Before 1390, according to linked Wikipedia article


6

The Tosafos Yom Tov on the last mishna in Y'vamos (16:6) says that the diminishing volume on each register of an echo is tantamount to weakening. The reverberation is thus associated with the fairer sex. He also distinguishes between the type of bas kol that is simply the echo of a (meanwhile departed) human's voice and the type of bas kol that is some form ...


6

The term clearly occurs all over Rambam's Laws of Teshuva. For instance in 2:1 הוא בעל תשובה גמורה I don't know about earlier usages. But Rambam's code played a very strong influence on a lot of how we name things, so it doesn't surprise me that it won out. (Another interesting one is the phrase "Korban Pesach" ["Passover sacrifice."]) In the Talmud ...



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