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13

Its source may be the Arabic name Farida, which means "unique / precious" (as opposed to the Germanic name Frida, which means "peace"). [link]


12

לפי תלמוד בבלי מסכת עירובין צו. מיכל בת שאול הניחה תפלין. האר"י מסביר זאת בכך שהייתה לה נשמה מעלמא דדכורא = נשמה מעולם הזכרים.‏ http://he.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D7%9E%D7%99%D7%9B%D7%9C Maybe that is how the name became a male name?


11

Leib (as well as Label, Leibush and Loeb) is the Yiddish version of the German Name Loeb which means Lion (from the German for lion, Löwe). The English equivalent of this name is often Leo or Leon which are root in the Latin word for lion, leo. [Source: Kolatch, Alfred J. 1984. The Complete Dictionary of English and Hebrew First Names. Middle Village: ...


10

According to Merriam-Webster: Etymology: Yiddish yarmlke, from Polish jarmułka & Ukrainian yarmulka skullcap, of Turkic origin; akin to Turkish yağmurluk rainwear


9

Some claim it is a variant of the Greek word Phoebos, meaning "bright," which is why it goes together with Shraga (= flame in Aramaic). However, others dispute this etymology. Here is one interesting alternative: "Feivel" does not come from the "Phobos" (aka Apollo), the Greek Sun God! (This was a false etymology put about by German Jewish scholars in ...


9

From Jastrow, page 299: This seems like a better, and more straightforward, etymology. There is a clear basis in Ezra 7:23: כג כָּל-דִּי, מִן-טַעַם אֱלָהּ שְׁמַיָּא, יִתְעֲבֵד אַדְרַזְדָּא, לְבֵית אֱלָהּ שְׁמַיָּא: דִּי-לְמָה לֶהֱוֵא קְצַף, עַל-מַלְכוּת מַלְכָּא וּבְנוֹהִי. 23 Whatsoever is commanded by the God of heaven, let it be done exactly for the ...


9

Wikipedia says it's "probably derived from the Old High German kraepfo meaning grape." However, I would think it's more likely related to crepe (French for a type of pancake that's often filled, much like a krepel).


9

Another name probably related to these is עוקבא Ukva (borne by several people in the Amoraic and Geonic eras). This site lists only one proto-Semitic root עקב (although, as usual, the various descendant languages extend it in different senses). So it's most probable that Akiva is indeed based on the same root as Yaakov, and means something like ...


8

The following links may be of interest: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:Jewish_surnames http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Category:English_surnames_from_German http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Category:English_surnames_from_Hebrew http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_surnames


8

Jastrow (page 375) on the word ותיק: And then from Vatikin as a description of the men who did this -> the practice. I think Mishnaic Hebrew, with a comparison to Arabic and Biblical Hebrew.


8

Welhelm Gesenius suggests in his Hebrew Dictionary of Tanach that the word derives from the Coptic saht (woven) + nuje (false). He also notes the Septuagent's rendering κίβδηλος (spurious). A pdf of the dictionary page can be found here. Ibn Ezra already notes in his commentary to Vayikra 19:19 that the word is a dis legomenon and as such we can't know for ...


8

The entire prayer, except for the last line, is in Aramaic. צלי, צלא, or צלו are different constructs of the word meaning "pray". צלותהון means "their prayers". As for the root, I believe it is likely correct that it is צלא, though a part of me wants to go digging in my old Aramaic text books to rule out the possibility that it is צלי. I have never heard ...


7

They are related mystically. Arizal states that Akiva was a gilgul of Yakov Avinu. One of his supports are the similarity in name. Additional point he makes is : both married a woman named Rachel. He says that Yakov needed to atone for the 22 years he was away from his father Yitzchak. Akiva accomplished this by serving his Rebbe, Nachum Ish Gamzu, for 22 ...


7

A search on Hebrewbooks yields the following earlier (16th-century) uses of the Hebrew סברת הכרס: Radvaz, teshuvah 1463: זו סברת הכרס היא Yam Shel Shlomo, Gittin 4:28: וכל אחד עושה לו סברת הכרס כמו שיחפוץ ...and I'm sure there are others too. Considering that Radvaz lived nowhere near any Yiddish speakers, I doubt that the Hebrew is a calque of the ...


7

The term clearly occurs all over Rambam's Laws of Teshuva. For instance in 2:1 הוא בעל תשובה גמורה I don't know about earlier usages. But Rambam's code played a very strong influence on a lot of how we name things, so it doesn't surprise me that it won out. (Another interesting one is the phrase "Korban Pesach" ["Passover sacrifice."]) In the Talmud ...


7

We see that G-d calls it "Chag HaMatzot" and we call it "Chag HaPesach". G-d calls it Chag HaMatzot (In the Torah) to express praise of the Jews. They left Egypt with only some dough, so great was their faith in G-d. G-d calls it Chag HaMatzot to celebrate that fact. The Jews call it "Chag HaPesach" to celebrate the fact that G-d passed over the Jews ...


7

On a simple level, Shechina refers to the manifestation of G-dliness that can be perceived even by created beings. To quote a letter from the Lubavitcher Rebbe: Nevertheless, G-d desired that the divine influences upon creation... and the divine immanence in the world should also include elements that the human mind can comprehend. […] This ...


6

The Tosafos Yom Tov on the last mishna in Y'vamos (16:6) says that the diminishing volume on each register of an echo is tantamount to weakening. The reverberation is thus associated with the fairer sex. He also distinguishes between the type of bas kol that is simply the echo of a (meanwhile departed) human's voice and the type of bas kol that is some form ...


6

The source given there, Otzar Midrashim, is an anthology of midrashic works from different periods. In this case, the information comes from a work entitled Divrei ha-Yamim le-Moshe Rabbeinu, which is of unknown date and authorship, but at any rate predates the Aruch (11th century - beginning of the era of the Rishonim), which quotes this etymology (under ...


6

Etymonline seems to be essentially correct. Two other sources discussed in Balashon's article here describe the journey a little more explicitly: Yiddish latke, from either Russian latka or Ukrainian oladka, both derived (I assume) from Old Russian оладья, olad'ya. This is then apparently derived from the Greek ελαδια, eladia, "olive-y things", ultimately ...


6

Yoshke is simply a Yiddish diminutive nickname for Yehoshua (Joshua, for which a parallel English nickname would be Josh). Thus, it was simply a way for European Jews to make reference to Jesus in a manner that (a) conveyed the idea that Jesus was not viewed as important and (b) not likely to be picked up on by nearby Gentiles. I doubt there is any record ...


5

R' Hirsch on Gen. 7:14 had a similar conjecture: The derivation of צפור is obscure. It is to be found in צפורן, nail, and in צפיר, synonymous with שעיר the hairy one, the goat. So that צפור could be the bird called after its covering with feathers, the feathered one. The root צפר would then be common for nails, hair and feathers which are all three ...


5

There are many manuscripts and early printed seforim in which this name appears and there is a " in between the kof and tzadi. This clearly indicates that it is an acronym. One source is the seforim of the Shach, in which, although he is commonly (currently) known by the last name Katz, he is called "Kohein Tzedek. Then look here. Notice that only 9 years ...


5

It seems that according to scholars of history it isn't, though, on a theological level, Hebrew represents the primary language with which Hakadosh Barukh Hu (God) communicates. Perhaps we can say that Hebrew is therefore the spiritual root of all languages. Hebrew belongs to the Canaanite group of languages. In turn the Canaanite languages are a ...


5

Per Gemara Yevamos 5: it is Roshei taivos for שוע טווי ונוז. The Even Ezra translates Shatnez as mixture. http://www.ou.org/torah/article/kilayim_9_7-8 וראיתי לאחד מרבותינו שפירש שוע טווי הצמר לבד והפשתים לבד, ונוז כלומר ואח"כ נוז דהיינו שניהם ארוגים יחד


5

Abarbanel (Bereshis 3) makes the connection between the word for "embarrassment" (בושה) and the word for "clothing" (לבוש). Seemingly, like you said, because the clothing is a covering-up of the embarrassment, and also because clothing (or especially lack thereof) has the strong potential to embarrass a person. He writes as follows: שיש שתי תכליות בלבוש. ...


5

According to Wikipedia and the Jewish Encyclopedia, Reform Judaism, being originally opposed to the idea of Zionism1, called the Hamburg Synagogue "Tempel" to show that they no longer looked forward to the Third Temple in Jerusalem, and that individual, local, temples had taken its place. As DoubleAA points out, none of these sources offer conclusive proof ...


5

There are 876 Reform congregations in North America, 499 of which have "Temple" in their names, so the formal name is pretty common and it's not unreasonable to think that people refer to the others as "temples" too. As noted by DoubleAA, the first (apparent) use of the name was the Hamburg synagogue in 1818. Documentation about naming practices that early ...


5

The root of the word is צלי, which means "to turn" or "incline", and which has the sense of "pray" in many passages. For the former, see the Targum on Psalm 102:12 (where it corresponds to the Hebrew word of root נטה), and for the latter see Targum Onkelos on Genesis 12:8 (where it corresponds to the Hebrew word of root קרא). When it means "pray", it is ...


5

Many people tried to differentiate between "אמר" and "דבר". There are several midrashim and a gemera in Makkos (11a) that identify דיבור as a "harsh" (קשה) way of speaking based on Gen. 42:30, and אמירה is "softer" (רכה). While some (including Torah Temima) take this literally to mean that דיבור and אמירה are different primarily in tone, others (N. H. ...



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