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7

Rav Moshe Feinstein could not have said that, since it contradicts explicit passages in the Talmud: Eruvin 6b: אמר רבי יוחנן ירושלים אילמלא דלתותיה ננעלות בלילה חייבין עליה משום רשות הרבים Rabbi Yochanan says: If not for its doors being closed at night, one would transgress for carrying in a public domain in Jerusalem. Once the doors were closed, ...


7

Some experience-based recommendations: I'm just curious, which method is most durable? Steel cable like this is excellent for durability. But it is much harder to manipulate into the non-looped over-then-through formation. In general this formation is difficult to anchor and particularly unreliable if the pole has a round cross section - due to ...


6

Another point is to note that an eruv only allows us to circumvent a rabbinical safeguard, not the original Torah law. The Torah prohibits carrying in a reshus harabbim (public domain); there are various criteria that define a place as such, but whatever it is, a reshus harabbim cannot be enclosed by an eruv. The rabbis later extended the prohibition to ...


6

The Shulchan Aruch rules (OC 362:3) that a mechitza which came into being by itself counts as a mechitza at least for areas less than the amount of land you could plant 2 sa'ah of grain on (much bigger than your average backyard). So clearly at least for small areas like your backyard, the details of the mechitza's identity do not matter. Furthermore, I ...


5

Eruvin 1:10 is actually talking about a different kind of mechitzah, one based on the halachic principle of lavud (where objects within three tefachim of each other are considered joined). So the case there is that they place vertical stakes in the ground, each within three tefachim of the next. (The previous mishnah describes the opposite case - where they ...


5

The document shows a nail in a post, but what I've often seen used in eruvin (I assume for convenience) are eye bolts like these: (picture from Wikipedia)


5

The St. Louis [Missouri] Community Eruv includes portions of either side of Interstate 170.


5

I assume you are talking about the "string" that is commonly referred to as an eruv. At the expense of over-simplifying: Generally, a reshus hayachid is an area which is mostly enclosed and contains no breaches. A breach is an opening larger than 10 cubits wide. However, an opening that is more than 10 cubits is not considered a breach if it is formed ...


5

A couple good places to start would be here and here, both from the Eruv Blog. The second link, which itself contains many relevant and detailed links, addresses the technical issues of the geography, demographics, and (artificial) geology of Brooklyn that govern the permissibility/restrictions of an eruv. The first link addresses a non-legal complication ...


5

There isn't a difference in construction. The difference is that Sepharadim (traditionally) do not accept communal 'Eruvin in large cities/neighborhoods, due to the position of the Mehaber (Shulhan 'Aruch O"H 345:7) that defines* a public domain by size, not by population density. Some Many Sepharadim have accepted the Ashkenazi leniency in following the ...


4

Here's my understanding of what you have to do, based on setting one of these up, with Rabbinic guidance, for a few years in college. I've never studied the relevant laws in depth, but I believe based on what I learned in practice from my Rabbi that under normal conditions, the following procedure will do the trick. Ask your Rabbi to be sure. This will be a ...


4

Anything that would be useful for use on shabbos you can carry within an eruv (if you follow the local eruv) The Greater Boston Eruv Corporation's "Halakhot of Eruv" page has a section on the limits of Eruv use including the following three main points: Even within an Eruv, one may not enter non-Shabbat-compatible buildings (e.g. stores) on Shabbat. Even ...


3

In the positive integer number of Eruvin that I've seen, the Eruv excludes uninhabitable and purposeless land (such as cemeteries and bodies of water) from its boundary by encircling that land with another internal set of strings, poles and fences.


3

1) See shulchan Aruch end of Siman 416 that Yom Kippur also requires an Eiruv and it is valid (and we all know that we won't be able to eat it at all on YK!), I think that YK would be a stronger question. 2) In Shulchan Aruch HoRav 386:8 he writes משתתפין אפילו באוכל שאינו ראוי לו אם ראוי לשום אדם מישראל, now since Min Hatorah a child is allowed to eat on ...


3

The Center City [of Philadelphia, Penna.] Eruv includes portions of either side of Interstate 676 and, seemingly, Interstate 95. (Caveat lector: I know nothing about the validity of this eruv.)


3

I think the first step to counter that assumption would be to point out that it's not easy. Erecting it and maintaining it, along with the constant inspections that are necessary, are hard work. I can't claim to be an expert in advanced halacha by any means, but it seems a practical solution to a difficult problem raised by modernity.


3

Many of them in fact had eiruvin. As a side note to a class on Children on Shabbat, Rabbi Tzvi Sobolofsky mentioned that Brisk had one in the days of Rabbi Chaim Soloveitchik. His attitude seemed to be that this was hardly exceptional. While they hardly qualify as shtetlach, Rabbi Herschel Shachter mentioned that both Warsaw and Paris had eiruvin in the ...


3

If you use a back door to a sukkah in the backyard, you may not need one if your yard is basically fenced in. Even if the front of the yard has an opening (like a driveway) you won't need to do anything if: a) the individual opening is less than 10 amos and b) the enclosed length of that side (e.g. the back of the house, the fence) is greater than the ...


2

I would first recommend using as much in place powerlines fences etc as you can. THe less conspicuous the better. My experience has been that 50-75 lbs test fishing wire works great. The fishing lin is non conductive so you dont have to worry about lightning strikes, interference with power lines etc. It is also somewhat stretch which is good for ...


2

I'd think that it parallels the case of a מרפסת (which Rashi, Eruvin 59b, defines as an outdoor corridor onto which several upstairs apartments open, and from which they go down to the courtyard by steps). Shulchan Aruch (Orach Chaim 375:1) cites this description and rules that the people whose apartments open onto the מרפסת have to make an eruv among ...


2

MOre in Depth see here: The New Queens Eiruv


2

The Main underlying Issue is, is Brooklyn and or New York City a Rishus Harabim Doraisia


2

From my notes: עירובין משניות in עירובין – The תנאים were careful to make sure that there were parts of their city where there was no עירוב so it would be אסור to carry in order to make sure that people would not forget that there is an אסור to carry on שבת. מרדכי – Every רב and every Jewish leader should make sure there is an עירוב in his city. תשובות ...


2

I think you need to check any individual string, lechi etc. more often then it would break on average because then you have a chazaka.


2

Ideally, you should check the eruv before every shabbat/day you make use of it. However, there are those who say that if there is no major weather change you can rely on a chazakah. But I believe this is only for eruvin that are hard to check. You really should check every Thursday night or Friday before Shabbat. If it rains or there is a strong wind or ...


2

Most city Eruvin use Matza as the food because it doesn't spoil quickly (Rama OC 368:5). There must be at least 6 (some say 8) eggs' worth of Matza, unless there are less than 18 people in the city in which case there needs to be one dried fig's worth per person (Sh"A OC 368:3). The Matza must belong to everyone. If one person wants to donate Matza to ...


2

An opening is not considered a breach if it is either less or equal to 10 amos or (SA OC 362:9) is set up as an opening with (minimally) 2 posts and a crossbar or as a gated structure (OC 362:11) However, the entire enclosure must not be mostly open (OC 362:9) (with the exception of eiruvei tzuras hapesach, see below) and the walls must be defined (you ...


2

HaMaor Volume 33:3 page 24 - Rabbi Shmuel Singer asks this question and says that since the Rama 471:2 indicates that a minor can eat Matza therefore you can make this Eruv.


1

If the majority of the enclosure is gaps, it is invalid unless each gap is less than 3 tefachim wide. (OC 362:8) If the total amount of wall is greater than or equal to the total amount of gaps, it is kosher provided that there is no gap of more than 10 amot which is not closed using a tzurat hapetach (lit: form of an opening, it is two vertical posts with ...



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