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Presenting a strictly Chareidi point of view on this site is like walking into a minefield, but here goes. There were definitely religious leaders who were against instituting a special day to commemorate the Holocaust, but not all gave their reasoning. One reason that was given came from Rabbi Gedalia Schor as quoted in Meged Givos Olam. The author there ...


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Wikipedia deals with the question: The Chief Rabbinate of Israel, in 1949, under the guidance of Ben-Zion Meir Hai Uziel and Yitzhak HaLevi Herzog, decided that the Tenth of Tevet should be the national remembrance days for victims of the Holocaust. The Tenth of Tevet fast commemorates the siege of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar II. For this day, it ...


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Interesting question and it is true that artscroll's biography of R Moshe Feinstein doesn't address the question explicitly. Here are a few relevant statements showing R Moshe's position. From the statements below I perceive a "positive-neutral attitude", for sure without any virulence against the State but also not proactively recommending alyah. One ...


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I have found Nefesh b' Nefesh's community database to be an excellent resource for this sort of information. Jerusalem is of course a fantastic place in Israel for Torah learning because of the quantity of diversity of opportunities to learn. Ramat Beth Shemesh is more of a city where people live and has less yeshivot and learning places for adults. Two ...


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Mehadrin is a general term, meaning enhanced/ stricter kashrut. People use it to describe a particular standard, or they might mean a general term for one or several hechsherim (kosher supervisions) e.g. Bedatz Eida Chareidis, Rav Landau, Rav Rubin, Sheeris Yisrael, Rav Machpud etc. The term can also be used by a local rabbinate hechsher to denote a higher ...



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