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6

The Soncino has an introduction to a) The Talmud, b) Each Order, c) Each Tractate. You can see most of them here: http://halakhah.com/


6

Look at the introduction of the מאירי to each masechta, where he breaks down the topics of the masechta in general as well as perek by perek. (He also does that in a more perek-specific manner at the beginning of each perek.) While not usually online (and not either in English, which was not specified in the original version of the question), the ...


2

Mechon Mamre has the introduction translated interlinearly though not artscroll-style. Sefaria has a number of chapters (see here for one) translated with the english side-by-side, mostly in Sefer HaMadda. Because the translation is crowd-sourced (though moderated for accuracy) that "number" may be larger by the time you click the link. (full disclosure: I ...


1

No. There isn't really an issue in writing or erasing 'God' See: http://doseofhalacha.blogspot.co.uk/2014/07/god-or-g-d.html There is no issue in writing or printing Hashem’s name properly, providing one knows that it won’t be destroyed. Rambam (Yesodei Hatorah 6:1) writes that there are 7 sheimos (names of Hashem) that mustn’t be erased. There is ...


-2

I can't comment on the other editions, but Rabbi Isadore Grunfeld's translation of Horeb is excellent, as is his (nearly 100 page!) introduction. I consider this sefer a must-read for all Jews, as it is a unique, comprehensive and compelling philosophy of Judaism, as well as a concise summary of all halacha relevant to the life of an observant Jew. The ...


0

Hirsch Chumash - typographically and linguistically, the Feldheim is more legible than the Judaica Press. It was newly translated (the JP version was translated a while ago), so it will make for an easier read than the older version. Nineteen Letters - can be found here for pay (good print) and here for free (older translation, older print; still legible ...


2

SA OC 285:1 States the requirement is 2 times mikra and 1 time Targum. It is clear from the commentaries that Targum means Targum Unkilus. 285:2 allows Rashi, stating the both are done by one who fears Heaven. MB 5 (and Be'er Heiteiv 3) quote the Taz, recomending a good explanatory text such as Tzeiena Ur'ena, to be used in place of Rashi, if the person is ...


1

I doubt there are any extant historical records to the effect, but it certainly seems plausible that in traditionally antisemitic Medieval Christendom, the abbreviation of "Judean" to "Jew" had derogatory undertones similar to other contemporary racial slurs, e.g. for Chinese or Japanese persons. This only seems more so the case considering that the word's ...


3

A synagogue is a Jewish house of prayer. The term refers to both the building and the institution. You'll also hear the Yiddish word shul, which is actually derived from "school" but has come to mean "synagogue". Some liberal Jews also use the word "temple" to refer to a synagogue. Usually it's used as a semi-proper noun, e.g. "are you going to temple ...


0

The term pharisaical as used is insulting in the same way The Merchant of Venice is anti-Semitic. It is a term which developed as and implies a superiority of Christianity over Judaism, and that the latter is morally inferior. This is the original intent of the term. Now, most people use it without really meaning it, they think that these people only ...


8

It is inexact to say that the Pharisees were a "small sect". Most common Jews followed the teachings of the rabbinic Pharisees, as opposed to those of other sects like Sadducees (see Josephus' Antiquities of the Jews 8:10:5,6). Modern talmudic/rabbinic Jews (including most frequent users of this site) consider themselves as following in the tradition of the ...


4

Names often carry within them the intention of the one who speaks and uses them. The word "Jew" can be said in a way which makes it into an insult, or it can be said in a way which carries no emotional baggage. In a scholarly context, the word pharisaical or anything related to it is an important one and is often the springboard in a discussion of ...


9

The term "pharisaical" is offensive to many Jews (me included) because it denigrates some of our most respected rabbis. When Jews think of Pharisees, they think of the sect at the end of the Second Temple period (circa 0 CE) that became the basis for rabbinic Judaism. This group could be contrasted with other parties of the day such as Zealots (who wanted a ...


0

I have never learned with the Koren, but what I have heard is that it is basically just a literal translation of the Gemara text. So if you want the experience of learning the Gemara where you have to figure things out on your own the same way you would without a translation, the Koren seems to be best. But if you want to be able to get pshat right away, the ...



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