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13

I can't speak for the Jewish community generally, but I, for one, do support the use of "Jew" in non-anti-Semitic contexts, consistent with my experience that this is, in fact, a standard use of the term to which Jews do not take offense and my general aversion to unjustified taboos. I have been an English-speaking observant Jew for over three decades now, ...


8

This story is told in Talmud Menachos (44a) about one of R' Chiya's students. The story ends up with them both doing teshuva and subsequently marrying each other. http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/530129/jewish/In-the-Words-of-the-Sages.htm


8

Usually if English-speaking Jews want a translation of the Jewish Bible they'll use a Jewish translation. As for exposure to the other part of "the Bible", i.e. the New Testament, my guess is some Jews who believe in extra exposure will have read bits of it in a survey course or the like. There's a huge range of degrees to which Jews are exposed to general ...


8

Sounds like it could be a case of overregularization of the copula+participle pattern found commonly in Chaza"l to express habituals (e.g. הוי מקבל את כל האדם בסבר פנים יפות). I have no historical basis for showing this spill-over to have occurred. Perhaps it is simply a shortcut for code-switchers using a copula in a more familiar language to bear the ...


8

There are several, sometimes overlapping families of terms in play: Israel This name was given to Abraham's grandson, Jacob, by God and means "God prevails" or "God fights". There's some disagreement over which meaning is accurate, but the source is from this passage in the Torah: And he said unto him: 'What is thy name?' And he said: 'Jacob.' And he ...


7

As stated, Israelite is a anglicized version of a word meaning "of the nation of Israel" which referred to people in biblical and post-biblical times. Once the kingdom split after the reign of Solomon, that term which would have applied to the Northern Kingdom of Israel, would not apply to the Southern Kingdom of Judah. The name "Judah" (transliterated ...


7

There's a translation of Machane Yisrael into English published as English-only (the original Hebrew is not included). It's Machaneh Yisrael (I mean, that's how they spell the title) and the copyright page reads: Authored by Rav Yisrael Meir HaKohen Zt"l The Chofetz Chaim Translated by Machon MEMEY 413 Ashley Ave. • Lakewood, NJ 08701 ...


6

This is a matter of the English language. I found this site which goes through some of the 'rules'. http://www.teachingcollegeenglish.com/2004/02/04/capitalizing-god/ In essennce, a capital first letter implies a 'proper noun', it also implies a bit of 'the one and only'. Capitalizing the word 'He' means 'that "He" which we all know, the one and only.. ...


6

In the Mishpacha magazine, issue 455, 7 Iyar 5773, (April 17, 2013), Mrs. Blima Silverman of Toronto, Ontario, writes (in a letter to the editor), "In your February 20 edition the song, 'Big Gedalia Goomber' was attributed to yet another person who did not write it." She writes further, "The song (both music and lyrics) was composed by my husband, Rabbi ...


6

Like many Anglicized versions of biblical names, the name Balaam comes through the Greek language of the Septuagint, which renders בלעם as βαλααμ. The reason the Septuagint spells it so differently from the Hebrew MT may either be due to limitations of the Greek language to accurately represent Hebrew, changes in the way Greek and/or Hebrew vowels were ...


5

According to Wikipedia and the Jewish Encyclopedia, Reform Judaism, being originally opposed to the idea of Zionism1, called the Hamburg Synagogue "Tempel" to show that they no longer looked forward to the Third Temple in Jerusalem, and that individual, local, temples had taken its place. As DoubleAA points out, none of these sources offer conclusive proof ...


5

There are 876 Reform congregations in North America, 499 of which have "Temple" in their names, so the formal name is pretty common and it's not unreasonable to think that people refer to the others as "temples" too. As noted by DoubleAA, the first (apparent) use of the name was the Hamburg synagogue in 1818. Documentation about naming practices that early ...


5

Do English-speaking Jews read the Bible in English, or is that too Christian for them? First, English is not a Christian language. If anything, it's a pagan language, but really it's just a language. There are many translations of the Bible into English. Most are explicitly Christian. A handful are scholarly works (e.g., Everett Fox's translation). ...


5

Echoing others, the answer to this question is elusive and is likely to remain so: We are beset by many problems. And our thorniest and perhaps most disabling problem is, curiously, an "identity crisis"--perhaps a sign of our youthfulness as an ideological movement. Objectively examined, what binds us together as a separate entity is our full ...


4

The short answer is: we don't know. The word Temple was first introduced in the title of the organazation which drove to found the Hamburg Temple: The New Isaelite Temple Association of Hamburg, a group of 66 layman (not the leading Reform Rabbis of the time) which arranged for the opening of the Hamburg Temple in 1818. You can read in The Jew in the Modern ...


4

"Jew" does not need to be rehabilitated. It is perfectly normal for Jews to use the word, and I find it quite jarring when I hear other words used instead. The fact that some antisemitic websites use the word in a derogatory sense is irrelevant to the fact that it is our name. However, as Isaac noted, when it is used as an adjective, instead of "Jewish", it ...


4

The names of Hashem which may not be erased are listed in Shulchan Oruch Yoreh Daioh 276 (9). Hashem is not one of them and so the hyphenated ("Hash-m") seems unnecessary.


4

The Brisker Derech: A Practical Guide by Moshe Wachtfogel goes through practical applications of the Brisker approach. It seems to be published by Feldheim, but I could not find it on their site. I have not read through this work, but a cursory look inside prompted me to purchase this book for a friend. I purchased it at a local book store.


4

Check out the Nefesh B'Nefesh Community Database which lets you search according to a number of criteria. Off the top of my head (and if you're sure Ramat Beit Shemesh is out), from the information you give you might want to look into Yad Binyamin, Modiin, Moshav Matisyahu, Nof Ayalon, Efrat/Alon Shvut/Neve Daniel


4

The first two can be used interchangeably, although the use "Israelite" is slightly antiquated now, and is used mostly to refer to the Children of Israel in biblical times. Nowadays, the only term of those three that are used to refer to Jews is, "Jew" As far as Judaizer, I have come across the term before, but I had to look it up, because it's so uncommon. ...


4

Many people are careful not to say a translation of one of G-d's 7 holy names (see here for the Rambam's version of them). G-d is a translation of either A-D-N-Y or Y-H-V-H, depending on who you ask. This is why many people use the word Hashem ("The Name") in Hebrew, or Aibishter ("One Above") in Yiddish. See this article, which says that R' Moshe ...


4

The Shach (Yoreh De'ah 179:11) ruled that "God" spelled in a foreign language does NOT have the status of a "shem" and thus may be erased, lehatkhila. For more information, you can read this article: http://www.shamash.org/lists/scj-faq/HTML/faq/11-03-01.html Source: http://judaism.stackexchange.com/a/15351/3


4

Wikipedia. As described there, Neusner has been criticized by the following scholars in his field of study: [Shaye J. D. Cohen, "Jacob Neusner, Mishnah and Counter-Rabbinics," Conservative Judaism, Vol.37(1) Fall 1983 p. 48-63] [Craig A. Evans, "Mishna and Messiah 'In Context'," Journal of Biblical Literature, (JBL), 112/2 1993, p. 267-289] ...


3

As @DoubleAA said in the comment, Meilah is only 22 pages. The next Talmidic Tractate is Tamid. You can find the PDF here: http://www.halakhah.com/pdf/kodoshim/Tamid.pdf Notice that the page numbering does not restart at 2A, but rather starts at 25B. As @Alex noted in his comment, in between Meila and Tamid are the Mishnayot (with no Talmudic Commentary) ...


3

Mashal= Parable. It is a story or comparison for the sake of conveying a deeper truth. Nimshal= Technically it means moral. It is the deeper truth being hinted at in the story. For instance in Aesop's fables, like the tortoise and the hare, in which a bullying hare is challenged to a race by a tortoise. The hare takes off, and confident of victory ...


3

Adam Mintz has written a fine essay called The Talmud in Translation, in which he elaborates on the history of the Artscroll, Steinsaltz, and Soncino Talmuds and the various polemics concerning each. Regarding "rejections," there have been critiques for each Talmud. On the Soncino, there was a little controversy that concerned making the Talmud ...


3

I've never heard any objection to Soncino specifically. I've heard objection to translated editions generally — and the very explicatory ArtScroll English edition especially — from teachers: namely, that these editions make it too easy for students to make their way through the g'mara, and the student loses out on the benefits (spiritual and pedagogical) of ...


3

You can find a translation by Jacob Neusner online here. It should be noted that the quality of his translations is a rather controversial subject in academic circles. That said, to the best of my knowledge his is currently the only complete translation of the Yerushalmi into English. Note that instead of the pagination of the Vilna Bavli (21 folios) ...


2

According to this article the cheer has anti-semitic origins. It developed from a war-cry meaning “Jerusalem is fallen” - in Latin Hieroslyma est perdita .


2

Israelite is the term for the nation of Israel in ancient times as depicted in the Bible. Jew is the modern term for practitioners of Judaism. It would be anachronistic to describe the ancients as 'Jews' or modern members of Judaism 'Israelites'. I have never heard the phrase 'judaizer' before.



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