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12

There are nine possible reasons not to use Eletricity on Shabbat Opinions about eletricty range from deorita, d'rabanan and technially, not really an issur. The two most commonly cited sources on the topic are the Chazon Ish and R. Auerbach who's opinions on this vary greatly. Igniting a fire The basic example of using eletricity, (turning on an ...


9

The Shach (Yoreh De'ah 179:11) ruled that "God" spelled in a foreign language does NOT have the status of a "shem" and thus may be erased, lehatkhila. For more information, you can read this article: http://www.shamash.org/lists/scj-faq/HTML/faq/11-03-01.html


8

I recall having learned in the beginning of the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch that one may not recite gods name in any language when not needed. I suppose the spelling of G-d is an extension of the same idea to writing. In general. I have a problem with this approach. It seems to me that the term "god" is no different than "Hashem". In fact spelled with a ...


5

In terms of deriving benefit from the actions done by a Jew on Shabbat the Shulchan Aruch (OC 318:1 and Mishna Berurah and Biur Halacha there) distinguish between a number of cases: If a biblical prohibition was violated purposefully (deoraita bemeizid) then no one can derive benefit from it for the rest of shabbat, and the violator himself cannot derive ...


5

Per Rabbi Eli Monsour based on Rabbi Ovadya Yosef in Halichos Olam 4:137 One may not ask a gentile to turn on one's oven or stove to heat food on Shabbat, even if he will otherwise have no hot food for his Shabbat meal. If a non-Jew does turn on the appliance to heat the food, one may not partake of the food until after it once again cools, and ...


5

I found a discussion of possible problems, the writer seems not to like the idea, though doesn't rule it out completely. Issues that are addressed there (my comments in parentheses): Holding something valuable during Davenning is prohibited since the possibility of it falling bothers כוונה. (A Siddur is permitted, I woudn't assume a difference since ...


4

Unfortunately video games are out on Shabbos, as we are not permitted to manipulate electricity. "Working" on Shabbos is not defined by what we achieve, but rather what is defined in the Shulchan Aruch (Jewish Code of Law) as "work". (For example, the Talmud states that one can carry heavy loads around the house all day and not desecrate Shabbos, but ...


4

To make a circuit it must be a complete circuit, i.e. a full unbroken circle. If there is no bulb then you did not make a complete circuit, since the bulb is part of that circle. This seems to be a science question, not a halachik one. Personally I tape down the switch because modern fridges do other functions besides turn on a light. Fancier fridges will ...


3

The problem occurred to me when I was visiting Japan. I went to the manager of the hotel on Friday and explained the issues. He directed me to one of the non-electronic doors which he would leave open over a generous time window when I expected to be coming in and out. This also worked in another smaller hotel in Japan where we used the staff entrance on ...


3

If the charger has an indicator light it would obviously be forbidden as unplugging would extinguish it. Even if not, phone chargers utilize electricity even when the phone is not plugged in. Consequently unplugging would interrupt the flow of electricity and would most probably be forbidden on Shabbos under the general minhag/uvdin dechol prohibition of ...


3

In Shmirat Shabbat K'Hilchato in 13:32 he discusses using a dimmer - and permits it, though he recommends covering/taping up the switch. In the footnote (112) he says that since light bulbs do not flicker, there's no issue with "fixing the wick". He has some sources there which I did not follow up on. It would seem that he would not allow the use of ...


3

Rav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach (Meoray Eish and Minchas Shlomo 14) sides that technically as far as the laws of Muktzah are concerned it is permitted. However in a footnote he writes "All what I have written is only a discussion and not to be relied on, for all of Israel refrained all these years from moving an electric light on Shabbos and it appears as uvdin ...


3

From http://vbm-torah.org/archive/halak64/23shabbat%20candles.doc‎ Can one fulfill one's obligation to light using electric lights? This issue hinges on whether the original takana limited lighting to a specific list of wicks and fuel. From the mishna in Shabbat 20b, one might get that impression. Many poskim, however, did not seem to see this as a ...


3

From Torah.org I glean that: Teshuvos Beis Yitzchak Yorah Daiya 120; Machaze Avraham 41; Melamed Leho'il 47; Harav Y.Y. Henkin (Eidus l'Yisrael, pg. 122) hold that it is permissible to use electricity for Shabbos candles and the proper blessing may be recited. Teshuvos Levushei Mordechai Orach Chaim 3:59; Maharshag 2:107; Pekudas Elazer 22; Tchebiner ...


3

Being that no action is done, the question here is not a question of whether one would be transgressing a prohibition, but rather whether one would be permitted to derive benefit from the items which were affected by an apparent violation (הנאה). In a broad sense, the halachot of deriving benefit from a transgression are fairly clear (see Shulchan Aruch 276 ...


3

Reb Moshe Feinstein (O.C. 4 Siman 74 Dinei Bishul 38) and Reb Shlomo Zalman Auerbach (Shmiras Shabbos Kehilchasa 1:69) say that returning to a different blech is Muttar (not in a case of powercut). The Orchos Shabbos 2:50 says that the same Din applies to a powercut. His proof is from the Chazon Ish 38:2 that says a person is allowed to place a fully cooked ...


2

Reasons to prohibit: Electrical generation in Israel involves a Jew doing melacha on Shabbat, and since it is forbidden to benefit from such work, one shouldn't use electricity from the public utilities on Shabbat. Reasons to permit: Electricity is required to power hospitals and other life-saving functions. Therefore, it is permitted for Jews to generate ...


1

He writes explicitly that he's not sure whether extinguishing an electric appliance is forbidden mid'oraysa, and uses that doubt as grounds, when combined with certain other grounds, to permit doing so. (Orach Chayim 3 #42.)


1

All pancakes which can be cooked by heated plate are permitted, and those that require switching on plate are forbidden if the plate was switched on by a gentile. This answer was provided by a rabbi on http://www.pocketrabbi.com, a user friendly system for a quick response to halachic or any torah questions that a Jew might have.


1

See Rabbi Torczyner's lecture on attending conferences. If I understood and recall his lecture correctly, generally speaking, where necessary it would be permissible, assuming that the speaker would be using the same electronic devices regardless of your presence. (Rabbi Torczyner always starts with "ask your local synagogue rabbi for actual psak", of ...


1

To answer the latter part of your question, let us first leave aside whether or not throwing a switch in and of itself is a matter of Boneh. The Chazon Ish clearly held that it was, however that position is contested both from a halakhic as well as scientific standpoint. However you asked what do people do who pasken like the Chazon Ish. For the Chazon ...


1

For k'tiva, I thought there were two basic categories: 1) H's primary names, in Hebrew 2) Kinnuim, i.e. nicknames, like "Shalom" in Hebrew, or "God" in English. Since G-d would seem to have the same level of nicknamedness as God, there shouldn't be a halakhic difference in actual writing. Perhaps G-d would be more appropriate in typing, where it sounds like ...



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