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An earlier Jewish source is found in the writings of the Arizal in a sefer called Otzrot Chaim. In Shaar Hanekudim pereck aleph page 5 (amud aleph) [in the old editions]. The Arizal mentions the Bat Yana gazing at its egg to hatch it. The minhag of hanging it in shul though is not mentioned.


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I could not locate any source that discusses the salt to water ratio. the idea behind the salt water is that it symbolizes the tears that the Israelites shed from the suffering of the hard work. If you wanted to adhere to this symbolism, I guess the amount of salt should be equivalent to the saline concentration of human tears. I'm no chemist, so I have no ...


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Sefer Hatodaa page 98 mentions that there are those that do so and those that do not. My families Minhag, which I have never seen or heard of elsewhere is to make egg soup. This is done by mashing the yellow part of the egg into hot water. Then cutting up the white part of the egg into small pieces, adding scallions, black pepper and salt. This is done ...


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since rama in 575 says we do not salt the matza on seder night we need to fulfill the custom of always having salt on the table. al kol karbanecha takriv melach. since the egg represents the korban chagigah this would be the appropriate time.


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The Magain Avraham (O.C. 156) quoting the Yam Shel Shlomo says that it is to not say something disgusting (and it should be said in general, not specifically about the Mesechta name). The Teferes Yisroel (beginning of the Meschta) doesn't like that explanation and suggest instead it is to avoid confusing it with the word בצע which caused a mistake in ...


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1) The reason I have heard is that it is a matter of etiquette. בצים is a Hebrew euphemism for testicles, so some people, especially chasidim, are careful to use the Aramaic word for egg instead. 2) No, because the Aramaic word for egg is ביעא with a silent yud.



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