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16

Chulin 8 / Yoreh Deah 87:3 - Rabbi Akiva holds that the prohibition of eating chicken with milk is Rabinnic (M'Drabanan) - the reason is to avoid confusion as people consider chicken meat. Fish would not be confused as it does not require slaughtering, however chicken does require slaughtering. Once eggs are laid they are completely developed; and they ...


16

To your last point, traditional caviar comes from sturgeon fish, which are not kosher. Eggs from kosher fish, such as whitefish, are kosher, so you can find kosher-certified "caviar" made of such eggs.


14

Mishna B'rura 476:11 and Taame Haminhagim 513 say that one should eat it.


10

These eggs are cooked by boilers that run constantly. The OU ensures that when the boiler needs to be restarted, it is done with a Mashgiach. Source: I heard it from a Rabbi who asked the OU and got that answer. Of course we may not be talking about the same company, but the point being that the OU requires the Bishul Yisroel and makes arrangements for it. ...


9

You seem to be looking for the Bar Yuchnei. Talmud Bechoros 56b: פעם אחת נפלה ביצת בר יוכני וטבעה ששים כרכים ושברה שלש מאות ארזים Once the Bar Yuchnei's egg fell and it flooded sixty cities and destroyed three hundred cedars. The gemara there says that normally this wouldn't happen, but this particular egg was rotten so the bird threw it away. It ...


9

The Magain Avraham (O.C. 156) quoting the Yam Shel Shlomo says that it is to not say something disgusting (and it should be said in general, not specifically about the Mesechta name). The Teferes Yisroel (beginning of the Meschta) doesn't like that explanation and suggest instead it is to avoid confusing it with the word בצע which caused a mistake in ...


8

I actually have heard of this minhag before, although I have never seen an ostrich egg in a synagogue myself. It was a fairly common symbol in both Christianity and Islam, and so churches and mosques would frequently have ostrich eggs in them as well (see this book, for example). The symbolism is largely what has been mentioned above with regard to the (...


8

The Shevet Halevi, Vol. 10:133, was asked this question and he says that if one buys eggs which turn out to have blood spots it should be considered a מקח טעות (a mistaken purchase), but the custom is not to consider it a מקח טעות because it is impossible to determine the nature of the eggs before they are sold. And if one borrowed eggs and some of them had ...


7

The Shulchan Aruch (OC 473:4) says that the custom around him was to cook the egg in liquid. The Mishna Berura there explains that this is because the egg represents the Korban Chagigah which, unlike the Korban Pesach, could be either roasted or cooked in liquid. The Rama there notes that the custom in his city is to have the egg roasted, as was certainly a ...


7

The Shulchan Aruch Harav says that one eats eggs to remind him to mourn the Beis Hamikdash, since had the Beis Hamikdash stood, we would have been eating the korban Pesach.


7

Despite it's apparent similarity to pagan practices dating back thousands of years, this custom exists in some communities (particularly among Lubavitchers and some other Chassidic groups) and dates back at least several decades. Similar customs (such as eating colored eggs on Purim) existed in Jewish communities in Afghanistan and Yemen, and women in ...


6

The Remah (Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 476:2) says that some people have the custom to eat eggs at the Seder, as a sign/remembrance of mourning. He posits two reasons: The first night of Pesach is always the same day of the week as Tisha Be'av To remember the destruction of the Temple. Where it not for the destruction we would be eating the Korban Pesach. ...


6

The Taz (OC 473:4) suggests the reason is so that we can eat it, because it is forbidden to eat roasted meat on the Seder night. The Mishna Berura (:23) quotes two other reasons. First, that we use an egg, which is commonly served at a meal to mourners, to represent our mourning the loss of the Beit HaMikdash and the Korbanot. Second, the word for egg in ...


5

It is Fleishig. Egg shells are porous. And even if it is not, pots become fleishig so why should this be different?


5

In answer to your question, according to this article from OU, no: There is no problem with eating eggs cooked in the shell (boiled or roasted), even though these cannot be checked. However, note that this would only apply to non-fertilized eggs (as are commonly available today). If you're dealing with fertile eggs (usually available at a premium), ...


5

There is a responsa of the Ben Ish Hai brought in the fourth volume of the set published by Ahavat Shalom, that says it must be for the sake of taking the eggs(or young) on account of Tzarat Ba'alei Haim, as the mother may not return and you would thus be the cause of the starvation of the young.


4

Who said we don't treat fish eggs the same way? You can certainly buy OU-certified black caviar (from whitefish, for instance, see: http://www.amazon.com/Kosher-Black-Whitefish-Caviar-Orthodox/dp/B000LR0MHI) So it follows the same rules as all of the items you mentioned -- as long as it was supervised when it was extracted to make sure it came from a kosher ...


4

The Encyclopedia Yehudit suggests the salt water is for the following reasons, though I don't know what the source is for what is written there or if the suggestion offered is their own. This does relate to the reason given for the egg as having to do with the destruction of the Beis HaMikdash - : Salt water symbolizes the tears that were wept over the ...


4

The answer to this is no. such an egg is not kosher as can be seen from Kosher Eggs The prohibition of eating blood applies even to the smallest drop of blood, and thus any blood spots found in an egg renders the egg non-kosher. Each egg should be opened into a clear dish or glass and checked for blood spots before it is cooked or combined ...


4

First of all raw eggs do not need a hechsher according to CRC, Denver Vaad HaKashrut and others. The presence of a hechsher on the box does not appear to be a factor in two major treatments of the topic. In a discussion on blood in eggs, the OU explains that, due to modern production methods, any blood spot found in eggs will never develop into an embryo ...


3

The Etz Chaim Synagogue in Chania, Crete has ostrich eggs hanging from its main chandelier.


3

The Shulchan Aruch Harav says that the egg should be either cooked or fried. Nonetheless, the footnote quotes Sefer Haminhagim that in Chabad, the egg is hard-boiled and eaten with salt-water.


3

Well, as Fred's excellent answer over at the other question demonstrates, it is fairly well-established that several different Jewish communities had a custom to dye or colour eggs for various holidays, including Purim, Pesah, and Lag baOmer, in both the Mizrahi world (Yemen, Afghanistan and Kurdistan) and the Ashkenazi world (Hassidic and shtetl customs). I'...


3

Rabbi Avraham Yosef says it is permitted L'chatchila to buy eggs on Pesach.


3

This is the response I received to my query from the OU. Dear Gershon, Thank you for contacting the OU. They are bishul yisroel. Please do not hesitate to contact us again should you have any further questions. Sincerely, The Web(be) Rebbe Orthodox Union Kashruth Division So there is no Bishul Akum Heter being used with supervised hard ...


3

As observed in the comments -- egg farmers "candle" an egg by shining a bright light through it to check for blood spots. This works better with white eggs, which are more translucent than brown ones. So if you buy a dozen white eggs at the store, it's more likely they caught the blood spots at the factory and they didn't make it to the shelf. In short -- ...


2

This is a big dispute between halachists who are more rationalist vs. those who are more mystically oriented. According to 'rationalists', who view it as an act of mercy, if you don't need the eggs / chicks, then it is an act of cruelty, for no reason, so of course you should not chase away the mother bird. Ones who hold like this include Rokeach, Meiri, ...


2

You don't have to. In fact, it is impossible to do so since after cooking, the blood can get mixed up and not be noticeable. Since it is impossible to check, we rely on the rov (majority) or eggs that are not bloody. Source: here


2

http://www.kehillastorah.org/practical-teves-5760.html If you find a blood spot in a hard boiled egg does that affect the other eggs boiled with it in the pot? If there were 3 or more eggs cooked with it in the pot then there is no problem with the other eggs [because of the concept of 'batleh b'rov' (nullified in the majority)]. If there were ...


2

Like Dave, I also did a little bit of internet searching. The only thing I could find out about religious symbolism was Christian symbolism. Also, it's generally (in most Christian symbology that I've found) seen as very negative - the ostrich is the symbol of the bad mother for not sitting on the eggs. Speculation: Maybe it was discontinued when people ...



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