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Yes there is a special reason for Jews not to eat at an idolator's house even if the food is completely Kosher. This however is only binding when the idolator has invited the Jew to his house, or there was an assumed invitation. This is a law in the Talmud as seen here which expounds a passage in Exodus. Here is the relevant discussion starting from a ...


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There is a prohibition of food cooked by a gentile (bishul Akum) and bread of a gentile (Pas Akum) in order to prevent mingling that can lead to intermarriage. These laws are similar but have differences in the details. Similarly the issur of stam yaynam (wine touched or moved by a gentile) is similar to these halachos. The chachamim stated that all of these ...


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The answer is directly drawn from Gemara. Gemara Berachot 23b: אמר רבי יצחק: הנכנס לסעודת קבע - חולץ תפיליו ואחר כך נכנס.‏ R`Isaac said: One who wishes to [partake of] a regular meal should take off his tefillin and then go in {since it may become drunk and will demean himself with Tefilin. Rashi}. ופליגא דרבי חייא, דאמר רבי חייא: מניחן על ...


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Seudat Keva is forbidden, but Arai is allowed. Coffee is usually drunk as a Keva meal, a permanent meal, so in that case i think it would be forbidden, but then again if it is a part of some kiddush after Tefillah, and one is still wearing his Tefillin, in my opinion it's considered Arai, and is allowed. והשם יראה ללבב. Consequently, light drinks, such as ...


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R. Belsky was asked "How much must one lean for proper heseiba, 10 degrees, 45 degrees, or 90 degrees?" He answered that heseiba does not refer to awkward lateral leaning. He notes that he recounted that he saw a tapestry depicting heseiba and realized that the act refers not to awkward leaning, but to comfortable reclining. He demonstrated how this can be ...



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