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14

The Artscroll siddur has a short example on each one. Here are the examples given: Kal Vachomer - If a lenient case has a stringency, a stringent case should have a stringency. An example would be if on Yom-Tov one cannot pick an apple (even though one can generally do melachos that involve food-preparations) all the more so on Shabbos. Gzeira Shava - A ...


7

Because the specific cases do teach us something about the scope of the general statement. In this example, the Mishnah (Bava Metzia 27a) points out that a garment has unique identifying marks (simanim) and an owner who is looking for it (tov'im), and that this therefore delimits "any lost object of your brother": it has to be returned only if it has these ...


7

The Mishna in Taanis 4:8 tells us that when it says in Shir Hashirim 3:11 "The day of our wedding" it refers to the giving of the Torah, i.e Shavuot. (Rashi on Shir Hashirim 3:11 says it as well.) Once we've established that there is a connection between the giving of the Torah and Marriage, this opens us up for a lot of divre torah, connecting the two. ...


5

A few answers are given first the Pardes Yosef in Parshas Breisheis. He says that alot of the arguments couples have are about the Bride and groom thinking that they come from a better family, hence it leads to arguments so here we Bless them as in The Garden Of Eden you where both were created By G-d nothing to argue about!!! A second answer is offered by ...


5

The Torah spells out (Lev. 23:32) that Yom Kippur begins בתשעה לחדש בערב, in the evening of 9 Tishrei, and that it runs מערב עד ערב, from evening to evening. As explained by the Gemara, Rosh Hashanah 9a, the words בתשעה לחדש בערב teach us that מוסיפין מחול על הקדש - we have to start Yom Kippur a little earlier than sunset and end it a little after ...


5

It's called שערי צבי - "Shaarey Tzvi" written by Rav Tzvi Rotter shlit"a (he is the son of the Shaaray Aharon). The book can be found here and can be partially viewed here. Hat tip to sam regarding another book with the same premise, ילקוט מלכו של עולם - "Yalkut Malko Shel Olam", information about it can be found here.


5

I don't know where you can find it in English, but if your question is where can you find good, clean examples that everyone can agree about, I think by far the most authoritative place to look is in the original source of the 13 rules. Rebbi Yishmael's Brayta, as it is called, is actually the introduction to the Sifra, the Tannaitic Halachik Midrash on ...


4

Here is a series of classes by Immanuel Shochet on R' Yishmoel's 13 principles. There are handouts for each class as well. I haven't gone through this series yet, but it's in my queue. I'm hoping it will have good examples of each of the 13 principles. I just saw where the Abudraham brings examples and explanations for each of the thirteen principles.


4

The Beer Mayim Chaim Answers: If you take the word סלע and write it with all it letters spelled out (this is a Kabbalistic system) out you get. ס*מ*ך ל*מ*ד ע*י*ן Now ,we can understand why it says וְדִבַּרְתֶּם אֶל הַסֶּלַע לְעֵינֵיהֶם וְנָתַן מֵימָיו Because in middle of the word סלע you have the word מים. This also explains why he had to hit it twice ...


4

Rashi (TB Kesuvos 8A, s.v. M'sameah Hasan V'chalah, toward the end) says that the point of this blessing is wishing the couple success and happiness in worldly things such as parnassah (making a living) etc. the same way Hashem gave happiness to Adam in the Garden of Eden of old. If that is the case then according to Rashi, it is referring to how Hashem ...


4

The Gemara (Sotah 13b) says that it parallels Moshe's statement to Korach and his group, "רַב לָכֶם בְּנֵי לֵוִי". In return, he was told "רַב לָךְ". Maharal, in Chiddushei Aggados, explains that Moshe was, in effect, telling them, "The greatness that you have ought to be enough for you - you shall not have any more." Which is a degrading way to talk to ...


3

I suspect you are referring to the famous teaching of Rabbi Eliezer the son of Rabbi Yosi HaGlili that enumerates 32 middos (principles) for interpreting the Torah. A detailed discussion of these 32 principles can be found in the back of Tractate Brachos in standard editions of the Vilna Shas, a few pages after the Mevoh HaTalmud.


3

Rashi indicates that a Tzadik does not make requests based on their merits. Perhaps the explanation of Rashi is that a Tzadik truly recognizes that any merit he might have before God is really as nothing. If one truly perceives the reality of God and recognizes how lowly man is, as is said " Mah enosh Ki ziskerenu?" What is man but nothing before God, he ...


3

The Maharsha answers that first they stoned him a little then they put a little wick in his mouth again not to the extent of death, they choked him almost until death and finally they chopped off his head killing him, thereby getting a bit of all the Deaths of Beis Din. The Shevus Yackov has a more an interesting answer. He claims is that Billam with his ...


3

Rashi on the verse (Bamidbar 20:11) says that Moshe had to hit it twice, since the first time only drops of water came out. Rashi then explains that drops only came out the first time since Moshe was not supposed to hit the rock, but rather talk to it.


3

In Sippurei Chassidim (by R' S.Y. Zevin), he brings a story the point of which is that Hashem's desire is that even the person's "heel" - the lowest, crassest, most insensitive part of the body (as the Yiddish expression "Ich her dir mit mayn pyate" - "I hear you with my heel" - i.e., "I am paying absolutely no attention to what you're saying") should be ...


3

The cantillation notes break the directions into pairs: "West-and-North", and "South-and-East." If I understand correctly, Moses is standing approximately across the Jordan River from Jericho. If he looks West, he sees the Promised Land. Same if he looks North, according to the Biblical cartographers who have the Biblical northern border jutting east near ...


2

Interesting question! I think there is definitely a midrashic connection (whereas an etymological connection would exist not for Ye'or-or, but probably for nahar-nahara). Melila Hellner-Eshed's phenomenal book "A River Flows from Eden" explores the significance of that verse (Genesis 2:10) in Qabbalistic thought, and discusses throughout her book the ...


2

I didn't spend too much time on this, but off the cuff: Without the reasoning of "nesachim is fruit juice and cannot come to chimutz", I could have said the R"Y haGelili and R"A are adding only one item- whichever is the lesser chidush to include. The statement of reasoning shows that the machlokes is not over which one is the simplest to include, but ...


2

The question is simple Moshe wants to go into Eretz Yisroel so he wants to stay in Hashem's servitude but the answer Hashem replies can only be understood in the context of the Gemara in Kiddushin (כב, א) there the Gemara explains that in order to enslave himself further he must make this statement twice. Therefore Hashem tells him do not continue to speak ...



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