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28

I think your answer was exactly correct. Simply speaking, your religion doesn't permit you to engage in this activity. The fact that other people, who claim to follow the same religion, do engage in that activity, well, you'll have to ask them about that. You should not get into a discussion about the other person's level of observance. You can talk about ...


21

Thank you for your sensitivity in asking this question. As pointed out in comments, you are actually Jewish (whether you follow Judaism or not). But as you say in your question, you've been raised with Christianity and it doesn't appear that you've rejected that. You see Judaism as part of your cultural background, if I'm reading you correctly, the way ...


18

This practice seems to be (at least) as old as the Gemara, as the Gemara states in Brachos 27b: 'R. Yirmiah b. Abba is different, because he was a disciple-colleague. [This can be proven by the fact that] R. Jeremiah b. Abba said to Rav: Have you made havdalah? He replied: Yes, I have; and he did not say to him, has the master made havdalah' In ...


16

In the Shul I daven in the Gabbai's father Davens there often and the Rav told him to call him up Yaamod Avi Mori. I found that Sefer Dinei Kriyas HaTorah - Rabbi Naftali Hoffner says that you should call the father up as Yaamod Avi U'Mori........


14

The Shu"t Beit Avi (5:56) was asked this question and concludes that one should call him up as "Abba Isaac ben Moses" (for example). He says that by using the honorific "Abba" one alleviates the issue of calling one's parent by their first name (outlined in Shulchan Aruch YD 240:2). He notes that even though the Shulchan Aruch sounds like it is forbidden to ...


12

I have seen some shuls that actually have people sign a formalized contract not to talk during davening and then post that near the entrance to the shul. I think that whatever the approach, the most successful way would be to get wide-spread buy in from everyone first. Any approach that singles people out, even with halachic basis, will have a hard time ...


12

I once visited the Kemp Mill Synagogue and IF I REMEMBER CORRECTLY this was the deal they had made: the congregartion agreed not to talk at all during services, and in return the Rabbi agreed to give his sermon after all the prayers had ended (ie after mussaf), thus allowing for those who did not want to stay for the sermon to leave. The vast majority of ...


11

May I call you user1208? There are 2 questions there: Am I allowed to interrupt in such a circumstance? (Yes) If I do interrupt (legally or illegally), does that require me to wash again? (No) Even when we have strict standards for interrupting between related brachos, like birchos krias shema, we pasken like Rabbi Yehuda in Brachos 2:1- ובפרקים שואל ...


11

Very conveniently, the answer lies plainly in one verse. VaYikra (Leviticus) 19:17 states, "Do not hate your brother in your heart; you surely must rebuke your neighbor, but you must not bear sin because of him." (My own translation) Rashi there states: "but You shall not bear a sin on his account: I.e., [in the course of your rebuking your fellow,] do not ...


10

Who is your Rebbe? Which chasidus are you? Where do you daven?


10

This g'mara says one should not enter anyone's home suddenly (relevant bold part translated): ת"ר: שבעה דברים צוה ר"ע את רבי יהושע בנו: "בני', אל תשב בגובהה של עיר ותשנה ואל תדור בעיר שראשיה תלמידי חכמים ואל תכנס לביתך פתאום כ"ש לבית חבירך ואל תמנע מנעלים מרגליך השכם ואכול בקיץ מפני החמה ובחורף "מפני הצינה ועשה שבתך חול ואל תצטרך לבריות והוי משתדל עם ...


10

Assuming it was your father's Mother's Mother or some combination thereof who was Jewish, then it might be best for you to find a Large cross with a small Jewish star. The Jewelry you currently have has strong associations with "Messianic Jews", or "Jews for Jesus", both groups which are roundly rejected by Jewish groups as being either an oximoron or ...


10

Thanks to Reddit user Bar Kappara (by way of @Isaac Moses) for this answer: Devarim Rabba 3:3: It is told of Rabbi Shimon ben Shetach that he once purchased an ass from an Ishmaelite. When his disciples came, they found a jewel suspended from its neck and said, "Master, 'The blessing of Hashem, it makes rich.'" [Proverbs 10:22] Rabbi Simon ben Shetach ...


10

I think every situation is different depending on the nature of the friendship between the chavrusas and how sensitive the person is. But I will tell you some things that I have seen done: I had a friend breaking up with a very sensitive chavrusa. He (my friend) happens to be a very funny guy. One day, with as much obviously fake pomp as he could muster, ...


9

Shulchan Aruch HaRav 92:7 says that one should not touch the Tzoas Ha'Af during Tefila only through a handkerchief (Beged). This would indicate to me that there is no prohibition against picking a nose, since if was prohibited outright then why would it be mentioned as prohibited by Tefila. Regarding Shabbos - I have heard that HaRav Ovadia Yosef Shlita has ...


9

The only thing that would be offensive is if you posed as accepting the Jewish faith and then went around telling everyone that they have to believe in Jesus.


8

The Gemara in Nida 16b says that entering without informing someone is an act that Hashem hates (even in one's own house).


8

Always assume the person is shomer nagiah until they give you a hand, or you see them touch another person who isn't their spouse. I do this even with non-Jews, because you never know if they don't like to be touched or don't like to touch people. http://isitnormal.com/story/i-dont-like-to-be-touched-29913/ From this summary of the research of touching: ...


8

I would suggest that it probably reflects the beliefs of some messianic Christians who call themselves Jews (and some who are technically Jewish by the Jewish standard of matrilineal descent), and I would interpret it to mean that you are of that ilk. Many Jews (and I count myself among them) do not have any nice thoughts towards these groups, to put it ...


8

In this shiur by Rabbi Yonason Roodyn (17:26) he quotes the Rif that can be taken to mean that there is an obligation for gentiles to cover their heads in a synagogue.


8

Chavos Yair (152) discusses a number of these cases. In some of them, he says, the person delivering the insulting remark is the other one's teacher; the halachah is indeed that if a teacher sees that his students aren't applying themselves properly to their studies, he should "get angry at them and insult them verbally" to spur them to correct behavior ...


8

The Gemara (Shabbos 12a) says: ת"ר אין פולין ברה"ר מפני הכבוד כיוצא בו אמר (רב) יהודה ואמרי לה רבי נחמיה אין עושין אפיקטויזין ברה"ר מפני הכבוד Our Rabbis taught: One must not pick [lice from his garments] in the street out of decency. In like way R. Judah-others state, R. Nehemiah-said: One must not cause himself to vomit in the street, out ...


7

I think your response was correct, and agree also with @LazerA's elaboration on it. There is one thing that I would sometimes add, depending on context (and probably would not apply for you anyway) - I admit that in some circumstances, I do not know enough of the details - whether it be of the way the kitchen is run (as @Will mentioned) or more often ...


7

The Talmud discusses this issue in Pesachim 3a. There it brings a number of instances where a verse uses extra letters to avoid saying a negative word. Here's one example that it brings: The verse by Noach (Genesis 7:8) says to bring into the ark animals that are טהורה (pure) and animals that are אשר איננה טהורה (lit. that are not pure). This is instead of ...


7

There is no actual halakhic obligation for even a Jew to wear a kipa. The brakha in the morning (which is to be recited upon doing the action) "`oter Yisrael batifara" is recited upon wrapping a turban. See Mishne Torah hilkhoth tefilla pereq zen. Over time in Ashkenazi galut, various customs changed and wearing a kipa became the accepted practice. This is ...


7

Rabbi Ari Enkin (in the article "Disgusting Behavior") rules not to pick your nose in public. (Though his source is Chagigah 5a, which says a person is judged for doing something disgusting by which his friend is disgusted, and it doesn't single out picking your nose.)


6

I heard live from HaGaon HaRav Yis'haq Yosef Shelita (author of Yalkut Yosef) that it is Mutar. He also said candies are Mutar in the bathroom.


6

The Lubavitcher Rebbe zt"l mentioned this idea in one of his talks (Shabbos Chanukah 5734 - Sichos Kodesh 5734 1:211-212, adapted into English by others). He also adds that it wasn't just that Yosef noticed that they were upset - they probably were on all the other days too, having been demoted and thrown into jail - but that they were upset more than usual, ...


6

I get this: "Is your Christmas shopping done?". It's usually from a well-meaning customer who doesn't know my customs. I see no difference between this and "so what plans do you have for Friday night (or Saturday)". The question is certainly more prevalent at this time of year. If this is a "learning moment", where I choose to use my expansion of the ...



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