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Chabad.org gives the normative view of kaddish (my emphasis) While Kaddish is commonly known as the "mourners prayer," a reading of the text reveals that it is not about death or mourning, but the public proclamation of G-d's greatness. By rising from the depths of anguish and loss to offer praise to G-d, we transform the event of death into an ...


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In Shulchan Aruch, Choshen Mishpat 140:4 we learn that there is no difference whether your witnesses are dead, non-existent or unreachable. In all these cases they are treated as if they do not exist. That fact that you once had witnesses seems to have no practical application in Halacha. We actually have a fascinating case in Ketubos 23a (bottom of the ...


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The Ohr HaChaim's commentary to the story of the brother's casting Joseph into the pit has comments relevant to this question. He explains that the brothers felt Yosef was deserving of death because he had testified falsely about them to their father in matters involving a death penalty to a Ben Noach (Ohr HaChaim to 37:20, s.v. ואם תאמר). The brothers ...


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First off, I recommend perusing the forum for discussions on ontology, free will, and predestination, as those subjects are absolutely critical to a treatment of your question. I will provide an answer based upon my personal understanding of the issues involved. There are many sources throughout Rishonim, Achronim, and modern rabbis who talk about this and ...


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This article lists several situations when autopsies may be performed. I shall list a few ideas mentioned: The Torah itself states two people, namely Ya'akov and Yosef who were embalmed. The embalming process involved "disemboweling the body and filling the cavity with certain unguents." This was allowed because of kavod hamet - respect for the dead body. ...


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There are two general approached to this question. One approach, which I have seen in multiple sources, is that the body is also a future vessel of the soul, after the resurrection. This body will ultimately be reunited with the soul share in the pleasures of the ultimate reward post-resurrection. The earliest source that I know of for this idea is the Kol ...


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The Yosef Lekech on Megillas Esther addresses your question. He asks why we don't celebrate Chanukah with "mishteh v'simcha" (joyful partying) like we celebrate Purim. He answers that by Chanukah, unlike by Purim, there were casualties. While Hallel and thanksgiving are appropriate in recognition of the great salvation Hashem wrought, joyful partying would ...


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Ye'aros Devash by Rabbi Yonasan Eibeshitz writes that when a Gadol dies, his middos become accessable to everyone, and each person can pick one area to emulate and thereby acquire one aspect of the Gadol's greatness. I also saw that Rabbi Avigdor Miller answered this very question by saying: Fill the void by yourself becoming a Gadol! These are two ideas I ...



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