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22

In Tanach I find the following cases (there may be others I've missed): Moshe's court executing the blasphemer (Lev. 24:23) ...and the Shabbos violator (Num. 15:36) Yehoshua's court executing Achan for taking from the spoils of Jericho (Josh. 7:25) Navos being executed by the court of Jezreel on charges of blasphemy and cursing the king (I Kings 21:13). ...


18

Yes. The Talmud (Sanhedrin 105a; Rosh Hashanah 17a; See also Tosefos on Sanhedrin 13b) states that the wicked people of all nations will go to Gehenom (Hell), and that righteous people of all nations, Jew and non-Jew alike, will got to Gan Eden (Heaven). The Rambam (Maimonides) writes that anyone who has acquired knowledge of God and follows the Sheva ...


18

This kind of question is addressed by Maimonides in his Guide for the Perplexed (3:15), in which he states that we cannot ascribe to God the ability to do that which is impossible, thus, "it is impossible that God should produce a being like Himself, or annihilate, corporify, or change Himself. The power of God is not assumed to extend to any of these ...


16

This issue is discussed practically in Shut MiMa'amakim 2:4. (Shut MiMa'amakim (lit. "from the depths", cf Psalms 130:1) are the responsa of Rabbi Ephraim Oshri written between 1941 and 1945 in the Kovno Ghetto.) He writes that on the cold, rainy day of the Great Action when all the Jews were being rounded up for inspection, a Jew named Eliyahu הי"ד from ...


14

Indeed he can't perform yibbum - he would have to perform chalitzah instead. The reason is that while yibbum is a positive mitzvah, it's opposed by the positive mitzvah to marry a virgin (Lev. 21:13) and the negative mitzvah to not marry a widow (ibid. :14) - and a positive mitzvah can't override a positive plus a negative one. Even if the original marriage ...


12

The general consensus is that Sheol/Gehinom/Hell is a place the soul is sent to post-mortem for a Purgatory-like cleansing for up to 12 months. According to Nachmanides in Sha'ar HaGemul quoting Pirkei D'Rabbi Eliezer, She'ol is the lowest level of Hell, also known as Gehinom. He also has the best description of what it is and is cited by pretty much ...


12

In Shulchan Aruch, Yoreh De'ah 157:1, the Ramma quotes a Beis Yoseif saying that shaas hashmad is only when the gizeira (decree) is specifically against Jews. The Shach there (#6) clarifies that if the gizeira is against the entire medina (country or jurisdiction), even though Jews are included, it is not called shaas hashmad.


12

Megillah 28b (English) ההוא דהוי תני הלכתא סיפרא וסיפרי ותוספתא ושכיב אתו ואמרו ליה לרב נחמן ליספדיה מר אמר היכי נספדיה הי צנא דמלי סיפרי דחסר there was a certain man who used to repeat halachoth, Sifra and Sifre and Tosefta, and when he died they came and said to R. Nahman, Sir, will you deliver a funeral oration for him, and he said, How are ...


11

The Jews that died, did not want to leave Mitzrayim. Because of these problems Rav Shwab says that the Medrash should not be understood literally - rather only a relatively small number died, but had they lived they would have given birth to millions of people over several generations. The three opinions are arguing about how many ...


11

Short answer: Any STD. Basis for answer: This is discussed in the Tur and the Shulchan Aruch; Even HaEzer, Siman 9. It seems (based on reading the commentators on the above) that there are 2 approaches in the Gemara and both are considered as valid in Halacha. Medical approach The woman has a disease (what we'd call a STD) which results in her ...


11

See this Chabad.org article. In short, the answer is yes. While getting a tattoo is forbidden, once one has one there is no law that he/she cannot be buried in a Jewish cemetery. However, every Jewish burial society has the right to enact their own rules...


11

This is a matter of dispute in the Mishna Oholos 2:2. Rabbi Eliezer says one quarter kav worth of ash does transmit impurity, whilst the Sages say it does not transmit impurity at all. Rambam (Hilchos Tumas Meis 3:9-10) rules like the Sages.


10

There are a number of reasons, but one is that Jewish law mandates that the human body be treated with respect, even after death. This is true for both Jews and non-Jews, since we are all created "in the image of G-d" (Gen. 1:27); for Jews there is the additional idea that the body was in its lifetime a vehicle for mitzvos (the Divine commandments), and so ...


10

Nit'ei Gavriel (Aveilus 4:4) cites various sources that there is a common practice to not tear kriyah in this instance anyway (and in note יב he mentions other variations, such as leaving a button undone for a while, or tearing kriyah at the moment of death only for a distinguished person). In 4:7 he also writes that it is indeed not customary for doctors ...


10

As pointed out in the comments, the Talmud (Berachot 8A) says that there are 903 types of death in the world, and the least painful one is a kiss. From the way Rashi explains it, it appears that the pain refers to the separating of the soul from the body. The Talmud explains that the Kiss of Death is likened to removing a hair from milk. This does not ...


10

Seder Olam Rabba says that Leah passed away in year 2216 after creation, 9 years after Rochel, in the same year that brothers sold Yosef to Mitzrayim. Rochel died when she was 36, so Leah died when she was 45. More precisely, this is in the 2nd chapter of Seder Olam Raba. The Vilna Gaon derives there that Leah had to pass away before Yosef was sold.


10

The Gemara in Brachos 8a says מיתת נשיקה is "נשיקה דמיא כמשחל בניתא מחלבא" which Rashi explains to mean כמושך נימת שער מתוך החלב--like pulling a hair out of milk.


10

Yes. You say the following blessing (Shulchan Aruch OC 223:2 with commentaries): ברוך אתה יקוק אלוקינו מלך העולם דיין האמת.‏ Furthermore, if the deceased was a scholar to the extent that one could ask him a question in all matters of Torah and he knew right away, then the Shulchan Aruch rules (YD 340:7) that one must rend one's clothing in mourning ...


9

The default system (which, absent a will or any sentiments otherwise, halacha would apply upon the death of the father) is that daughters are supported from the estate until they are married. If there are funds beyond that available, they are divided among the sons. If there are X sons and none are the firstborn, the division is 1/X for each. If one son is ...


9

The Torah itself says (Ex. 22:30) that the meat of an animal that is tereifah (fatally injured) should be "thrown to the dogs." Now, granted, the animal wasn't necessarily a pet when it was alive (whether anyone back then kept pets is pretty uncertain anyway), but you had the obligation to feed it before yourself (Berachos 40a based on Deut. 11:15), and you ...


9

See our discussion and the sources brought here where it is shown that the pikuach nefesh of reviving a dead person is different than that of saving a live person in that it only overrides Torah commandments if there is a good chance (defined by some to be >50%) of success. Cyrogenics has about as low a success rate as one could imagine, so it would seem ...


9

Yaakov was 99 when Rachel died. He outlived her by 48 years. The Talmud (Megilah 17a) says that Yaakov was away from his father for 36 years. The first 14 were at the Yeshiva of Ever, 20 were spent at Lavan's house, and the last two were spent along the way home (at Sukkos and Beis-El), after which Rachel died. Since Yosef was born six years before Yaakov ...


8

To sum up what's been said so far: A Cohen, like any other Jew, is obligated to attempt to save a life. I'm not sure whether someone whose brain is alive but heart has stopped temporarily is halachically "alive", "dead", or possibly something in between. Again, this state doesn't naturally last for very long, so usually the discussion was about whether ...


8

The G'mara in B'rachos 18 says that the deceased are [at least] aware in the sense that they are alive and sentient.


8

If the person is suffering and there is no cure for their disease, yes it is allowed to pray that God put them out of their misery. There are many stories in the Gemara about rabbis doing just that. (E.g. Bava Metzia 84a.) Of course even if you're praying that God let them die, you have to do everything you can to make sure the person is getting the ...


8

Because thats when Moshe Rabenu lived until and no one can Live longer than him two sources that discus this reason and its shortcomings: THE REBBETZIN'S HUSBAND and Wolfish Musings


8

Technically, jutky is correct: once the Great Sanhedrin moved out of their office in the Beis Hamikdash, forty years before it was destroyed, capital punishment was no longer carried out. (Shabbos 15a, et al) That said, we do find sporadic cases where a beis din executed someone judicially in later times. One is in Sanhedrin 52b, where a kohen's daughter ...


8

Some base the Kadish for the soul on the date of death. Others say it goes from the date of the burial (See Pnei Baruch 34:9). The amount of time a soul should have the kadish is the 12 months of geihinom. The minhag is to retract this to 11 months so that it doesn't appear as if the son is assuming his parent needed geihinom (Rema YD 276:4). I have ...


8

The Shulchan Aruch (YD 157:1) discusses the issue of when one must (or may) martyr himself, know in Hebrew as קידוש השם - The [Ultimate] Sanctification of God's Name. If someone threatens your life if you won't break some rule: If you are alone (or in the presence of less than ten adult Jews): If he is doing so for his own personal benefit: If it is one ...


8

Per http://www.ashlag.com/parasha_in.asp?id=206&idd=5 this is based on a Maharam M'Rotenberg. The pain is not felt if the person is not anticipating a miracle, however if the person is anticipating a miracle then he does feel the pain. בשו״ת מהר״ם מרוטנבערג (סימן תקט״ז) דכשגמר האדם בדעתו למות על קידוש השם ומסר נפשו על זה, אז מכאן ואילך כל מה שעושים ...



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