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7

The single best place for online texts, commentaries and shiurim relating to Yerushalmi is definitely http://www.yerushalmionline.org/ They have daf yomi recordings for all of the Yerushalmi from shiurim given by Rabbi Yosef Gavriel Bechhofer as well as 100s of pdf's of articles and commentaries on the Yerushalmi. In my limited experience with the ...


6

Since Daf Yomi is printed in the weekly Dvar Malchus booklet - It's very unlikely that the Rebbe opposed learning it.


5

The best online resource would be yerushalmionline.org. It contains shiurim from R' Yosef Gavriel Bechhofer on the entire Yerushalmi, and links to helpful seforim. The top things to keep in mind (sorry, I can't think of exactly 5 right now) are that Yerushalmi's language is more terse than that of Bavli, and there is often little or no consensus as to how a ...


5

I heard (no source) that when asked once the Rebbe said Daf Yomi is not a "davar Hashaveh lcol nefesh" (something that would apply equally to everyone) unlike the shiurim in Chumash, Tehilim, Tanya and Rambam. However, it should also be mentioned that Lubavtich has its own (older) tradition from the Alter Rebbe (subsequently printed in Igros Kodesh of ...


5

Although there is a Daf for the day of Tisha B'Av it should not be learned on Tisha B'Av itself. It should be done either prior or after Tisha B'Av instead.


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a ) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daf_Yomi b) When the Daf Yomi was started the Vilna printing was not the only popular print in use and the signs that announced where folios were to be learnt and when included references to both versions of the Talmud.


3

There is a new free daf yomi app called "portal hadaf hyomi" The App includes many great features: The entire Talmud in clear fonts Talmud lessons to listen to and download, in Hebrew, English and Yiddish Articles, Leaflets,books and other helpful tools A location map for venues in which you can attend "Daf Hayomi" lectures A Calendar with enables the ...


3

There are Lubavitchers who do Daf Yomi, but I assume your question is why it isn't emphasized to learn Daf Yomi in Chabad. I believe the answer to your question is that Chabad has its own daily studies to do, like chumash, tehillim, Tanya, rambam. When a Lubavitcher does all those and has extra time, then he goes on to Daf Yomi, but he starts off with his ...


3

My local (USA) Young Israel synagogue has daf yomi classes Sunday mornings after shacharis, Monday through Thursday evenings, and Shabas afternoons before mincha. (That's six days of the week; I guess they cram seven days' worth into six days as best they can.) In an Agudath Israel synagogue I used to pray in (in the USA also), daf yomi was before shacharis ...


2

I question the basis for saying that most Lubavichers don't learn Daf Yomi. If, as indicated in the comments, this is based on your years in Yeshivah, then you've answered your own question: Daf Yomi is not part of any mainstream Yeshivah curriculum. It is, rather, a tool to encourage widespread Talmud Torah among the public not (or no longer) in Yeshivah. ...


2

Our Shul has two times: Sunday through Friday mornings at 6:00 and Sunday through Thursday nights at 8:45. The Friday night shiur is given Shabbos morning before Shacharis, and Shabbos afternoon's shiur is both groups combined. Basically Shabbos day you could have a shiur before or after any davening, or, if you specifically need electronic resources, just ...


2

At the Shi'ur I attended last night, the learning formally ended at the conclusion of the half-(ok, Rov-)'Amud and a Siyum commenced. Since we were in a Sukkah, some foods were brought out and drinks were poured, at which point a Daf-Yomi beginner, who had been a regular participant in this group, walked in late. As a service to him, and to make his first ...


2

I've been using Crowded Road's iTalmud. It had some major issues with download management and audio playback, but a recent update reduced these to minor issues, at least for me.


2

Just a note from an extremely similar topic: The current Chabad custom is to learn every day a portion of Chumash, Tanya, and Tehillim, collectively known as Chitas, as well as a portion of Rambam's Mishneh Torah and/or Sefer Hamitzvos. These are daily studies just as Daf Yomi is daily. The Chabad Minhag, as cited in this Book of Chabad Minhagim (Hebrew), ...


1

In the olden days - as stated in Pirkei Avoth בן חמש למקרא - one would only learn Shas (Talmud Bavli) after becoming proficient in Chumash and Mishna. One would then concentrate on Shas as it's the basis for Halacho. Besides, it's really difficult to properly understand Rambam, Tur and Shulchan Aruch (the 3 "off the page" pillars of Halacha) without ...


1

In my experience, only the last amud (or half-amud) of that mesechta is learned. The next day, the new mesechta is begun.



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