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NOTE: I am not a science guy but found the following interesting. Copy/Paste from the Ohr Somayach "Ask The Rabbi" Far from being frightened by dinosaurs, Rabbi Yisrael Lifshitz, author of the Tiferet Yisrael commentary on the Mishna, received the news of fossil discoveries in the nineteenth century with delight. As he had undoubtedly expected, they ...


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Except for the Baby Seal's excellent answer, I remember one more explanation. In Judaism the day starts from the evening. For example, Shabbath starts on Friday evening and finishes on Saturday evening. This rule is learned from this very verse you are talking about. You can interpret "one day" as "the same day", meaning that evening and morning belongs to ...


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I discuss some of the logical reasoning in Breishis - Creationism and Evolutionism Logically, we can consider Creation in a way like building a computer program from modules. Each "day" is a different module turned on and off for the unit testing. This is why the first time, when time is created, is יום אחד (one day) and the following days are of the form ...


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Breishis And God called the light day, and the darkness He called night, and it was evening and it was morning, one day. ה. וַיִּקְרָא אֱלֹהִים | לָאוֹר יוֹם וְלַחשֶׁךְ קָרָא לָיְלָה וַיְהִי עֶרֶב וַיְהִי בֹקֶר יוֹם אֶחָד: And God called the expanse Heaven, and it was evening, and it was morning, a second day. ...


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I remember seeing that rishon, what you are calling an ordinal number, is only in reference to something else, i.e. the day before or the day after, neither of which existed. Therefore echad was used. This is said by the Ramban.


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Rashi says it is "the day of the One". Because the angels weren't created until day two, God was the only sentient being on this day. Obviously this reason doesn't apply from day two onwards, per Rashi's words. Kli Yakar prefers to say that the verse is asserting that one God created both light/day, and dark/evening, as the Sages would take care to mention ...


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It is difficult to separate this answer from science. Ultimately the discovery, knowledge and theory about dinosaurs is a scientific one; one that is not really discussed in classic Judaic literature due to the discovery of dinosaur fossils begin relatively recent. Rabbi Slifkin has a chapter devoted to this in 'the Challenge of Creation' (chapter 17 ...


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According to Rashi's commentary on Genesis, the order of events presented therein is not to be taken literally. He concludes a long comment on 1:1 with: על כרחך לא לימד המקרא סדר המוקדמים והמאוחרים כלום Perforce, you must admit that Scripture did not teach us anything about the sequence of the earlier and the later [acts of creation]. He backs ...


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It occured to me while reading the Gen 1, that reptiles may be implied by the verses. First check out this answer. The exegetical approach used therein is the one I am attempting to use. Next, note the wording of verse 20, when water life and flying things are introduced: וַיֹּאמֶר אֱלֹהִים--יִשְׁרְצוּ הַמַּיִם, שֶׁרֶץ נֶפֶשׁ חַיָּה; וְעוֹף יְעוֹפֵף ...


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the purpose of nature is to provide a misleading appearance that the world carries itself. Therefore, when nature was created, with it came the loopholes for interpreting the world according to the view that the universe always carried itself. Even though, it was 5 minutes old, Adam looked like a 30 year old man. Likewise, the light from stars millions of ...


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Mosquitoes exist to feed the bats. All animals have a place in the food-chain.


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Yishai left a comment with a link to an article, in which the Lubavitcher Rebbe remarks that the mosquito is a creature that only takes, and doesn't give.... The mosquito does serve somewhat as a giver, the Rebbe explained. Its contribution is the lesson it provides for us. The mosquito is the one who teaches us the very concept that to be a G-dly ...


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This is adressed in the Tiferes Yisroel on Avos, ch. 4 mishna 3, oisios 20 & 21. The mishna says ואל תהי מפליג מכל דבר, don't be seperated from anything. The T.Y. explains this to mean not to question any of Hashems creations and to assume there is a good reason for them, even if we don't know the reason. He singles out the fly the gnat and snakes and ...


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This question was the root of an argument between Dr. Schroeder and Rabbi Slifkin. Dr. Schroeder insists (in his book Genesis and the Big Bang, and in many public lectures) that the order of creation in the Torah is meant to be taken chronologically and is correct. He explained the flying creatures which existed before the land animals to be referring to ...



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