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The Avarbanel here explains that god did that to warn bilam and make him understand that just as he can put whatever he wants in the ass's mouth , so he will do with bilam's mouth


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Rabbeinu Bechayei on Pirkei Avot 5:8 expands on the Mishnah citation that among the 10 things created during twilight prior to the start of Shabbat, is the mouth of the donkey that spoke to Bil'am. He states that all 10 things in the list were created for the honor of Israel. The main idea to be learned is that the donkey doesn't speak on its own, but ...


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Indeed, Rashi (Kesubos 8a) agrees with your intution: והתקין לו ממנו: מגופו מצלעותיו And he fashioned for him, from him: From his body; from his ribs. However, an alternate explanation is noted by R. Aaron ben Jacob Hakohen of Lunel in Orchos Chaim (Hil. Kiddushin § 21): והתקין לו ממנו בנין עדי עד: פי׳ הנפש השכלית שנחצבת מגלגל תשיעי ועומדת ...


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'To bestow goodness'; in order for men to enjoy it, by enjoying it this gives pleasure. The second question is dealt with by Derech Hashem in the first section chapter 2. In short what he says is that in order to achieve or have something in totality, one must be the owner of that thing. G-d alone is perfect, not lacking anything and is in essence this ...


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The Ramchal addresses this issue in Derech Hashem (among other places). He explains that the ultimate good is Hashem Himself, and therefore connecting to Hashem and being like Hashem is the ultimate experience of good. A central element of Hashem's perfection is that He was not given His perfection by an external source, but rather His perfection is ...


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Rabbi Arye Kaplan explains in his "If You Were G-d" that shame is being in the wrong place. Shame is not a vestigial emotion from the cave days. It is a perception of yourself. When you get without deserving you are getting what is not yours. It is like the butler sitting in the dais. Whether or not he feels funny about it, it is funny. This is like the ...


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There are really two ways to look at this question. One way is "what purpose is served through the creation of man," which is what the other answers have addressed. The other way to ask the question is "what was Hashem's motivation in deciding to create man?" This second question is what the Rambam describes as having no "real" answer. The Rambam writes ...


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to answer part of the question from the chovos halevavos gate 4 ch.3 "That one is conscious of G-d's abundant goodness to man, and how He brought him into existence out of abundant and pure benevolence and kindness, without man being worthy of this, nor because G-d has any need for him, but only out of generosity, benevolence, and goodness" ...


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I'll quote a bit from Rabbi Kaplan's handbook of Jewish thought chapter three entitled Man. See there for his sources. 3:4 Since God is absolutely perfect in Himself, it is obvious that He had no inner need to create the universe. It must be concluded that God's creation of the universe was a most perfect act of altruism and love. It is thus written "The ...



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