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14

We never claimed that the recipe originated from the Terumas Hadeshen; that was the article author's own conclusion. What we said in the book was, "As early as the fifteenth century, it is recorded that every Friday evening the Austrian sage Rabbi Israel ben Petahiah Isserlein (1390-1460) welcomed Shabbes with “three fine hallot kneaded with eggs oil, and a ...


11

Kutach HaBavli -- moldy bread, milk, and salt. Yum yum! Anomalin (or "yeinmilin"): Wine + honey + pepper. Delish! How about Rashi's favorite? Fried eggs with honey. He would make a shehakol and eat this even before hamotzee -- "oh he held like the Rambam that chaviv trumps all."


11

In Isur Veheter there is a concept: "Ain Taam Yotzei Mchaticha Lchaticha blo Rotev". Taste can't transfer without liquid. So if a slice of bread absorbed meat taste (so there is no actual meat in the bread, just taste), then one puts that (hot) bread on (hot) cheese, the taste cannot go from the bread into the cheese. Another example of this idea is "Shtei ...


10

Some background: The Gemara is concerned that if people leave a pot on the flame starting Friday afternoon, a person may get impatient for his dinner and stir the pot around on the flame, or play with the flame, to get it to cook faster. The normal recommended alternative is if you want to leave a pot cooking from before Shabbos, you must make sure the ...


10

http://www.youngisrael.org/content/PDFs/Halacha_Central/Halochoscope/hs14-10a.pdf A thermometer is used for a different type of measurement. The operative term is tikun ochel, accomplishing some positive change in the food. A utensil used to measure ingredients or portions performs such a function. A thermometer is used to decide whether the food ...


9

Rasash Pesachim 53a writes that if a community's custom is not to eat roasted meat on the evening of 15 Iyar for the same reason it is not eaten on the night of Pesach, then they should not eat it. He writes that even in a community which doesn't have this custom, eating a full roasted lamb in the manner of the Korban Pesach would remain prohibited as that ...


8

Shulchan Aruch, YD 87:3: אינו נוהג אלא בבשר בהמה טהורה בחלב בהמה טהורה אבל בשר טהורה בחלב טמאה או בשר טמאה בחלב טהורה מותרים בבישול ובהנאה "[The prohibition] is only relevant with regards to meat from a kosher animal in milk from a kosher animal, but with regards to meat from a kosher animal in milk from a non-kosher animal or meat from a non-kosher ...


8

According to the Star-K Tevila Guidelines, no tevila is required for a meat thermometer.


8

From a Kosher Spirit interview with Rabbi Chaim Cohn: KS: Can you share a unique experience that you had while working at the OK? RCC: I once had an argument with a plant engineer concerning whether or not stainless steel can absorb or not. He maintained and brought extensive documentation to prove that stainless steel can’t absorb anything ...


7

Rashi in Pesachim 39a says that shaluk is extensively cooked, and Tosafos there 39b agrees. That's pretty much the standard pshat. However, Ran in Nedarim 49a translates it there as undercooked.


7

A Drizzle of Honey is a collection of recipes redacted (by modern scholars) from expulsion-era Spain based on, of all things, inquisition testimony. All redaction from just ingredients lists is speculative, but these ring true based on other renaissance cooking research I've seen. I've made several of the recipes in this book with generally-good results; ...


7

The reasoning is the same and stated in S.A. O.C 253:5- it isn't the normal way of cooking. Solid foods that have been cooked or baked are no longer subject to its respective melacha of bishul (ain bishul achar bishul). Placing the item on the stove from, say, the fridge is at best rabinically forbidden because it appears to others like you are cooking ...


7

I have heard, I believe from Rabbi Daniel Stein, that Rav Soloveitchk is quoted as crafting the following logic: Chicken soup, unlike water, does not as a practical reality lose its cooking (azil lei bishulei) when cooled. If I have water, boil it, and let it cool, it is basically back to where I started. If I cook soup, and let it cool, I have cold ...


7

Technically, flavor does not transfer from one utensil to another unless some liquid is present as a conduit. Practically, however, there will usually be spillover that can cause problems. In theory one could use a separate crock with an aluminum liner to catch any spills, but this is not very practical either. Probably the best bet is to buy a dedicated ...


7

Per this article at ohr.edu there are 2 possibilities where one may cook meat with milk. One solution (which should only be done with the parents' permission) is that your daughter put the pot on the stove and supervise while one of the children lights the fire; or that she first light the fire and supervise while the child places the pot. By ...


7

No, one should not recite a bracha. The Shulchan Aruch (YD 329:3) rules that thick dough kneaded to be boiled (which is what deep frying is) is exempt from Challah. The Shach notes that some opinions don't care what his intentions are when kneading, and if it is a thick bread-like dough it is obligated in Challah from the time of kneading. The Pitchei ...


6

The Torah uses two different terms for "work," מלאכה and עבודה. In the case of Shabbos, the Torah consistently says that no מלאכה may be done on it (Ex. 20:9, 31:14-15, 35:2; Lev. 23:3; Deut. 5:13). By contrast, with Yom Tov, the Torah states in several places that מלאכת עבודה is prohibited (Lev. 23 passim, Num. 28-29 passim). Ramban (to Lev. 23:7) explains ...


6

The latter. This is based on the principle that זכין לאדם שלא בפניו - you can confer a benefit on someone without their being present. You just have to inform them, before they start doing things on Yom Tov to prepare for Shabbos, that it was done. (Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 527:9)


6

See the Aruch HaShulchan YD 87:10 where he says that you cannot bring a proof from the laws of Shabbos to say that frying is a problem of cooking meat and milk. Similarly, by smoking (in #25) he writes the same. In #31 he discusses bishul acher bishul, but seems to conclude that again, despite the rules of Shabbos, the rules of basar b'chalav are different. ...


6

Your questions are related, but involve different subsets of law to answer them. As you know, uncooked products may not be cooked on Shabbos. What constitutes cooking? From OC 318:4 and commentaries: Primary container on a fire (empty or with liquid): Potential to cook anything. Primary container removed from the fire- still hot: Potential to cook ...


6

Per the cRc it does not require Bishul Yisroel Generally speaking, if a non-Jew cooks a food in a country wherein that food is eaten raw, then that food remains permitted to the kosher consumer regardless of where it is eaten. This is because food that is eaten raw is precluded from being bishul akum and, subsequently, the non-Jew's cooking is ...


6

This answer is going to need some background knowledge of bittul (nullification). This will be very much oversimplified, but enough for our purposes, I think. Two Types of Bittul Min BeMino - a mixture of the same types of food. In this case the prohibited substance (the 'issur') is batel if it is in the minority (rov). The rabbis enacted a restriction ...


6

Per the cRc Chicago: Starbucks Via Instant coffee may be used on Shabbos (when prepared in the proper way of preparing instant beverages on Shabbos). Also: We were in touch with the Rav HaMachshir who reports that it is pre-cooked sufficiently to permit its use on Shabbos.


6

שולחן ערוך יורה דעה הלכות תערובות סימן קיג:טז ‏כלים שבשל בהם העובד כוכבים לפנינו דברים שיש בהם משום בישולי עובדי כוכבים, צריכים הכשר. ויש אומרים שאינם צריכים. ואף לדברי המצריכים הכשר, אם הוא כלי חרס מגעילו שלש פעמים, ודיו, מפני שאין לאיסור זה עיקר מדאורייתא.‏ My rough translation: Dishes that a non-Jew cooked food with (in our ...


6

I'm surprised by this question because there is extensive halachic decisions instructing us as to how we may add water to a pot of cholent, whether on a blech or in a crock pot. Rabbi Moshe Feinstein, zt'l, for example, wrote a decision permitting the adding of water that was kept hot, but not as hot as the contents of the cholent pot, to prevent a cholent ...


6

Let's assume the people eating it are all non-Jews. At that point the only problems (that I can think of) are: cooking meat and milk together, and benefiting from meat-and-milk-cooked-together. If you're just doing the dessert, cleanup, or setup, I can't see that as tangible benefit from the main course. (Feeding it to your dog when you would otherwise ...


6

From my experience as a kosher Chef. This is quite an endeavour but not impossible. One lambs head will not provide much meat but enough for all to taste. Here is one with usage of Moroccan spices/ Sephardic flavours which go nicely with lamb and garnished with glazed apples appropriate for the holiday. For the head; 1 whole lambs head brain removed.( note ...


5

As I understand it, the Talmud said there was no prohibition at all from cooking with direct sunlight; cooking on a solar-heated brick was prohibited because it looked like you were using an oven-heated brick. With various lenses and reflectors, presumably you put the food in and then apply the lens; the cooking is with direct sunlight (albeit focused ...


5

Consult your local Orthodox rabbi. But, to possibly point others in the direction of interesting answers, I have heard it argued that a microwave is considered akin to toledat ha-chama. See here and here. In terms of cooking on Shabbat, there seems to be one understanding that it is merely a shinui (e.g. Rav Moshe Feinstein); and another understanding that ...


5

The format of a 2-day Yom Tov is a s'feika d'yoma. If Thursday is the Yom Tov, I cannot cook for Friday which is Chol (Rosh Hashana isn't exactly because of the same reason, but the same answer would apply).



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