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13

I'm surprised to read the other answers provided, not to mention the direction of the question leading to those answers. I didn't know what to expect when I clicked on the title, but it wasn't that. I have personally never heard the word in any context other than, simply, "friendly". As in: "This is a Heimish Shul" (not as a denomination, but just ...


12

Having grown up "heimish" I will do my best to explain. The first thing I tell people that ask me to define Heimish, is "mixed up". From the outside looking in, our accent in davening is typically that of chassidim, yet we (For the most part) are clean shaven (which is a huge no-no in the chassidish world). You might see us wear a gartel on shabbos ...


12

Yekke Jews are of German ancestry. They have a number of very strong traditions that set them a bit apart from the rest of "Ashkenazi" Jewry, including, but not limited to, young men wearing a Tallith Gadol prior to marriage, and slightly different cantillation tunes than most Ashkenazim.


12

It refers to the Jewish community of Germany, especially of Frankfurt-am-Main and its vicinity, which (the community of Frankfurt) was later transplanted to other places, especially the Washington Heights neighborhood of New York City. Wikipedia has more.


11

The vast majority of shuls self-identified as Orthodox are mainstream. So chances are, any Orthodox shul or community you approach will be mainstream. Sabbateans are non-existent, as far as I know. Karaites are very rare and will not pretend to be Orthodox. Any Orthodox shul without a mechitza (I hear there are a few left) is outside of the mainstream, ...


10

There has never been an official Chief Rabbi of the United States. Jonathon D. Sarna (in his American Judaism: A History. Yale University Press, 2004, page 105) explains this phenomenon thus: But since there was no parallel Christian religious authority—no chief Protestant minister, no archbishop, not even a Catholic cardinal with nationwide ...


9

The word Heimish means comfortable. So to a Litvak another Litvak is Heimish and to a Chassid another Chassid is Heimish.


9

Any of many groups that lived in or used caves could be given the name Magharians (from Arabic). The tenth century (CE) Karaite Jacob Qirqisani described them as a pre-Christian group with distinctive views about angels, creation and biblical anthropomorphisms. According to Muslim scholar al-Biruni (973-1048) they used a lunar calendar and observed Rosh ...


8

From what I gather (from here and elsewhere), the group is a Christian group which accepts Jesus as a messianic figure and which considers itself to be the only valid set of descendants from the ancient tribal sons of Jacob. They have no connection to Judaism that modern Judaism would accept (without matrilineal descent or an approved process of conversion) ...


5

I've always heard this used as a synonym for "frum". If it has a more specific connotation, based on the usage I have heard, I would interpret it as having the following characteristics: very traditional (i.e. not modern), black hat, and linguistically the environment would be yiddish/english. Update: I discussed this question with our Rabbi at shul today, ...


5

Answer: Levites: 4%, Priests: 4%. A scientific article which deals with the genetics of priests and Levites quotes a book from 1999 (not available for reading online) which estimates Levites and priests each at 4% of the general Jewish population. Source: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S000292970763626X#bbib6 Referenced book: "The genetic ...


5

Depending on who you ask, you may get slightly different answers. This is what I understand, from a mostly historical and Chassidic perspective. (Garnered from R' Yossi Paltiel1, Berel Wein2, and a bit of Wikipedia3.) The Baal Shem Tov started his teaching not long after the false messiah, Shabtai Tzvi created massive chaos in the Jewish world. Shabtai ...


5

Echoing others, the answer to this question is elusive and is likely to remain so: We are beset by many problems. And our thorniest and perhaps most disabling problem is, curiously, an "identity crisis"--perhaps a sign of our youthfulness as an ideological movement. Objectively examined, what binds us together as a separate entity is our full ...


5

Here's a quick chart I made, based on my own knowledge. It flows chronologically from top-to-bottom, and is not drawn to scale. (Horizontal axis is meaningless.) Bold boxes are groups that are still around today. Italic boxes are general categories. Dashed lines indicate unknown or disputed; Curved lines indicate indirect relationship. Dates are ...


5

Nusach Sfard (not to be confused with Nusach Sefaradit Or Edot HaMizrach) is the nusach (that contains many Kabbalistic inyanim) used by families and communities who ancestrally were influenced by the teachings of the Ba'al Shem Tov (founder of the Chassidus movement) and his many students. Nusach Sfard is primarily used by (Ashkenazi) people who originate ...


4

I think that the answer to this question is "it depends." If the Chabad-trained conversion candidate does not espouse "Meshichist" doctrine -- the advocacy that the deceased Lubavitcher Rebbe is/will be the Messiah, in contradiction to the Rambam's position that a deceased person cannot come back to be the Messiah -- then I doubt there will be any issue in ...


4

In Breslov specifically we are careful to adhere to the Rebbe's words and avoid any unnecessary stringencies. As such, a conversion by a shomer Shabbos beis din that involved bris mila, mikvah, and sincere and total kabalos mitzvos would generally be seen as valid to most Breslov communities and individuals. All that said, to the best of my knowledge ...


4

What is World ORT? World ORT is as much a 'movement' as an organisation. Yes, we were founded in St Petersburg in 1880 and, since then, we have become the world's largest Jewish education and vocational training NGO. The acronym ‘ORT’ comes from its original Russian name; ‘Organization for Rehabilitation and Training’ is a later innovation. But if we’re so ...


4

Check out the Nefesh B'Nefesh Community Database which lets you search according to a number of criteria. Off the top of my head (and if you're sure Ramat Beit Shemesh is out), from the information you give you might want to look into Yad Binyamin, Modiin, Moshav Matisyahu, Nof Ayalon, Efrat/Alon Shvut/Neve Daniel


4

I think it's a corruption of "tovot v'neimot" -- may you (plural) merit to many good, pleasant years. If you check with Rabbi Google, searching on תזכו לשנים רבות טובות, you'll see the concluding word is generally "ne'imot." This website (of which I know nothing else) records a Sephardic practice where you say "may you merit to many years", and the other ...


3

The Hebrew Israelite issue is a demonstration of how complete and unfounded wannabism can be turned into a reality. Towards the end of the 19th century some African-Americans churches who previously had identified themselves with the ancient Hebrews shifted into an identification as ancient Hebrews. This movement gave birth to various groups, mostly clear ...


3

This is a very complicated question, with a complicated answer. I apologize that I can't provide sources for my answer, and I will try to simplify it. If you look at the Talmud and earliest mystical writings, the answer to this question would be a clear "No", Judaism does not attempt to unify and "feel" Gd. Rather the goal of the mystical journey is to ...


3

The Persian community (mostly Shirazi) absorbed by Baltimore contains a high fraction of Cohanim and very few Leviim.


2

Djerba has almost all kohanim.


2

Not really a complete answer, but the Jews in these countries arrived from different places and at different times. For example, most Polish Jews came from Germany, while early Ukrainian Jewry seems to have come from the Byzantine empire and/or from the Khazar kingdom. So it is not too surprising that they had different accents. [We tend to lump all of the ...


2

He would be allowed to marry in. It's an explicit Mishna in Yadayim 4:4


2

Heimish is used by both the hard-core Chasidish AND by the (for lack of a better term) Chasidish-lite (i.e. Chasidic background and customs but not dress.) It is not used by the Litvish (or the Yekkes for that matter) in the same context.


2

I am a ger who converted with Chabad Beis Din and ,BH ,I am accepted in Satmar ( they invited me to simches and they brought me to speak to their rebbe) I am also accepted in the yeshivis world ,got alyot in their shuls


2

One option is Ramat Bet Shemesh. It might also be quite expensive by now, but the newer projects might be in your ballpark. It is very diverse and has TONS of English-speaking people. There is also an English-speaking community in Moshav Matityahu. There are also more "Modern Orthodox" English-speaking communities in Efrat, Maale Adumim, and to a lesser ...


2

Rabbi Eleazar Ben Hanania Ben Hizkiya. The evidence for this one is not 100% proof, but: 1) In Shabbat 13b it says that חנניה בן חזקיה וסעתו compiled Megillat Taanit. He is also identified as one of the leaders of Beit Shammai, and is known for "saving" the book of Ezekiel among other things. 2) We only have an Aramaic version of Megilat Taanit, but ...



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