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16

A common commentary to the Yerushalmi that serves a similar function to Rashi is the Penei Moshe written by Rabbi Moshe Margolis. A volume from the Talmud Yerushalmi with his commentary can be seen here. Other commentaries that follow a similar pattern are Korban Ha'edah by Rabbi David Frankel and Chiddushei Ridvaz by Rabbi Yaakov David Willowsky. These are ...


14

This article, by Prof. Rivka Ulmer, might answer some of your questions... She writes (pg. 108): "Prior to the attestation in the New Testament, there is no evidence of Psalm 22 being used in a Jewish messianic context... Jewish interpretations of the Psalm identify the individual in the Psalm with a royal figure, alternatively interpreted as King David, ...


13

The Commentary on the Mishnah came first. In his colophon at the end of it, Rambam writes that he began writing the commentary at age 23, and finished it at age 30, in the year 1479 of the "Era of Documents" (4928 since Creation, 1168 CE). The Mishneh Torah, on the other hand, was written in the 4930s. In the introduction he says that the current year is ...


11

Rabbi Shmuel David Luzzatto is a pashtan and grammarian. He is not a rationalist, though sometimes his conclusions are the same as the rationalist meforshim. But, if he thought that the best peshat in a pasuk was that magic was real, for example, he would endorse it as such. He dislikes and criticizes derash, when intended seriously as historical and ...


11

The standard pagination and layout of the Gemara follows that of Daniel Bomberg's edition of 1520-22, which was the first time that Shas was printed as a complete set. (Earlier Jewish printers, including the famous Soncino family, had produced only individual volumes.) A notable difference is that Berachos has 66 pages as compared to today's 64; that change ...


10

No edition of the Torah I have seen has included the commentaries M'tzudas David or M'tzudas Tziyon, but that does not prove anything. However, the author of both, in his introduction says the following, implying that the commentary is written specifically on (and beginning with) the N'vi'im (text is from this paper on the commentaries and the translation is ...


10

R' Hirsch (Isaac's suggestion) and Ramban (Hacham Gabriel's suggestion) are both widely available in English, and for good reason. Both are very easy to appreciate, both on the simplest of levels, as well as on much deeper planes. If your Hebrew improves or you can get a learning partner who is also capable of being a mentor, I highly, highly recommend ...


10

Rashi's commentary seems to indicate that it refers to the plight of the Jewish Nation in Exile.


9

To quote S. from On The Main Line: Rashi was known by Christians as Rabbi Solomon Jarchi (Yarchi) because of a mistake, the mistake being that it was thought that 1) he was from Lunel and 2) that the yud stood for ירחי, which was Hebrew for "from Lunel" (Lunel as in luna as in moon). This mistake was so entrenched that the Chida (page 6 in linked ...


9

A good place to look to find refutations of Christian messianic interpretations of the bible is Sefer Nitzachon, printed in Otzar Vikuchim by Dr. J. D. Eisenstein. This is his answer to this specific case (p. 256): The Christian claim is that Jesus was crying to G-d, his father, "Why have you abandoned me?" at the time he was being executed. But according ...


8

I've got to put in a plug for the translation and commentary of R' Hirsch, of which I'm a big fan. I love his elegant, holistic, thoughtful take on the whole Torah, especially the ritual stuff in Leviticus (Temple offerings, ritual purity, etc.) that's otherwise most difficult to understand from a modern perspective. When I read R' Hirsch, everything fits ...


8

It was written on all of the Prophets and the Writings with the exception of Ruth, Lamentations and Esther. It was not written on Chumash. Source


8

I have an old copy of The Jewish Observer that discusses the ban. It seems a couple comments in his translation of the Talmud implied that certain sages ruled consistently in a particular fashion (e.g. stringently) because their personality inclined in that direction. Some were worried that readers would infer that the sages were allowing their personal ...


7

You may also want to look into a commentary that's more at the "macro" level. That is, a text which considers a couple of big questions per parasha and then exams the many answers to those questions from the commentators. A famous one that I recommend is Nehama Leibowitz: New Studies in the Weekly Parasha (7 volume set) Amazon source for English ...


7

Double AA covered the main commentaries on Yerushalmi. Here are a few very useful contemporary ones: Lev Yerushalayim (on all of Yerushalmi, I think) Commentary of Rav Chaim Kanievsky (example here) The Artscroll Yerushalmi (in progress)


7

The difficulty with your question is as follows: In those days (almost) everything was oral. For example we have lots of things the Hillel said (he lived around then), but they were not written down then - they were written down later. So do they count? They are certainly commentary, but they were only written down later. The Talmud is full of things that ...


6

The first Mikraot Gedolot was printed by Daniel Bromberg in 1516-1517. http://he.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D7%9E%D7%A7%D7%A8%D7%90%D7%95%D7%AA_%D7%92%D7%93%D7%95%D7%9C%D7%95%D7%AA


6

According to this note (in the list of commentators used by Nechama Leibowitz in her own essays on the Torah), he was a dayan in the Sephardic community of Hamburg, and died in 1701 (R. David Nieto, in his letter cited below, gives it as Cheshvan 5462, which matches the claim of 1701). It seems, too, that the correct Latin-alphabet spelling of his family ...


6

According to the JNUL website, Printed editions of the commentaries on tractates Ta’anit, Nedarim, Nazir and Horayot have been mistakenly attributed to him, and were most probably written by the scholars of Mainz or others. Likewise the printed commentary on Moed Katan is wrongly attributed to him. Two tractates have partial Rashi commentaries: Bava ...


6

The Traditional Path of learning Tanach in the Yeshivah is to get a copy of the Mikrot Gedolot, and the Jastrow Dictionary. Sadly, I don't think Mikrot Gedolot has been fully translated into English yet. Mikrot Gedolot, generally contains the following Commentaries, in addition to Rashi and Onkelos. (Of course, there are different versions, with slightly ...


6

Yes, they are the same, according to this article. It was apparently his last name (maybe what he went by in legal papers).


6

"Rashi was also called Jarchi, derived from the name of the city in which he lived, "Lunel." Jerach being the Hebrew, as lune is the French for moon." ~taken from this webpage. ~The Chida brings this in Shem HaGedolim, in his entry on Rashi (page 6 of this pdf)


6

In an old Jews for Jesus brochure I saved from my college days, there is a section that quotes several Biblical verses which they say foretell the life of Christ. One of these is Psalms 22:16 (verse 17 in our Bible), which they translate as "They pierced my hands and feet." This supposedly foretells the crucifixion of Jesus where his hands and feet were ...


6

I think the commentary Beit Lehem Yehuda by Rabbi Yehudah Fetayah fits that description. The author says in the introduction that he wants to provide something like what Rashi provides for people learning Talmud. The commentary aims to be an aid to understanding the words of the text as directly as possible.


6

If a five-time Oscar winner makes stupid comments about current political events he knows nothing about, does that mean we shouldn't trust his advice about acting? Of course we should: his acting has been tried and found true. Similarly (though l'havdil), any authority the Jewish community as a whole has examined over the years and accepted is a "winner".


5

I can only speak from my experiences. Those who the Mishna Berura as their halachic decisor of known cases will follow through on his psak in the Biur Halacha as well.


5

In grade school (or so), I learned (though I don't remember from whom/where) that things that were obvious to those with a stronger m'sora were not written down; later generations' respective rabbis wrote them as those rabbis realized that the matters were not so obvious to their own contemporaries. This is a sort of extension of the es laasos lAshem that ...


5

Genesis 6:4 ד) הַנְּפִלִים הָיוּ בָאָרֶץ בַּיָּמִים הָהֵם וְגַם אַחֲרֵי כֵן אֲשֶׁר יָבֹאוּ בְּנֵי הָאֱלֹהִים אֶל בְּנוֹת הָאָדָם וְיָלְדוּ לָהֶם הֵמָּה הַגִּבֹּרִים אֲשֶׁר מֵעוֹלָם אַנְשֵׁי הַשֵּׁם: Rashi, Ibn Ezra, Radak, Ramban (quoting Rashi and Radak), Chizkuni, and Malbim (on Genesis 8:21) all say that they were giants (ענקים). This ...


5

It seems that the Taz is saying that one should object to feeding a vicious dog a loaf of bread with a needle in it, as a way of disposing of it. Rather, the proper way to kill the dog is with poison. It seems that, according to the Taz, giving the dog a loaf of bread with a needle in it is not, in this instance, a violation of tzaar baalei chaim nor of bal ...



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