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12

אין צביעה באוכלין -- There is no [prohibition of] dyeing with respect to food. Some relevant info from here: Is one permitted to add food coloring to food on Shabbos? One of the 39 prohibited labors on Shabbos is צובע or Coloring because in the process of the building of the Mishkan we find that they would dye wool that was used for making the ...


10

It's just a bookbinding technique. http://bookbinding.com/bookbinding-for-amateurs/coloring-edges.html


10

The Mishna Brurah 610:16 says women customarily wear white and clean clothes. Not sure what people do today.


9

I am not certain but I suspect that it is simply a decorative practice. I believe I have seen it done on older, non-Jewish books and I assume that the practice has faded in favor of more economical/contemporary styles. Jews who buy seforim, on the other hand, are a little more inclined for "classic" styles and or more interested in a more distinguished ...


8

I recall reading the study in question and it is significant in that the color red did not effect how the male perceived the female's other traits such as intelligence or kindness but only his, shall we say, interest in her. Although it is not clear based on this study whether this tendency is the result of biological factors, cultural factors, or both, it ...


8

I am going to deal with the bleeding first. Shulhan Arukh O"H 320:20 There is an opinion who holds that when eating berries and other dyeing fruits one must take care not to touch one’s clothes or a cloth with fruit-colored hands, but if one colors bread with the coloring liquid it is not a problem because there is no prohibition to color ...


8

Keset HaSofer 21:14 rules that you can't put ground ivory into the tefillin paint as it is not from a kosher animal (an elephant). Accordingly, it would seem that one would need to make sure to use paint that has a certification ensuring that all ingredients are from kosher species.


8

In a midrash: Why did he repeat? Esav found Yaakov preparing lentils for his father in a dish, and told him "feed me" [=hal'iteni na min haadom]. He said, "wait, I'll prepare you another dish. I prepared this one for my father and don't want to cancel my mitzva. But if you're willing to sell your birthright, I'll give you my father's dish, which I'm ...


8

Even if the threads are fairly fine (and we don't know if they were), two colors plied together still looks like two colors, not the combined color. Thread is not like paint. Now even if at the usual viewing distance most people would see it as the combined color, it would not look that way close up, like to the kohein wearing the garment or tending to the ...


8

R' Hirsch (e.g. in the long comment at the end of Ex. 25:1-8) takes the four types of thread used in Mishkan construction to represent four basic aspects of life that we humans need to strive to perfect within ourselves and unify in the service of God: Linen, from the flax plant = Vegetative - consumption and reproduction Wool died red with worm blood = ...


8

Zohar (Bereishis 18b and in other places) states that the rainbow has three colors, חוור סומק וירוק - white (or pale), red and green. In Bereishis it associates these three colors with Gavriel, Michael and Raphael. Elsewhere (Bamidbar 215a) it associates them with the three Avos. In one of the maamarim (chassidic discourses) of R. Shneur Zalman of Liadi, he ...


8

Pesachim 54A says the rainbow was created on the sixth day: Ten things were created on the eve of the Sabbath at twilight. These are they: the well, the manna, the rainbow, the writing and the writing instrument[s], the Tables, the sepulchre of Moses, the cave in which Moses and Elijah stood, the opening of the ass's mouth, and the opening of the earth's ...


8

It is a halacha l'Moshe miSinai that the r'tzu'os must be black (M'nachos 35a), and this is a requirement for valid t'fillin. The straps must be re-blackened if the paint becomes scratched or abraded (Bach OC 32:25). Abrasions are especially common (if not readily noticeable) in the vicinity of the knot of the shel yad, and special attention should be paid ...


7

Although Shulchan Aruch YD 182:6 forbids a man to do so, placing it in the category of "women's dress", he continues to forbid looking in a mirror as well. A parenthetical notation (Rema?)is made following the mirror halacha sending you to YD 156 were the Rema quotes those who say that this law is dependant on whether men customarily look in a mirror or if ...


7

From Rabbi Hershel Schachter's YUTorah lecture on the topic: The stripes are reminiscent of the techeilet (blue string) that everyone used to wear; depending on the concentration of the dye, you could a color anywhere from light blue to near-black; hence some people have blue stripes, some have black. I believe there are also kabbalistic meanings behind ...


7

The Kaf Hachaim (9:15) brings many sources and reasons why the Talit itself should be completely white (although he says black stripes at the bottom do not invalidate this, since we look at the majority of the Talit). A couple of the reasons he brings: Shulchan Aruch says that the Tzitzit should be the same color as the garment, since the strings are ...


7

It says in the Rambam and Rashi that the strings of a Tallis have to be the same color as the Tallis itself. Tosfos writes that there is no obligation to do so, and the color of the strings does not have to be the same as that of the Tallis. The Halacha is like this opinion. Moreover, the custom in the Ashkenazi world is to make the strings white even when ...


7

The Mishna was referring to specific sects at the time. If we had solid reason to believe today that a person's dress indicated serious rifts with mainstream Jewish theology, we'd think twice about having them lead prayers (and, as was done then, apply poetic license in how to recite the texts). I don't really see that as an issue now.


7

The Shach on Shulchan Aruch 178:1 (s.k. 3) says וצבע השחור הוא דרך צניעות והכנעה וכדאמרינן מי שיצרו מתגבר עליו ילבש שחורים ויתעטף שחורים Not clear if he's talking about men or women or both. But he's commenting on the Rema saying not to wear red, which it's reasonable to suggest is probably at least aimed at women as well, I'm not sure how many men ...


6

Could be just as a cheap alternative to gilt-edged pages, such as you find on expensive books (both Jewish and non-Jewish).


6

There are traditional sources (e.g. the Talmud discusses shoelaces) that yes, red is flashier and perhaps more attractive. That doesn't mean it's prohibited. If you look up "red clothing" in the index to the Igrot Moshe, you'll find the following discussion by Rabbi Moshe Feinstein: A style of clothing can be prohibited if it's just plain inappropriate. ...


6

Dittos to YS. The reason that many Ashkenazim stopped using red wine for the seder is because of the blood libels, but today (unless you live in an Arabic country) this is not a concern and therefore it is preferable to use red wine for the four cups at the seder.


6

If you ever look at sfarim that are commonly opened to specific sections (like a siddur), you'll notice that there are black lines around those pages that are more commonly used (you could, for example, land almost exactly on the last page of Shacharis). When the pages are colored, you don't see those lines.


6

Here's a quote from Halacha for Today (Question 260): Q: Could you tell me if it is permissible for a man to dye his hair? A: A man may not dye his hair if doing so for beauty or to hide white hair etc. as this is a biblical transgression of "Lo Tilbash" not to wear (or otherwise imitate) the ways of the opposite gender. This includes dying hair, ...


6

Rabbi Moshe Feinstein allowed the photo grey lenses, though others disagree. For more on the theory behind this, see this excellent article from the Star-K's Rabbi Mordechai Frankel (based on the ruling of Rabbi Moshe Heinemann). It discusses the related question of diapers that change color when wet.


6

I saw an excellent comprehensive article on exactly this topic It brings down all the opinions and reasons, but the bottom line is that these photo chromic lenses are permitted on shabbos.


6

While I haven't looked it up, I think I recall hearing that the ingredients should be kosher.


6

Rabbi Aryeh Kaplan quotes Kabbalistic sources that he was using meditation "to direct spiritual energy and actually to change the genetic structure of the sheep ... manipulating some of the highest spiritual forces that exist." Okay, as I'm neither a Kabbalist nor a bioengineer, I'll take his word for it ... The simplest way to read the whole story (as I ...


6

Me'am Loez on this parsha actually talks about it. Edit: After chasing down the source (יפ"ת דתכ"ב), I found the (hopefully) original in Medrash Rabbah. This photo is from Me'am Loez. Quick translation: There was a story with a black man who was married to a black woman, and they had a white son. He came to Rabbeinu Hakadosh and said, "this is ...


6

One of the answers the Mizrachi to Rashi on Bereshit 30:39 brings is that the sticks were just used to cover up the miracle. The angel appeared to Yaakov and showed him that all the animals would be born with the pattern that would benefit Yaakov. Yaakov then used to sticks to hide the miracle. (The Mizrachi is addressing another issue, which is how could ...



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