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Professor James A. Diamond of the University of Waterloo provides several academic sources in his paper on how Lavan tricked Yaakov (his answer is basically veil + inebriation). These sources in turn claim that veiling the bride was a common practice in that place at that time, none cite the works of Chazal or the Rishonim in support for this contention.


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The idea is discussed in hatorah.net There under קיב ע"א, he notes that Talmidei Chachomim only took their shoes off on Friday night. He records Yoma 78b and says (my translation of an extract) it can be explained through Rav Nachman bar Yitzchok's maamar in Gittin 57b on the possuk (כי עליך הורגנו כל היום" (תהלים מד"  which he says refers ...


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Additional sources regarding shoes, sandals and slippers (but not socks) include: Rav Yosef Haim of Baghdad, in Parashat Pinhas Shana Sheniya, 16 Rav Haim Kanievsk There is also a disagreement on the length of sleep required for this to be a problem.


3

First of all, to clarify what the question is/should be, there's no obligation to wear tzitzis under normal circumstances, unless one is wearing a four cornered garment. Hence, the fact that tzitzis aren't in the list of clothing is not a problem; they aren't commanded in wearing an extra garment to put on tzitzis, just as no Jew is obligated (strictly ...


2

What is clear to you is not so clear to me, but see Mishna Berurah siman 91 #12 Where he states the general rule to wear only clothing you would wear when talking with an important person. He adds that this is dependant on the usual behavior of the time. Another point he mentions there is not to wear the type of gloves that people would wear when traveling. ...


5

The prohibition comes from Devarim 22:5, for which Rashi provides commentary as follows. Please click on the image to view "full screen" mode. Rashi is citing from the relevant section of the Babylonian Talmud (b. Nazir 8:1a, II.4.E [Folio 59A]), which appears as follows. Please click on the image to view "full screen" mode. The yellow highlighted area ...


20

From Rav Aviner's tshuvot (text) Wearing Wife's Jacket in the Cold Q: Is it permissible for a husband to wear his wife's jacket if he is cold, or is it forbidden on account of "Lo Yilbash" (the prohibition of cross-dressing)? And what about visa-versa? A: It is permissible, since the purpose is not to wear it but simply to warm up (Shut ...


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A KLI is not muktza unless oser bianoo, muktza Bain hashmoshois, muktsa machmas mitsva, or muktsa machmas hsoroin kis But if the KLI is set for use that is forbidden on Shabos you can only move it to use it or for its place but not to save it from harm This KLI seems to fall in the category of a KLI used for permitted things, that is only forbidden to be ...


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Rav Neustadt distinguishes between  a) severe (chamur) muktzeh - items which are "set apart" before Shabbos because they will definitely not be used on Shabbos. and b) light (kal) muktzeh - items which are set apart because they are normally used for activities which are prohibited on Shabbos, but may, on occasion, be used for a permitted ...


3

It seems to me that the answer to your question is that a man's spreading his legs is not as suggestive a position as the posture isn't reminiscent of intercourse (where a woman's spreading her legs is more...ergonomic). Indeed the phrase פישוק רגליים "spreading the legs" comes from Ezekiel 16:25 where the context and commentaries are clear that what is ...


5

Although the real answer to your question would be found in the Double AA's answer, it's worth noting that there was at least one authority who did believe that pisuk raglayim was an issue for men as well, albeit not as big an issue as for women. The Chazon Ish felt that wearing a long jacket was proper for exactly this issue. In fact he would wear an extra ...


2

Minhagim, are not halachos, but there are as strict and well guarded as halachos and laws. It's been the minhag for ages for women not to wear tzitzis or talisim, so I and many others cling to the idea that women should not wear talisim. It is not discriminating women. Women have a more special connection with Hashem, and so by wearing tzitzis a women is ...


3

They are called "quarter shoes" or פערטל שיך* in Yiddish. They are only worn with breeches and knee-socks (regardless of color). Many wear these shoes only on Shabbos. (Even if they wear breeches on weekdays, they may wear more regular shoes, e.g. "half shoes" הלבע שיך.*) They are therefore also known as "sabbatical shoes" שבת׳דיגע שיך. The style still ...


10

This article summarizes the rules of dress for both men and women required for saying brachot. There are footnotes to sources, as well. Excerpts: Another aspect of “holiness” when saying a bracha is that a man is required to have a “separation between his heart and his lower body.” This typically requires no special attention, as it is accomplished ...


3

Shulchan Aruch HaRav writes (O.C. 307:30) (quoting Shulchan Aruch O.C. 307:16): ובדברי חשק יש עוד איסור אפילו כתובים בלשון הקודש שמגרה יצר הרע בעצמו ומי שחיברן ומי שהעתיקן ואין צריך לומר המדפיסן הם בכלל מחטיאי הרבים In arousing literature there is another prohibition [besides issues of reading them on Shabbos] even if they are written in Hebrew ...


8

Iggros Moshe Even Haezer 1:69 applies the prohibition of seeing immodestly dressed women/men to seeing inappropriate behavior, with the reasoning that the problem is the thought process it instigates. Based on this logic he applies it to images in films, and even reading about inappropriate activity in books. So if these drawn images conjure up ...


3

The verse in Ecclesiastes is not one of law and it was explained in a particular way. The basic commentary on the verse (from Rashi who cites the talmud) is At all times, let your garments be white: Prepare yourself at all times with good deeds, so that if you die today, you will enter in peace. And Solomon likened this to a man whom the king invited for ...



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