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24

It is definitely allowed according to halachah; this teacher was probably speaking about what he felt was the pious and holy way to behave. But the truth is that one must be extremely careful when trying to act "beyond the letter of the law," that he should not damage his Sholom Bayis in the process. The Chazon Ish in his "Iggeres Kodesh" (cited in Mishkan ...


18

See pg. 127 ff. of this publication from YCT. It is an article by Jason Weiner titled "ON THE HALAKHIC BASIS FOR WEARING BLACK HATS". In this article he discusses 5 reasons given by the Rabbinical Authorities for wearing a black hat: Kavod (Respect) Distingishing ourselves from the other nations Atifah (Wrap) Double Covering A Jewish custom has the ...


15

Here, Rabbi Y.H. Henkin quotes his grandfather (Rabbi Yosef Henkin) as saying there is no prohibition against women wearing loose pants, and in fact they are exemplary ("yesh bo mishum tzenius"): "See Bnei Banim vol. 2 p. 211 par. 38, and vol. 4 p. 141 (concerning pisuk raglayim)." Here are the sources: ...


15

Taking it for granted that the issue of "male attire" is ultimately not the source for the prohibitions, a stance I believe is justifiable even if not un-debatable, there remains a significant opposition to women wearing slacks on the grounds of modesty. Although most noted for taking the hard-line position that wearing slacks violates the prohibition of ...


15

You are to be commended for taking on a socially-challenging mitzvah. It's not always easy to be Jewish and be seen as different, whether it's through dress, food, or how you spend your Friday nights and Saturdays. With any observance that sets you apart from others, take care in how you talk about it. It's about you, not about them, especially for your ...


13

Shulchan Aruch (Orach Chaim 8:11) states that the tallis katan should be worn over one's clothes, "so that he will always see it and remember the mitzvos." Magen Avraham (subsec. 13) comments that kesavim ([Kabbalistic] writings) say that it should specifically be worn under one's clothes, but he says that nonetheless the actual tzitzis should be left ...


13

I heard Rabbi Berel Wein discussing that Rashi's headcovering (in the animated film made by Rabbi Wein) is red, maroon, and/or brown. The historical research shows those were men's colors for Jews in Rashi's time and place. Someone objected that it should be a black velvet yarmulka. Rabbi Wein replied that black happened in the 1400s as a result of a Church ...


13

You have to get dressed in the way that your naked areas won't be exposed. You aren't allowed to say, "I am in my innermost room; who can see me?" G-d can see you. Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 2:1-2.


12

So long as it isn't indecent, Rabbi Moshe Feinstein (Igros Moshe Y.D. 1:81) writes that it's not a problem. I've written it up here. And for those who don't believe me, here's what it looks like in the original responsum: Link to the pdf: page 1, page 2. Specifically regarding jeans it's even easier as we know where jeans come from -- gold prospectors ...


12

Shmiras Shabbas Ke'Hilchasa (18:44) writes that one may walk into a Reshus HaRabbim with an identification label that is sewn or stuck to one's garment.


11

If appearing at the minyan without hat would disturb the other people (or their standard practice), then you have a question. Otherwise (e.g. most people at shul don't wear hats), this should be straightforward; daven with the minyan. Shulchan Aruch says "one should strive very much [yishtadel me'od] to daven with a minyan." You won't find anything about ...


11

Eisav was "סמוך על שלחן אביו" - living at home at his parents' expense, therefore his finds and his gifts legally automatically belong to his parents - see Bava Metzia 12a/12b, R' Yom-Tob Asevilli ("Ritb"a") ibid. and Shul'han Aru'h 366:10.


11

The Shulchan Aruch rules (YD 340:11) that women and men have an equal obligation in terms of keri'a, but that women should turn their undershirt around after tearing it before tearing her overshirt. Furthermore, in :15 he rules that a woman who performed keri'a is allowed to perform a non-professional stitch-up immediately after tearing, whereas a man would ...


10

Shulchan Aruch (Orach Chaim 91:2) states: "One must wear a gartel (Heb. ezor) while praying, even if he has a belt (to hold his pants up - Mishnah Berurah sec. 5) so that his heart doesn't see his private parts; this is in order [to fulfill the dictum], 'Prepare [yourself to meet your G-d, O Israel]' (Amos 4:12)." Mishnah Berurah (sec. 4) qualifies this ...


10

A Mexican Poncho. Usually a large square of woven wool with a hole in the middle for the head to go through. Those almost certainly need tzitzis.


10

Nit'ei Gavriel (Aveilus 4:4) cites various sources that there is a common practice to not tear kriyah in this instance anyway (and in note יב he mentions other variations, such as leaving a button undone for a while, or tearing kriyah at the moment of death only for a distinguished person). In 4:7 he also writes that it is indeed not customary for doctors ...


10

Shulchan Aruch 301:37 says: It's permissible to go out on Shabas with handgear called guantes [=gloves]. But some are strict to require that one sew them before Shabas to the handgear [=sleeves] of his clothes, or tie them to them well with a durable knot; and it is seemly to worry about that view. Mishna B'rura (ad loc.) says: Those who are ...


10

The only source I have yet to find acknowledging this switch in clothing from a Sephardic perspective is in the English edition to the Yalkut Yosef Hilkhot Shabbat. Under Siman 242, Halakhah 5, regarding the mitzvah to change from weekday clothes into more elegant garments, the editor (R. Yisrael Bitan) added a special footnote: The Kabbalists ruled that ...


9

The Chayei Adam says for birkas hamazon, "and wear a hat, like any respectable person would do if they were walking in the street." R' Yitzchak Hutner once told a fellow: "wear a hat. A yarmulka is too easy to fold up and put in your pocket if you get embarrassed of being Jewish." (Very similar to the Lubavitcher Rebbe's letter about sheitels vs. ...


9

Most Chasidim do not wear ties. However there are some that do. Those that do not - do so as "In Der Alte Heim" they did not either. Those that do - do so as "In Der Alte Heim" they wore them. For example: The Skvere Chasidim wear boots year round. The reason they wore them "In Der Alte Heim" was due to the severe cold weather. However they have continued ...


9

It could be based on the prohibition of Chukot HaAku"m, as wearing a tie has no particular inherent practical purpose. See particularly (and ironically) the Beiur HaGr"a YD 178 sk 6.


9

No, they do not need to dangle. Many rabbis, including my Rosh Yeshiva, tuck their tzitzit under their belt to keep them neat and prevent them from ripping on nearby objects. In addition, letting them dangle could be considered "undignified" and "shlumpy." Rabbi Menachem Posner of Chabad recommends "tucking them under your belt and then into your pants ...


9

Person. You don't need to have tzitzit on a tallit that you keep in a drawer. Source: Talmud Menachot 41. See also Rambam Hil. Tzitzit 3:10-11, Shulchan Aruch OC 19:1


9

I think a rabbi would tell you pretty much what a psychologist would tell you here -- if it's a young child it's not a big deal; if it's an older child that can be a bit weird for them. If I recall correctly, halacha discusses the permissibility of a father co-sleeping with his young daughter; if she's young enough that she wouldn't be embarrassed naked in ...


9

The Chinuch says in Mitzvah #443 in reference to the prohibition of men wearing women's clothing: "ונוהג איסור זה בכל מקום ובכל זמן-This prohibition applies in all places, and at all times." So, it seems pretty clear that it's not allowed in any sort of setting. In general, you should know, that the mitzvot apply equally in public and private. For ...


8

I recall reading the study in question and it is significant in that the color red did not effect how the male perceived the female's other traits such as intelligence or kindness but only his, shall we say, interest in her. Although it is not clear based on this study whether this tendency is the result of biological factors, cultural factors, or both, it ...


8

Wearing Tzitzit in has its source in Sha'ar HaKavvanot 7b(it is also found in the language of the Tur Siman 8). Rav Ovadya Hedayya ZTz"L writes in Yaskil Avdei 5:3 and in 8:2 extended Teshuvot for wearing tzitzit tucked in. The first is al pi halakha and the second is more al pi sod. Rav Ovadiah Yosef Shlita also writes an extended Teshuva to that effect ...


8

Firstly, I don't know of anyone who requires a kippa as opposed to some other head covering. So if at work he could wear a beret, hard-hat, baseball cap, coonskin cap, deerstalker, you name it, by all means do that. There's the issue of head coverings for praying; for making blessings; for eating; and then at all other times. Much of yarmulka as we know ...


8

See this article from Rabbi Brody. Basically there are two opinions about yom kippur shoes. One is that anything non-leather is fine. The other is that they should also be not-too-cushiony. While the former seems to be common practice, the latter is cited as a good practice by many poskim. So there are three possibilities about crocs: They are ...


8

Rabbi Elyashiv ZY"A said that the wearing of Crocs on Yom Kippur is forbidden because they are indeed too comfortable. (Source)



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