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10

The Ramban says the reason why his name is not mentioned is due to the fact that the city was small with few people living there, he was not famous. The Shaarei Aharon (from whom I am quoting all these answers) suggests that the names mentioned here are based on the evil nature of the people we are mentioning. Being that the king of Tzoar was not so evil ...


5

Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim siman 398 defines how we measure the 2000 amot and the city. In essence, the cluster of houses we call a city is obviously a city. First of all, we square it off. (For odd-shaped cities, there are different rules as to how we square it.) From there, we measure an extra 70.66 amot around the city that counts as part of the city. ...


5

According to R' Herschel Schachter, the designation of "your city" for this purpose is based on association, rather than geography. In an interview on the topic with Jewish Action magazine, he said: However, aniyei ircha does not refer to the poor people of your city literally. I live in Manhattan. Are all the poor people in New York considered my aniyei ...


4

The Gemora (Sanhedrin 41a) writes (cited partially by Rashi to Yehoshua 6:10) : ויאמר ה' אל יהושע קום לך . . אתה גרמת להם והיינו דקאמר ליה בעי ועשית לעי ולמלכה כאשר עשית ליריחו ולמלכה וגו' And Hashem said to Yehoshua, "Get up." . . Hashem said to him, You have brought [guilt] upon them. For that reason He said to him with reference to Ai: "And you ...


4

Malbim on this wording (verse 2) explains that Elijah did not want to enter Beth-el, because one of Jeroboam's calf statues was there (Kings I 12:28-29).


3

Yehoshua Meir Grainitz mentioned in Da'as Mikra says that Lesha is Leshem which is mentioned in Yehoshua 19:47. He says that it is also known as Layish as mentioned in Shoftim 18:27 & 18:28. Thanks to אראל סגל הלוי for this answer. This would lead me to conclude that Lesha is not the same place as Tzoar/Bela. However this still leaves open the ...


3

Lot surveyed the whole land and chose Sodom. (Gen 13) He presumably wouldn't have done so if they had such a reputation, let alone stayed if he was actually subject to such treatment. MORE importantly - Lot arrived in Sodom at a time when he was extremely wealthy (Gen 13). Its very possible that the angels were targeted because they were seen as ...


2

Sodom was about "no freeloaders." You try to mooch, we rape you. Lot came in with money and was accepted. Hence, no rape. Remember, the Jewish interpretation is that Sodom wasn't about lust. It was about power and cruelty; rape was just a tool in the box.


2

There are some other places where יושבי is used similarly. In Josh. 17:7 ישבי עין תפוח is used as a geographical marker, and in v. 11 there seems to be a distinction between the cities and their inhabitants: בית שאן... ויבלעם... ישבי דאר... וישבי עין דר... וישבי תענך... וישבי מגדו. But that just strengthens the question as to what this difference means. ...


2

When I went to Eretz Yisrael (in 5727), I was told (by Rabbi Besdin Z'tzl of YU) that it depends on where you normally live. If you are living in Yerushalayim and happen to be elsewhere, then you should (if you can) return to Yerushalayim for Shushan Purim. However, you can attend the megilla reading where you happen to be especially if you are not sure that ...


1

Fascinating question! I'm piecing together excerpts from several Wikipedia pages, as each links to another: Lasha was a place east of the Dead Sea, known for its hot springs. It was eventually named Callirhoe. (Not essentially trusting Wikipedia's say on this, I did confirm that the name is, apparently correct if you view Targum Yonatan's ...


1

I was told by a Chabad rabbi in Jerusalem that the custom is to say "shechiyanu" if this is the case, since Purim and Shushan Purim are actually different holidays. I think there's probably room to do it either way, though, since obviously the halakhic principle of "no blessing in case of a doubt" applies here as well.


1

While I don't have much too add, there is a relevant source here. see Shabbos 10b, all the way on the bottom. Gemarah discusses how tzoar was one year younger than sedom, and therefore not condemned. What may remain, though, is whether it wasn't condemned then, meaning it still had some time, or that it wasn't condemned, meaning not included in this ...


1

About Tzoar (will try to add more if time allows). I believe the traditional approach is that its execution was temporarily suspended to give Lot a short-term refuge, and after he leaves to the mountains shortly, that city is also destroyed. In a beautiful exposition, the Akeydas Yitzchak notes a verse in Devarim (29:22) that Moshe lists 4 out of 5 cities ...


1

Not sure if this is what you're looking for but the fact that you now have an uncertainty about the presence of the "unreliable" rabbanut's ingredients in the purchased product certified by the "reliable" rabbanut is usually halachically relevant - e.g. if now there is a sefek sefeika (double uncetainty) or safek d'rabanan (l'kula). (Menachem's application ...


1

It was the home of one of the greatest, some would say the greatest, kabbalists of all time, Yitzack Luria, commonly known as the Ari. It was also one of four holy cities in Eretz Yisrael where jews lived before the beginning of the modern Aliyahs



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