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11

It seems, according to this article, that people found a way. It would seem that as long as Jews stayed in the moderate climate on the shores of the Mediterranean, there was no difficulty obtaining etrogim for the holiday. As people moved north into France, Germany, Poland and Russia, however, the temperature-sensitive tree could not exist and tremendous ...


5

Minhagei Lita (Customs of Lithuanian Jewry) by Rabbi Menachem Mendel Poliakoff.


4

The author is probably referring to certain areas adjacent to Eretz Yisrael, and possibly to Suria (some part of modern day Syria) that share some of the "laws of the land", however they have a lesser level of kedushah and not all stringencies were applied to them. These are mentioned throughout the Mishna in Seder Zeraim. Within Eretz Yisrael proper, there ...


4

The Radbaz's language (responsum #296) is that he can kill "keMishpat", lawfully. A mob boss, for instance, has the ability to kill, but not lawfully. So I presume if the use of power was totally unlawful for the position, halacha wouldn't consider it. (It doesn't say "he can kill anyone he feels like", or "he can kill you." Just that he can lawfully find ...


3

Shulchan Arukh YD 294:9 (based on Kiddushin 39a) rules that doubtful (safek) Orlah in the Diaspora is permitted; only certain (vadai) Orlah is prohibited. Even if you know the fruit came from a orchard with Orlah trees, if you don't know which tree it came from then it is permitted. So any fruit you find in the grocery which was not imported from Israel and ...


2

According to the סדר עבודת ישראל, whilst מנהג פולין say אב הרחמים on שבת מברכים החודש only during ספירת העומר, it says that ק''ק פראג (Prague) also say it on שבת מברכים החודש מנחם אב. http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=42807&st=&pgnum=252


2

Rambam writes (Maachalos Asuros 10:11-12): ספק ערלה וכלאי הכרם בארץ ישראל אסור. בסוריא והיא ארצות שכבש דוד מותר. כיצד היה כרם וערלה וענבים נמכרות חוצה לו. היה ירק זרוע בתוכו וירק נמכר חוצה לו. שמא ממנו הוא זה שמא מאחר. בסוריא מותר ובחוצה לארץ אפילו ראה הענבים יוצאות מכרם ערלה או ירק יוצא מן הכרם לוקח מהן. והוא שלא יראה אותו בוצר מן הערלה או לוקט ...


2

I wrote this up as a question here although it is not an exact duplicate. Like you I believe we might need to say a blessing right away. See here for one possible source confirming this from R Herschel Schachter in a lecture on whether mezuza is a mitsva d'oraita or d'rabbanan (since the accepted view is that it is d'rabbanan for renters) who concludes that ...


2

I think the premise to your question is mistaken. The situation of delaying a blessing only applies if you don't know how long you're renting for and are concerned you will be living there LESS than 30 days. But if you have a set lease for more than 30 days (and will be living there long term) then you should put a mezuzah up as soon as possible with a ...


2

Arthur Kurzweil (the publisher and Jewish genealogy specialist) wrote a wonderful article on this 20 years ago which stayed with me until now. See it fully here. He brings a number of relevant quotes to your questions re beggars and non-Jews. 1. Do Jews give to beggars? Our Rabbis taught: If an orphan boy and an orphan girl applied for maintenance, the ...


2

It varied tremendously across Europe. World War I actually demolished a lot of communal structure, and Orthodox observance declined from there. Rabbi Joseph Soloveichik commented that as a young child he recalled when most Jews kept shabbos, and by the time he was a young man that had changed. As a college student passing through the great city of Vilnius, ...


2

The law is in shulchan aruch orach Chaim 490 I guess that it is the same reason that we are strict to say shehechyanu (and do everything) on the second day as on the first day (since we live by the calander now lasy people might say it is not the same as the first day and we can do what we want) As the shulchan aruch harav 490.1 sais ... יבאו ...


1

Rabbi Hassan describes the problem here: Now is there a problem for Sephardim? This is a complicated area of halakha but I will try and write as short and as clear as possible. Rav Yosef Caro (Shulkhan Arukh O.H. 345:7) wrote that the definition of a public domain is a street that is 16 amot wide (32 feet) or more that are not enclosed. Some say ...


1

The Art Scroll 51b2 and 52a1 explains that this is in a case in which the second day of Yom Tov was still a local custom. That is, it depended on where the messengers reached to determine which communities had a second day of Yom Tov. Because Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur caused the travel time to be curtailed in Tishrei, some communities had a second day of ...


1

The most basic explanation of the issue is that the day becomes a tarti disasri, a self contradiction. How can it be both the last day of Succos and Shmini Atzeres? I've heard many drashos trying to explain in depth what the issue is to actually enjoin it as a multiplicity of days, but I will offer one that seems simple. The wording used in the Tur ...


1

I believe this is the same reason we do not say the blessing on dwelling in the Sukkah on Shemini Atzereth, namely, to make a verbal declaration (or an action*) on Yom Tov that implies that it is chol would be considered a profanation of the sanctity of the day. *such a waving the four species; this reasoning is also used to justify the controversial custom ...


1

Since the majority of produce on the market is not Orlah, we can assume that any given fruit etc. it is permissible, using the halachic principle of rov. (Regarding Reva'i, I'm pretty sure it doesn't apply in the diaspora. The mishna in Kiddushin only mentions Orlah.) (I'll try to add an explicit source later).



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